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Letters: Legalize marijuana

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  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 12:19 p.m.

    I don't care if we legalize marijuana... as long as we have significant penalties for it's abuse and the accompanying social ills that come when you choose to get involved with it (same for alcohol abuse).

    I don't want to pay for these people's rehab, or their unemployment when their job performance drops or they quit showing up to work, or their hospitalizations for drug interactions when they get addicted to this or something stronger.

    When people can't function without being in an altered state (from Marijuana or Alcohol)... they become a burned on society. I don't want to pay because they chose to drop-out and indulge in Marijuana or Alcohol instead of working hard and being a productive member of society.

    When you take the drug culture's mantra to heart (turn on, tune in, drop out)... you become a burden on society. That's YOUR decision. YOU enjoy the consequences of that decision (not me).

    Same goes for alcoholics. If you choose to use and become addicted or dependent on it to function.. that's YOUR choice, not mine.

    Legalize the choice... but put some personal responsibility on the decision too.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 1:18 p.m.

    Here Here!

    The only one's opposed to marijuana are tea-totalers
    (who already would not use it whether it's legal or not),
    and
    BIG Pharmacutical Industries.

    You are either FOR freedom
    or
    You are not.

    BTW -- Irony of the day;

    The same people who think AK-47s can't be banned from criminals and the mentally ill,
    ban a common weed.

  • SG in SLC Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 2:29 p.m.

    Y'know, after reading this letter and the accompanying comments, for some strange reason I have a sudden case of the munchies . . .

  • liberal larry salt lake City, utah
    Nov. 13, 2013 2:31 p.m.

    Although I don't use the wacky weed, a lot of track athletes in the 70's were smokers and I don't know of any of them who tuned into serious addicts. The same can't be said of people I know who used alcohol.

    Instead of saying yea or nay to marijuana maybe we should see how it works in Washington State and in Colorado. It should only take about 5 to 10 years to see if the benefits of legalization out weigh the costs of criminalizing cannabis.

    After all, a lot people claimed that legalizing gay marriage would usher in the demise of straight unions but so far I haven't seen any traditional marriage breakups blamed on the existence of gay nuptials.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 4:49 p.m.

    Re: "The public is so concerned about the dangers of marijuana, but have they forgotten about the alcohol-related deaths that occur every year?"

    No, we haven't forgotten. But why should we take the deranged step of adding to the alcohol problem, by creating more of a marijuana problem?

    Marijuana is a dangerous drug. As dangerous and heroin, meth, and cocaine? Yes, because it leads people to ALL of them. And, marijuana kills people every day. Not so much the users, perhaps, but WAY too many of their innocent victims, both direct and indirect. Drug production, transport, and distribution chains are littered with bodies, and marijuana users have the blood of many thousands of innocents on their hands.

    Potheads are not just engaged in some cute, harmless parlor game, with no victims but themselves. Besides destruction of their own brains, each toke encourages and enables creation of more slaves, widows, orphans, and vicious cartel bosses. And, there's not the slightest evidence that legalization would change that, particularly in the corrupt third world.

    DON'T legalize marijuana!

  • Happy Valley Heretic Orem, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 6:06 p.m.

    procuradorfiscal said:

    " Marijuana is a dangerous drug. As dangerous and heroin, meth, and cocaine? Yes, because it leads people to ALL of them. And, marijuana kills people every day. "

    Awe, the old and false, gateway drug approach. The problem here is that correlation isn’t cause.
    Hell’s Angels motorcycle gang members are probably a 1000 times more likely to have ridden a bicycle as a kid than those who don’t become Hell’s Angels, but that doesn’t mean that riding a two-wheeler is a “gateway” to joining a motorcycle gang.

    0 Deaths can be attributed to Marijauna overdose.

    So if we're talking dangerous drugs, start with overdose amounts, then you can start making assumptions and loose statistical correlation for kicks and giggles.

    "Drug production, transport, and distribution chains are littered with bodies, and marijuana users have the blood of many thousands of innocents on their hands."

    If it were legal, those problems you name wouldn't exist, would they?
    In fact it could bring in tax dollars instead of spending them to house non-violent criminals.

