Quantcast
Opinion

In our opinion: Kids count

Comments

Return To Article
  • Really??? Kearns, UT
    July 1, 2013 8:48 a.m.

    This adds more weight to the theory that our legislature wants to keep a certain segment of our communities from having better educational opportunities. I am disappointed once again in our elected officials. It's time for sweeping change. Let's get rid of them all and start fresh with people who care about our children's futures.

  • Terrie Bittner Warminster, PA
    July 1, 2013 9:47 a.m.

    Children do not need more time in institutions. They need more time with parents. The key to ending poverty is through the parents. We need to develop programs that teach the parents how to care for and educate their children. When I worked with low-income children, I quickly saw I could not really change their lives. Once they were out of my reach, their lives stopped changing. Studies show that the gains made in these preschools disappear when they go to regular schools. Their progress always depends on how good their teacher is that year. If we educate the parents--teach them literacy and parenting and show them how to have an education-rich home, the children won't be dependent on outside influences. The parents will get better jobs and the children will have good lives before they grow up--not after.

  • Howard Beal Provo, UT
    July 1, 2013 11:47 a.m.

    Here is the innovative education solution: get our children out of elementary classes of 30 or more and secondary classes of 40 or more. Reduce class size and teachers can go from managers to actual educators and that will solve a lot of things right there.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    July 1, 2013 11:52 a.m.

    Really???
    8:48

    How does this article, "add more weight to the theory that our legislature wants to keep a certain segment of our communities from having better educational opportunities"???

    I thought it said we were going pretty good!

  • Really??? Kearns, UT
    July 1, 2013 1:41 p.m.

    @2 Bits

    "During the last legislative session, Sen. Aaron Osmond, R-South Jordan, sponsored a bill that would have provided this type of early education without costing the state. The bill would have gotten willing private investors to invest $10 million in preschool programs. The state then would have repaid the money only if the program could demonstrate long-term success.

    The effort failed, but it demonstrated exactly the type of innovation that will be needed to improve education within the constraints of limited budgets."

  • 2 bit Cottonwood Heights, UT
    July 1, 2013 2:47 p.m.

    Really???,

    How does this article, "add more weight to the theory that our legislature wants to keep a certain segment of our communities from having better educational opportunities"???

    I don't see anything in the article that says that... I guess you see what you WANT to see.