Quantcast
Opinion

In our opinion: End the abuse of LGBT teens in Utah

Comments

Return To Article
  • ECR Burke, VA
    June 12, 2012 4:58 a.m.

    Thank you for this thoughtful essay. After all is said and one, regardless of our religious persuasion and no matter where we stand on the issues of the day, respect for each other is the most important consideration that is needed. If you believe we are all God's children that concept should already be engraved on your thoughts. If you don't believe in a higher power then, it seems, fostering a respectful and loving society in this life would be equally as important.

    Thanks again for elevating this important issue.

  • Linguist Silver Spring, MD
    June 12, 2012 5:10 a.m.

    Wow. Bravo to the Deseret News.

    Though now well into my middle age, I remember well the absolute terror I went through as a youth, increasingly realizing I was gay, increasingly isolated and scared. I knew no other gay people, and had never even talked to anyone else about what I was going through, so intense was the fear and the certain knowledge of ostracism that I kept quiet. I doubt that a day went by when I didn't pray for the "change" that so many non-gay people insist is possible--but which, at least in my case, proved elusive.

    I can't know for sure how my life would have evolved had I read an editorial like this one back then. Such editorials simply didn't exist anywhere.

    I have to think it would have helped. A lot.

    And maybe, just maybe, it will help some kid today to understand that we all deserve love and support.

    Thank you, Deseret News, from the bottom of my heart.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    June 12, 2012 5:13 a.m.

    Anyone who looks objectively at this issue, has to be open to the possibility that people can be born gay.

    Unfortunately, the religious can not accept that because it causes too many conflicts with their religious beliefs.

    So, just like the flat-earthers, the 6000 year old earth, and the evolution deniers, they cling to their Sunday teachings which fly in the face of common sense and scientific study.

    I am not gay. But, I cannot fathom anything happening in my life (or anyones life) which would affect my gender attraction.

    Can anyone give me a scenario that may have caused them to become gay?

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    June 12, 2012 6:29 a.m.

    Well said. Thank you.

  • Vin Harrisville, UT
    June 12, 2012 7:08 a.m.

    Excellent! Thank you so much! It is so important for us to make changes as a society in this regard.

  • ECR Burke, VA
    June 12, 2012 7:25 a.m.

    Joe Blow said, "Unfortunately, the religious can not accept that ..."

    I think you are painting a broad brush here that simply isn't true. Didn't you see the active Mormons marching in the Gay Pride parade in SLC. Don't you understand that "religious" people all around the world are standing arm in arm with LGBT folks in support of giving them civil and human rights?

    Yes, there are many who think they are religious who are actively working in the opposite direction. Somehow they have rationalized that treating others with less respect than they would expect for themselves falls in line with their theology and religious traditions. But it just a rationalization. Treating anyone as less than human does not match any religious tradition that I am aware of.

  • counsellorneil UK, 00
    June 12, 2012 8:34 a.m.

    I too welcome this article. I feel that some members (plus some other Christians) sometimes use the scriptures to justify their own prejudices. Unfortunately this is not limited to SLC. The same occurs in the UK. We cannot justify any hatred, bullying or abuse of anyone, regardless of their sexual orientation, or anything else that may be seen as an alternative lifestyle, that appears off centre to LDS teachings. If we really listened to each other, without judgement, what a blessing it would be to and for us all. Not listening to see how the other ought to change but listening to really understand. "It is as though he listened and such listening as his enfolds us in silence in which at last we begin to hear what we are meant to be." Lao-Tse. It is interesting, to me, that the Saviour never condemned same-sex relationships in the Gospels or the Book of Mormon or the Doctrine and Covenants. Or am I mistaken in that? It seems it was later teachings that did so. Could a change come in the future similar to how at one time the Priesthood was not available to all?

  • Ben H Clearfield, UT
    June 12, 2012 8:47 a.m.