    Fact - Marijuana is NOT a dangerous drug!

  • Mister J Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 13, 2013 8:01 p.m.

    Legalize Marijuana. Criminalize Twinkies.

  • airnaut Everett, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 7:07 a.m.

    procuradorfiscal
    Tooele, UT
    4:49 p.m. Nov. 13, 2013

    ==========

    LOL!
    Somebody's been watching way too much "Reefer Madness"

    Try spouting the real facts first,
    then do a side by side comparison to other "accidents".

    All the other issues you sight about "drug cartels" disappear with legalization.
    Try studying up on "Prohibition" and the Mobs and Gangs why don't you...

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    Nov. 14, 2013 8:31 a.m.

    All I can say is that watching some folks I have known for decades who are addicted to Marijuana, the effects in their lives are clear.

    They have little ambition and have accomplished little to nothing.

    Are there exceptions? Always. But from my observations the stereotype exists for a reason.

  • Blue Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 8:53 a.m.

    Never used the stuff and I never will.

    That said, the "war on drugs" has cost us far too much money, ruined far too many lives, choked our justice system, and accomplished exactly nothing.

    Legalize it, tax it, regulate it. It'll put drug dealers out of business so fast your heads will spin.

  • Midvaliean MIDVALE, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 9:16 a.m.

    @Twin Lights
    I have the complete opposite experience. Just Saying.

  • george of the jungle goshen, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 9:26 a.m.

    I prefer hemp twine over plastic

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 9:29 a.m.

    @procuradorfiscal
    " Marijuana is a dangerous drug. As dangerous and heroin, meth, and cocaine? Yes, because it leads people to ALL of them. And, marijuana kills people every day. "

    The reason marijuana is a gateway drug is because it's the least dangerous illegal drug. Getting it now requires some sort of connection to illegal sources that then could push other things. If it were legalized it would largely eliminate the establishment of that kind of connection and would be much less of a gateway drug.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 9:59 a.m.

    Legalize it... just as long as I don't have to pay for their rehab and pay to support their drop-out stoner life-style. And as long as we can be assured that the will be prosecuted for driving under the influence, and won't receive unemployment when their job performance does to Pot (little pun there).

    We put Bus Divers and Train Engineers in jail who operate their vehicles under the influence... We need to do the same for people driving their car under the influence.

    Would you want your Doctor, pilot, air traffic controllers, or any work force coming to work under the influence? No... you would fire them before they made a serious mistake and got your company in serious trouble.

    Yet when we legalize it we are indirectly saying all these things are fine.

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 10:43 a.m.

    Ya!
    Because we can all see what a horrible, rotten, place Canada has become!

    [sarcasm off]

  • Anti Bush-Obama Chihiuahua, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 11:34 a.m.

    I agree. Legalize Marijuana which can also be use for medicine. I have seen it treat cancer with my own eyes. The reason it's illegal is because it feeds money to the courts and prisons.

  • Anti Bush-Obama Chihiuahua, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 11:37 a.m.

    Don't legalize Marijuana which is less harmful than cigarettes and impossible to overdose on. But legalize psychotropic drugs which are addictive and deadly if abused.? Yeah that makes a lot of sense.

  • Anti Bush-Obama Chihiuahua, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 11:45 a.m.

    Marijuana criminalization is as silly as prohibition was because like prohibition, it just makes the criminals richer. I don't believe in this gateway drug garbage and it's totally unproven. It's true that marijuana can be abused just like anything else we consume. But that's not reason to make it illegal.

  • RedShirtMIT Cambridge, MA
    Nov. 14, 2013 12:01 p.m.

    I hate to break it to all of you Pot heads, but there already are multiple forms of legalized Marijuana extract based drugs on the market. Please tell us what you really want. With all of the legal drugs based on Marijuana, we know that you are not looking to get legitimate uses legalized. Tell us, why you really want it legalized.

  • Midvaliean MIDVALE, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 12:16 p.m.

    @RedShirt
    Different strokes for different folks. Not all of us want to have a drink to unwind. Its not everyone's cup of tea, but why deny those who enjoy and hurt no one.

