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Protesters target Wells Fargo annual meeting

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  • toosmartforyou Farmington, UT
    April 23, 2013 7:19 p.m.

    “It isn’t for everyone,” she said.

    That pretty well sums up a lot of banking practices. They aren't content with a healthy rate of return, they want an exhorbitant one.

    Reminds me of healthcare insurance, gasoline prices and local income/property taxes.

  • Truthseeker SLO, CA
    April 23, 2013 9:53 p.m.

    Larry Delassus, a 62-year-old disabled veteran, died in court Dec 2012 while continuing a three-year battle against Wells Fargo for foreclosing on his Hermosa Beach home – a battle he had to fight even though court records show he paid his mortgage two months ahead of schedule and also paid his property taxes in advance.

    Wells Fargo called Delassus’s death “tragic,” but it was Wells Fargo that put Delassus into default when the bank mistakenly thought Delassus was behind in his property taxes. In fact, the bank was using an incorrect assessor’s parcel number that corresponded to Delassus’s neighbor’s home.

    Delassus’s attorney and close friend, Anthony Trujillo of Redondo Beach, working the case on contingency, discovered the bank error and informed the bank. Wells Fargo acknowledged the error, fixed Delassus’s credit history but still proceeded with selling Delassus’s home at auction, according to deposition testimony and court documents.

  • DN Subscriber 2 SLC, UT
    April 23, 2013 10:44 p.m.

    No one is being forced to make deposits in Wells Fargo, or to take loans from them. It is a free market, and these "protesters" are free to get loans from people who will give loans to anyone, charge no interest, and quickly run out of money to loan anyone.

    Conversely, the protesters are free to invest their money (from what source, one might wonder as most seem to be professional demonstrators, not real working people) in banks that pay no interest and charge no fees--- you know, so they don't profit off the people they are loaning money to.

    Sounds like the same folks who show up for all sorts of economic events.

    Takers, not makers, as far as I can see.