    As someone who was bullied extensively in school, I have trouble sympathizing with any certain group. It is always the strong taking advantage of the weak no matter their race, religion, national origin or sexual orientation. The reason is happened to me in when I was growing up is because teachers and administration were afraid that they would look bad for punishing the popular kids, the athletic kids and the kids that were well-connected politically. It still happens in school today, if what my kids tell me is true. We should simply stand up to all bullying and not set aside special classes. When it comes to bullying and abuse, there is only the strong and the weak the bullies and the victims. If there were no gay kids in high school, there would still be victims of bullying.

  • isrred Logan, UT
    June 12, 2012 8:52 a.m.

    " We should simply stand up to all bullying and not set aside special classes. When it comes to bullying and abuse, there is only the strong and the weak the bullies and the victims."

    Nobody disagrees with what you are saying--all bullying should be addressed. The point is that LGBT youth are far more likely to experience bullying--and far more likely to attempt suicide--than their straight peers. All bullying is wrong, but to put your head in the sand and not recognize that some groups ARE more vulnerable than others doesn't help tackle the issue at all.

  • BCA Murrieta, CA
    June 12, 2012 9:26 a.m.

    Goly, gee. I can't think of any reason why gays are mistreated so badly in Utah. Well, maybe one.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    June 12, 2012 9:28 a.m.

    Chad Griffin, head of the Human Rights Campaign, said, "I don't believe that there is any church, any school, or any set of parents that want to intentionally inflict harm on our young people…" True, and yet one must assume that…the incidents of taunting or bullying in Utah are, to at least some degree, a reflection of attitudes found within some of the homes where the bullies live.

    ===============

    Bigotry, Intolerance, Bullying, ect.

    They are learn it in the HOME.

    And Utah has nearly twice the National average of this kind of intolerant behavior toward others.

    WWJB?

    Who Would Jesus Bully?

    Seriously, We are trending 180 degrees - polar opposite from what we should be.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    June 12, 2012 9:32 a.m.

    Re: "The survey may not be statistically accurate."

    Duh. Unlike real science, this "study" amounts to nothing more than a publicized gripe session. With no attempt, whatever, to separate acceptance of persons from acceptance of their life choices and lifestyle.

    Giving undue credence to this sort of pseudoscientific tripe, and taking us to task for behaviors that, not only have not been shown to exist, but which are inimical to our culture, is just another abandonment of reason and proper journalistic standards.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    June 12, 2012 9:59 a.m.

    "I don't believe that there is any church, any school, or any set of parents that want to intentionally inflict harm on our young people…"

    I disagree, for instance there's video of that one pastor in North Carolina who expressed support for putting gay people in concentration camps. We know where the Westboro Baptist Church stands on gay people.

    Anyway, kudos to the Deseret News for this editorial.

  • John20000 Cedar Hills, UT
    June 12, 2012 10:00 a.m.

    @BCA: Claiming this is a Utah-only problem is a weak argument and I am sure you didn't mean it this way but, insinuating that Mormons treat these people badly as part of their religion sounds a little ignorant of the Mormon culture.

  • counsellorneil UK, 00
    June 12, 2012 10:05 a.m.

    procuradorfiscal - do you really think that you can separate acceptance of persons and their life choices? If a person is gay (or different in any other way) how can you accept them as a person whilst at the same time be overtly critical of their life choices and lifestyle? You may not agree with a person's life choices and lifestyle but the moment you start being publicly critical of what they do you are starting to bully them as an individual. And that is where the abuse, etc. comes from, people saying gays are wrong, evil, etc. Listening for understanding and them accepting differences is one thing. Railing against differences is not right and not what Christ would do. Your words sound as if you feel under threat? If same-sex attraction is really so wrong why didn't the Saviour himself say so in the Gospels? See my comment above.

    "taking us to task for behaviors that, not only have not been shown to exist, but which are inimical to our culture" - to understand you, please can you explain how have they been shown not to exist? How are they inimical (harmful or hostile) to your culture?

  • George Bronx, NY
    June 12, 2012 10:24 a.m.

