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Timothy R. Clark: The CEO's boiling hormones and a river of fire

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  • Red Salt Lake City, UT
    Nov. 19, 2012 7:47 a.m.

    I agree with you!

    What is worse is that so many people who don't want to tame their "river of fire" follow it up by killing the baby that comes by it. Trying to justify it by calling it a "womans choice".

    The rationalization only masks the pain.

    Everybody loses by their lack of self control.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Nov. 19, 2012 9:44 a.m.

    Red, adults, especially those outside utah, use protection.

  • RedShirt USS Enterprise, UT
    Nov. 19, 2012 11:38 a.m.

    Why does the liberal media care about this case? When it came out that Bill Clinton cheated on his wife, they didn't care very much at all.

    So again, why do they care now, what is reason behind making adultery something to cause a CEO to resign?

  • Mountanman Hayden, ID
    Nov. 19, 2012 2:34 p.m.

    @ RedShirt. Its because the General is a conservative! Liberals no not expect much from their own but they demand so much more from all others.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    Nov. 20, 2012 3:48 p.m.

    For many or even most men, insisting on monogamy, especially when there are long absences away from their wife, is like insisting that a square peg fit propery into a round hole. If we try to force generals (for example) to live this way, this is liable to cause enough frustration and unhappiness, that their performance as a general would suffer.

  • jmason San Diego, CA
    Dec. 5, 2012 3:07 p.m.

    An interesting article...but not very true. Dwight Eisenhower had a mistress, before he was prez and all during the time he was prez; and thousands, hundreds of thousands "put their lives on the line" for him. FDR had a mistress while he was prez, George Herbert Walker Bush III had a mistress--before he was prez.

  • jmason San Diego, CA
    Dec. 5, 2012 3:18 p.m.

    All through history, not many great leaders have been faithful to their wives. I don't know know that fidelity to one's spouse has much to do with "great leadership". Certainly it's preferable, it's the ideal we'd all like to see, but it doesn't happen very often. There are lots of examples of poor leaders who were faithful to their wives, just as there are examples of very good leaders who were not. Jimmy Carter was perhaps the most saintly U.S. prez of the 20th century, and he was never unfaithful to Rosalyn...but it is generally acknowledged he wasn't a very effective prez, not a very good leader. George W. Bush was/is faithful to his wife (I assume he is), now and during his presidency, but he got us into the two worst and most costly wars of our history, one of them completely unnecessary; and then we all know what had happened to the economy by the time he'd left office.

  • jmason San Diego, CA
    Dec. 5, 2012 3:20 p.m.

    The point of my post is that "private virtue" and "public virtue" are different commodities--regrettable but true. Great leaders tend to have a lot of the public kind of virtue, but sometimes not as much of the private variety.