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Anti-porn rally aims at keeping sexualized ads out of community

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  • morpunkt Glendora, CA
    July 18, 2014 8:44 a.m.

    Yes. And we can start with Carl's Jr. ads. They are highly sexualized.

  • worf Mcallen, TX
    July 18, 2014 9:12 a.m.

    Time to clean things up.

  • jeanie orem, UT
    July 18, 2014 9:57 a.m.

    Exactly why I rarely go to the University Mall in Orem - in " Family City" no less.

    I have been called a prude, Amish, backwards, hyper sensitive, religion pusher, etc. for being bothered that my sons have to walk by huge air brushed posters of unrealistic woman's bodies in provocative poses. If you are one of those people, fine, have at me, but the science states otherwise as documented in this article - and you are wrong.

    It is so disheartening to have a child succumb to porn. It gets it's hooks in them early and it's a long, discouraging battle to free them. We pad our kids up to the eyeballs to send them out on scooters and bikes. But when it comes to images that are proven to be destructive, as a society we have no collective will to help innocents stay safe. I applaud those who take on this battle.

  • jeanie orem, UT
    July 18, 2014 10:00 a.m.

    Cont.

    Some say "you are teaching children to be ashamed of their bodies". That's the dumbest argument I've heard. As if we don't know the difference between respecting our bodies and exploiting natural appetites. Touting unrealistic images does more to shame us about our bodies than anything.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    July 18, 2014 12:01 p.m.

    I didn't see this flyer, but I wonder, is it any 'worse' than one would see by going to the Bountiful swimming pool? If not why all the fuss?

  • shamrock Salt Lake City, UT
    July 18, 2014 12:40 p.m.

    With so much "real porn" around (both hardcore and softcore), I have to wonder why they're focusing on women in skimpy outfits. It's like getting upset about mosquitoes when there's a tiger at the door.

  • jeanie orem, UT
    July 18, 2014 2:44 p.m.

    Shamrock,

    You didn't read the article, did you? Read it again and see if you can understand why.

  • herblay North Ogden, UT
    July 18, 2014 3:09 p.m.

    I'm fairly certain we should also ban provocative dress. Maybe we physically protest anyone who goes out in public who's clothes aren't "garment friendly"?

    And shut down public swimming pools. Have you seen how people dress?

  • John C. C. Payson, UT
    July 18, 2014 8:18 p.m.

    The Supreme Court recognized that community values can be used to define pornography differently in some communities as opposed to others. This is an open invitation for ua everyday citizens to keep telling offenders and our government regulators that our standards are higher.

  • Mainly Me Werribee, 00
    July 18, 2014 10:11 p.m.

    The road to problems with porn doesn't start with ads or at the pool. It starts with parents unwittingly exposing their kids to immodestly dress characters in supposedly "family friendly" entertainment. Take a look a Disney and how they promote immodesty. I won't let my grandkids watch things like Little Mermaid or anything else that has immodestly dressed characters. This is the beginning of the road to problems with porn.

  • intervention slc, UT
    July 18, 2014 11:00 p.m.

    Funny how when it's something you support it is about "community values" and "cleaning things up" but when it's things you disagree with it just that dreaded "political correctness."

  • Something to think about Ogden, UT
    July 19, 2014 7:38 a.m.

    It's not the commercial that bother me most!... it is the ads for the late night shows! The later "prime time" show are the real trash on TV. They are rated "M" for mature, which is all good and well, but the ads for them are ran during "kid time" in the early late afternoon.

    Several show's ads are way worse than any product line. That's what needs to be policed!

  • On my mind Bountiful, UT
    July 19, 2014 10:22 a.m.

    cjb: I have never personally seen a topless woman at the Bountiful swimming pool...so yes this ad was worse. If you had seen the ad and your 12 year old son was the one who picked up the mail I imagine you would be upset as well..The point of this press conference was not to target this one business (who by the way has since apologized) but to target the industry as a whole and let them know that we have high standards when it comes to protecting out children.

  • Stormwalker Cleveland , OH
    July 19, 2014 5:04 p.m.

    @Mainly Me: "The road to problems with porn doesn't start with ads or at the pool. It starts with parents unwittingly exposing their kids to immodestly dress characters in supposedly "family friendly" entertainment."

    Absolutely true. I used to watch cartoons where Bugs Bunny put on women's clothes and it made me gay.

  • sid 6.7 Holladay, UT
    July 23, 2014 9:40 a.m.

    Pull your dogs back ladies! This company has come out and apologized and publically admitted on several occasions to making a mistake.

    Their efforts have not been enough and now you want to make them suffer more? Enough with the vengeance already.

    Hold your rally somewhere else.

  • Ryan J Bozeman, MT
    July 23, 2014 12:59 p.m.

    In a world where pornography is everywhere, parents do well by teaching their kids what to do when they see porn. The mail flyer sounds like a good opportunity to teach kids what to do when it is pushed in your face. I get that the community wants to limit these encounters but I feel it is just as important to teach kids how to react to the onslaught of pornography as it is to limit exposure. Also, I feel parents need to be very available to answer questions about sex, and start conversations about it early. My 2nd and 4th grader kids came to me with questions about sex this school year. I felt it super important to teach them about the wonder of the human body and addressed each question with as much enthusiasm as I do when teaching about astronomy or gardening. I think by being open about sex with our kids we help them combat the addictive nature of pornography.

  • NeilT Clearfield, UT
    July 25, 2014 10:42 a.m.

    Has anyone seen the Blue Boutique billboard on Riverdale Road and 900 West. If the same billboard were posted in Utah County it would be down in an hour. It is not the immodest dress, it is what is portrayed. I am surprised it has not generated any controversy.