    @procuradorfiscal
    counsellmoell is right, let me give you an example closer to home (keeping n mind I really do not feel this way) what if i where to say, I accept and love my LDS brothers but i cannot accept their life style choice to use the book of mormon as if it where the same as the bible and I cannot accept their misuse of the bible to justify their behavior choice to be LDS and don't you dare call be a bigot because I love the LDS people just not their behaviors and lifestyle choice and I don't think they should be given special rights for it.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    June 12, 2012 12:04 p.m.

    Re: "You may not agree with a person's life choices and lifestyle but the moment you start being publicly critical of what they do you are starting to bully them as an individual."

    First off, no one but the critic mentioned being "publicly" critical, but let's lay that aside for the moment. Positing that public non-acceptance of behaviors with which one disagrees constitutes bullying, is the same as suggesting it's somehow immoral or uncivilized to oppose ANY behavior, no matter how destructive.

    Which is, of course, disingenuous. Unless the writer is willing to admit LGBT activists, who are more than willing to disagree with me, even publicly, are bullies.

    Second, no one said that bullying behaviors have been shown not to exist. But the "study" cited assumes they do, merely because a tiny sample asserts as much, without even a valid operational definition as to what constitutes bullying. And the comments demonstrate how dangerous that is.

    Finally, while sticking up for decency is part of our culture, so is living and letting live. Utah has among the Nation's lowest statistics regarding advocacy violence.

  • Ranch Here, UT
    June 12, 2012 12:35 p.m.

    @Proc:

    "Finally, while sticking up for decency is part of our culture, so is living and letting live. Utah has among the Nation's lowest statistics regarding advocacy violence."

    --

    Yes, live and let live, that's why Utahn's supported and voted for Amendment 3 and why Mormons participated so heavily in California's Proposition 8. Live and let Live. Um, no.

    This study indicates that Utah's violence rate is not among the lowest in the nation, at least not in this category.

  • ouisc Farmington, UT
    June 12, 2012 12:42 p.m.

    Most of our teens accept their peers for who they are, despite sexual orientation. But we still have some work to do, because a high percentage of our gay teens still feel some level of persecution. Keep teaching tolerance and acceptance of multiple sexual orientations in our homes and churches!

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    June 12, 2012 12:53 p.m.

    George & counsellorneil

    I think you may be overstating the case. To disagree with another's lifestyle is not tantamount to bullying. I have lived most of my life in areas where folks do not necessarily accept or agree with my choices as a member of the church. But that is not bullying.

    I do not agree with many choices people make from drinking and drugs to most divorce. But that is not bullying. It is disagreeing. Nothing more.

    If being gay is innate, other things are as well (addiction is often genetically traced and, according to those who suffer from it, can be stronger than sexual drive). Still, as a society we often disagree on these things.

    The issue is how we disagree. Not that we do.

    If bullying is wrong and if disagreement is bullying, then we as a society must never disagree. Ever.

    Democratic debate goes out the window and freedom follows.

  • VIDAR Murray, UT
    June 12, 2012 1:19 p.m.

    Maybe the reason that the LGBT kids are depressed and feel guilty, is because they know in their heart and soul that what they are doing is not right.
    Bullying is wrong and needs to be confronted and stopped in schools.
    I do feel that LGBT adults teach the LGBT kids to take on a victim mentality in many ways.
    Not saying it does not happen, but it is not only gay kids that are bullied.

  • George Bronx, NY
    June 12, 2012 1:45 p.m.

    @twin lights

    you are right there clearly is a difference between bulling and debate. There is even a difference though much smaller I would say between bulling and using the law to restrict basic protections and rights. How would you feel if these places you lived decided that they would not protect your right to practice your religion, offer basic protections against people discriminating against you in the work place and housing and not refuse to recognize your temple marriages?

  • Mike Richards South Jordan, Utah
    June 12, 2012 1:47 p.m.

    What does the word "accept" mean? Do I have to "accept" a lifestyle that I know will bring misery and hopelessness to those who live it? Do I have to "accept" a lifestyle that requires that those who believe in it "recruit" teenagers even when that "recruitment" destroys the lives of the "recruited"?