  • airnaut Everett, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 12:17 p.m.

    2 bits
    Cottonwood Heights, UT

    procuradorfiscal
    Tooele, UT

    ========

    8% of Americans smoked pot at least once in the last 30 days.

    Those are your friends, neighbors, co-workers, families...
    You probably would not recognize a pot smoker if can right up and blew smoke in your face.

    For a number so "high" [pun],
    I don't know of any of this marijuana killing people every day with the littered bodies, and blood of many thousands of innocent people creating slaves, widows, and orphans - as you claim.
    Why is it not being reported in the News?

    BTW --
    I have not heard of one single instance of a Potheads doing what you claim.

    It's the legal distribution and the money that goes along with the black-market that is making all the horror stories you are so afraid of.

  • Curmudgeon Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 1:24 p.m.

    I don't think anyone is arguing for unrestricted legal access to marijuana. Treat it like alcohol and tobacco: legalize, regulate, and tax it like crazy to pay for prevention, treatment, law enforcement, education, roads, and other worthy state enterprises that non-users want someone else to pay for. We could even create another bureaucracy, the Division of Marijuana Control (like the DABC), and Utah legislators could spend their time figuring out how to set up state-run MJ stores and MJ curtains (which, of course, would be made of hemp), instead of idiotic unconstitutional message bills, new ways to restrict abortions, and keeping wolves out of Utah. Heck, even allow purveyors to advertise the stuff on TV and at sporting events (just like beer); the competition with booze and ED cures would be a boon for the media. Think of the entertaining Super Bowl ads!

  • Happy Valley Heretic Orem, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 2:29 p.m.

    RedShirtMIT said: "I hate to break it to all of you Pot heads, but there already are multiple forms of legalized Marijuana extract based drugs on the market. "

    My brother has a prescription for marinol one of your extract based drugs, for a one month prescription of 60 pills is over $1,100. Something your grandmother could grow along side her tomatoes with little or no skill fetches a price more obscene then the worst drug dealers would dream of charging.

    Besides like someone else already pointed out, not everyone wants their drugs in religiously accepted pill form, nor do they need the excuse.

    It's a drug more akin to caffeine than anything else, although far less toxic.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 2:47 p.m.

    Curmudgeon,
    Who would pay the employees salaries, build the office space, buy the phones, computers and office equipment, etc, for this new Division of Marijuana Control you want??

    Hint... It won't be the hempies, it would be the hard working tax paying people like you and me who DON'T use pot.

    You claim nobody wants unrestricted legal access... But the same people who push Marijuana legalization DO complain that access to Alcohol is controlled in Utah. If they push for liberalizing alcohol laws... why would they not eventually push for the same for Marijuana?

    IMO medical use is one thing, recreational use is another. We don't need to condone it just to make the hemp-heads more comfortable. I have no problem if people with medical needs have access. But we all know that States that have opened it for medical use KNOW it's also going to used for recreational use also. There's no way around that.

    So.. if YOU will offer to fund the new bureaucracy to manage Hemp usage and guarantee it won't be taken out of the budget for important things like education... Go ahead and legalize it.

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 3:06 p.m.

    Brigham Young encouraged the Mormon settlers to grow hemp and poppies,
    for their medicines and their ropes...

    I reckon because they were free to choose for themselves,
    and there was no $800 Billion a year Pharmecuetical Industry to control and manipulate the passage of laws favoring THEIR products by lobbyists and political briberies back in 1847.

    Don't you think we should at least level the playing field,
    and allow the Drug Cartels to go around the Doctors and advertise directly to the non-Doctor consumers on Television?

  • RedShirtMIT Cambridge, MA
    Nov. 14, 2013 4:00 p.m.

    To "Happy Valley Heretic" so then you agree that we already have legalized marijuana. So the question still stands, why do we need to legalize smoking it?

    Actually the effects of marijuana is more akin to getting plastered.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 4:25 p.m.

    airnaut,
    Re: "You probably would not recognize a pot smoker if can right up and blew smoke in your face"....