    We have moral laws that we can choose to obey or that we can choose to ignore. Those who ignore those laws will feel the pains of disobedience. Who are we to try to take away the pains of disobedience from those who would choose to disobey moral laws?

    We reap what we sow. Those who sow mischief will reap mischief. God allows us agency to choose what we will do with our lives but He does not prevent us from receiving the consequences of our choices.

    Teenagers should be protected from foolish acts that will ruin their lives. They should be safeguarded from those predators who would use them and abuse them. Teenagers are children and as children they still need to be protected from adults who would lie to them and ruin their lives.

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    June 12, 2012 2:14 p.m.

    George,

    Let's lay aside for a moment the issue of marriage (too hot - you and I will both run out of comment space).

    Though I get your point, bullying and legal restrictions are not really analogous. One is how I act. The other is how society as a whole does. We often treat the actions of the societal group differently than the actions of the individual.

    Over the last decade or two, the law has increasingly protected the rights of the LGBT community. Not saying it is now perfect, but the trend is clear reference housing and jobs.

    But I would doubt that most teens who feel bullied feel that way because of housing or job situations. I assume it is because of how others (friends, family, peers, teachers) treat them, talk to them, etc. That is what needs to change.

    BTW, I have a good friend who was kept from an apartment because she is LDS. No, I am not saying that two wrongs make a right or that it is worse or even the same for LDS folks, just noting that religious discrimination is not dead yet either.

  • Darrel Eagle Mountain, UT
    June 12, 2012 2:25 p.m.

    @ Mike Richards

    There is a difference between accept and bully. Nothing Christ ever taught, nor any of His prophets authorize to treat anyone as second class, regardless of the lifestyle they choose to live.

    Accept can simply mean, I disagree with your choices, but I understand they are your choices and you can make them. Ever hear "I teach them correct principles and they govern themselves."?

  • Mike Richards South Jordan, Utah
    June 12, 2012 2:58 p.m.

    @Darrel,

    What about property rights? What does the 5th Amendment say: "nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation."

    Can the government force me to rent my property to someone whom I would rather not rent to?

    Can the government force me to serve hesomeone in my business whom I would rather not serve?

    Who gave the government that right? Where is it stated in the Constitution?

    Granted, kindness is not defined in the Constitution. We, who are Christian, believe in a higher law, but will government force Christ to allow entrance into His kingdom those whom Christ has not qualified?

    You seem to be saying that our property is not our own and that we are all pawns of the government, a government that derives its powers from the governed. If we, the people, hold all the power and all the authority, then where did the government get the right to tell us how we would rent our property and how we would decide who would be renters?

  • Darrel Eagle Mountain, UT
    June 12, 2012 3:17 p.m.

    @Mike,

    I never brought up property at all. But...

    "Can the government force me to rent my property to someone whom I would rather not rent to?" Depends on the reasons...because they are LDS? Because someone offered you more?

    You cite the 5th ammendment, which also takes about life and liberty, before property. Government has the job to protect both of those, so it protects my rights to be LDS and to not be denied a roof over my head because I choose to be so.

    Again, with the business, if you can come up with a professional bona fide reason, no. However, the government can control Interstate commerce i.e. how business is conducted.

    Christ can allow whom he desires into His kingdom. He has earned that right. What He has not given us is the authorization to treat anybody with any less than the love He has shown us. Let God judge them, that is not our place.

  • George Bronx, NY
    June 12, 2012 3:50 p.m.