    I know people use it (currently illegally). And I see people openly using it right here in little old SLC Utah all the time. And I can tell when somebody's high without them having to blow smoke in my face. What does that have to do with anything?

    Should it be OK to drive drunk if nobody can tell you're drunk unless you barf it into their face?

    ---

    Re: "I don't know of any of this marijuana killing people every day with the littered bodies, and blood of many thousands of innocent people creating slaves, widows, and orphans - as you claim"...

    Show me where I made these claims. I didn't. That's called a strawman. I don't answer questions about things I never said.

    ---

    I don't know what horror stories you are talking about and attributing to me....

    I never said Marijuana killed anybody... I just don't want to pay for the social ills that come from a "Wasted" life-style.

  • Anti Bush-Obama Chihiuahua, 00
    Nov. 14, 2013 4:29 p.m.

    The country may as well outlaw all herbs and plant while they are at it. That is how ludicrous this law is. But Obama nor anybody on the Republican side of things seems to want to make this a reality. They are trying a bunch of dirty tricks in Colorado and Washington to reverse the legalization of Marijuana.

  • Curmudgeon Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 4:39 p.m.

    2 bits:

    I see that humor sails over your head. But on a more serious note, if pot were legal, regulated, and taxed appropriately, there would be no need for a separate bureaucracy; the DABC could change its name to something more generic, and expand its functions to include regulation of pot the same way it regulates booze; any added expense could be covered by the pot tax.

    With all due respect, why should pot be treated differently than alcohol? Both are mind-altering, nutritionally useless substances, which may be addictive to a percentage of the population, may lead to abuse of other substances, and may contribute to socially unacceptable (even criminal) behavior in some users. Alcohol is good for certain medicinal purposes (e.g. external cleansing), and MJ may be good for other medicinal purposes (e.g. pain relief). Making sale, possession, or abuse of either one illegal contributes to the expense and other burdens of the criminal justice system, which we all pay for. One can argue for greater or lesser governmental regulation of these substances, but it is hard to argue with consistency that they should not be treated similarly.

  • Happy Valley Heretic Orem, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 5:45 p.m.

    RedShirtMIT Said: "Actually the effects of marijuana is more akin to getting plastered."

    I've Never been plastered.
    Are you speaking from experiences while smoking Marijuana? or are you just making things up again?

    Curmudgeon said: "With all due respect, why should pot be treated differently than alcohol?
    Both are mind-altering, nutritionally useless substances."

    Smoking it has no nutritional value, however Hemp seeds contains:

    * All 20 amino acids, including the 9 essential amino acids (EAAs) our bodies cannot produce.
    * A high protein percentage of the simple proteins that strengthen immunity and fend off toxins.
    * Nature’s highest botanical source of essential fatty acid, with more essential fatty acid than flax or any other nut or seed oil.
    * A perfect 3:1 ratio of Omega-6 Linoleic Acid and Omega-3 Linolenic Acid – for cardiovascular health and general strengthening of the immune system.
    * A superior vegetarian source of protein considered easily digestible.
    * The richest known source of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids.

  • one vote Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 6:54 p.m.

    End the nanny state control. Free is free, not just freedom to have no health insurance. States right issue.

  • mark Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 14, 2013 9:09 p.m.

    Isn't that the truth one vote? Some of the most virulent defenders of liberty and freedom (or at least their idea of it) and small government do not hesitate for one second before championing the absolutely huge monstrosity of government that it takes to maintain the war on drugs: the drug court system, the police dedicated to the war on drugs, the raids in the middle of the night, the undercover operations, the DEA, the Federal intrusion into states rights, the massive prison system to house drug offenders, the parole system to deal with them after release.

    And this failed system is supported a hundred percent by the very conservatives that call for small unobtrusive government and freedom. And they don't even have the good sense to be embarrassed by the disconnect.

    - "I just don't want to pay for the social ills that come from a "Wasted" life-style."

    2bits, are you under the impression that people do not use marijuana right now? Why not tax it, and use that and reductions in costs from reduced enforcement to pay for any societal ills arising from it? (Which will be far, far less then societal ills from alcohol.)

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Nov. 15, 2013 9:59 a.m.

    @liberal larry:
    After all, a lot people claimed that legalizing gay marriage would usher in the demise of straight unions..."

    They didn't say it would be the demise of straight unions... They said it would be the demise of the institution of marriage, altogether.

    Gay marriages will eventually open the door to all kinds of marriage arrangements from polygamy to incest and adult/child. There'd be no reason to not allow any combination that can be conjured... else discrimination could be charged.... the same discrimination now felt by homosexuals unable to marry.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Nov. 15, 2013 10:04 a.m.

    @Anti Bush-Obama:
    "Don't legalize Marijuana which is less harmful than cigarettes and impossible to overdose on. But legalize psychotropic drugs which are addictive and deadly if abused.? Yeah that makes a lot of sense."

    I say, legalize it all... just don't issue driver licenses to users. And if they're caught driving, throw them in jail for, say, ten years as punishment.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Nov. 15, 2013 10:08 a.m.

    @airnaut:
    "8% of Americans smoked pot at least once in the last 30 days."

    Well, we know for sure that at least two United States presidents admittedly did... and worse. Unfortunately, it seemed to affect their critical thinking capacities.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Nov. 15, 2013 10:29 a.m.

    @Anti Bush-Obama:
    "But Obama nor anybody on the Republican side of things seems to want to make this a reality."

    That's too bad. Obama and his Democrat hordes could garnish additional millions of new democrat votes by legalizing the stuff. In fact, he doesn't even have to get the US Congress to act... just call off his hunting dogs and issue Executive Orders much like he's done with illegal immigrants.

  • ConservativeCommonTater West Valley City, UT
    Nov. 17, 2013 10:58 a.m.

    Weed can't be legalized, there is too much money in prohibiting it. In 2010 there were about 870,000 people arrested, tried, incarcerated and fined for the possession and use of the devil's weed. Think of all the jobs that created and of the benefits of "private prisons."

    The only way weed will become legal or at least decriminalized is if the financial benefit exceeds the financial benefits of making it illegal.

  • BostonLDS Salt lake City, UT
    Nov. 18, 2013 12:00 p.m.

    I have seen what marijuana did to one of my family members, and for that reason I will be forever against legalization of marijuana. It may not be as deadly as some of the other drugs out there, but it certainly changes behavior.

    I also don't agree with the logic here. DWIs cause a ton of deaths each year, so lets make marijuana legal, so that MORE deaths can be caused by DWIs? Drug cartels are making money off it so lets turn our government into a drug cartel? And which "petty crimes" are you talking about. Growth? Distribution? I am of the belief that growing and selling mind-altering drugs is pretty heinous, especially when a lot of those buying marijuana are teenagers.

    You say yourself that you don't use marijuana, and yet you are okay with it being available, legally, for anyone to buy? Because once it's legal, it won't just be the burn outs and losers who use, everyone will think it is a good idea. I personally don't think selling out our society for a few tax dollars is worth it.

  • brotherJonathan SLC, UT
    Nov. 21, 2013 9:49 a.m.

    there are many, many reports about the portugal experiment.every single report says the same thing. portugal's total decriminalization works and does away with
    unfair and unjust laws against people's right to personal freedom and liberty.
    it's only logical, rational thinking. just like making alcoholics criminals. unjust, unconstitutional. and made criminals out of citizens wanting power over their own choices, alcohol/drugs.
    the drug law is a lie, a deception to force bondage on the usa.
    the law does not make us safer, just the opposite. it creates a black market and criminal enterprise while instituting an unlawful
    monopoly for pharmacies/doctors/hospitals.
    monopolies are unconstitutional because of their unfair
    power over individual citizens forced into an unwritten contract.
    (unjust enhancement; look it up).
    go to google look up portugal's drug experiment for yourselves. high school kids drug use dropped to 25-28% where just like usa kids tried drugs over 50%.
    do we love our children more than status quo?

    self-controlled, self regulating, un-constitutional entity.
    created by "controlled substance acts/laws".
    'prescription medicine' is a morality law. morality laws are un-constitutional.
    not to be confused with criminal laws, which are constitutional.