    @twin lights
    I can agree with you they are different but it does influence the kids I work with because it is another reminder that they are viewed as less then, which frankly some bullies use as an excuse for their bulling behaviors. I really was not trying to show disrespect for your religious beliefs and if I did I do apologize. I was attempting encourage you to step into the shoes of the LGBT community in a small way and see it from their perspective. Living in NY , though I am not LDS myself , I am acutely aware of discriminatory attitudes towards the LDS church and other religious minority groups. It is a little strange but I often find myself trying to straighten out misconceptions about the LDS church and while a lot of what I see and hear is more a miss understanding of your religion there are definitely those that would not think twice about discriminating against a member of the LDS church. I hope social attitudes continue to evolve towards increased respect towards both the LGBTQ and religious minorities. thank you for the civil discourse are rare commodity in todays market of ideas.

  • LValfre CHICAGO, IL
    June 12, 2012 4:32 p.m.

    Obviously Mike Richards would not rent to a homosexual if he was a landlord. Wonder if he would rent to blacks back in the 60's and 70's?

    You're not making a good show of yourself Mr. Richards. Best read that bible again and start praying for answers because from what I'm reading you're misguided at best.

  • Linguist Silver Spring, MD
    June 12, 2012 8:16 p.m.

    "Maybe the reason that the LGBT kids are depressed and feel guilty, is because they know in their heart and soul that what they are doing is not right."

    With respect, I don't know what you think I was "doing" during the many years in which I struggled with my sexual orientation, but for the record, I was celibate-- completely.

    Sexual orientation isn't a behavior. The depression and guilt I felt had nothing to do with knowing I was "doing" something that wasn't right.

    Rather, there was a profound fear that I was something that others despised or made fun of. I didn't "earn" that. I simply recognized that I had a trait that others found evil. And there was simply nothing I could do about it except pretend that I didn't have that trait.

    That's the source of the unhappiness and the stress and the misery. It is often referred to as "the Closet."

    Peace.

  • Henry Drummond San Jose, CA
    June 12, 2012 8:28 p.m.

    This article will do more good that you can imagine. I've worked with these kids for more than twenty years. I've also been shocked by those who somehow see violence as being acceptable when you encounter something you don't understand. Maya Angelo expressed similar sentiments to those expressed in the editorial. "Hatred is an acid that destroys the vessel that contains it."

  • wdtony Alexandria, KY
    June 13, 2012 12:10 a.m.

    Utah seems to be the private TEEN TORTURE capital of America. How many innocent kids are locked up in re-education camps presently? Tens of thousands, I suspect.

    Provo Canyon School, Diamond Ranch Academy, Discovery Academy, Teen Help (formerly WWASPS) ET CETERA....

    These places reportedly torture kids for profit. And when kids die in these programs, no one is held accountable. That is an indication of deep corruption.

    I was locked up in a place like these programs as a teenager. It harms you in a way that no one can see and it never leaves you. When your mind breaks, it is never going back to normal.

  • Kathy. Iowa, Iowa
    June 13, 2012 7:37 a.m.

    Steps should be taken to make sure all who are bullies are stopped. A lot of these bullies are victims in their own homes and need counseling themselves.

    I don't think however that there should be a special class of victim.

    Children are bullied for being poor,overweight,learning disabled,socially inept, or physically less attractive. Why not address all these issues?

  • Gildas LOGAN, UT
    June 13, 2012 7:40 a.m.

    I suspected this might happen.

    Finally there is a move to deal with bullying in school, something that has, more or less, been a problem for ages. Then all the attention is diverted to only one class of bullying - that directed at practitioners of the LGBT lifestyles.

    Let's talk about bullying and let's expose it as wrong but let's regard straight victims of bullying as being at least equal to those not included in the LGBT agenda. I suspect there are thousands of victims of bullying being ignored because of this unequal viewing of victims.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    June 13, 2012 8:45 a.m.

    Mike Richards
    South Jordan, Utah
    @Darrel,

    Granted, kindness is not defined in the Constitution. We, who are Christian, believe in a higher law, but will government force Christ to allow entrance into His kingdom those whom Christ has not qualified?

    ===============

    Gee, I don’t know if I agree with you Bro. Richards….

    1st of all, read the Sermon on the Mount;
    2And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying,
    3Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
    4Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

    So far, these bullied kids inherit the Kingdom of Heaven and shall be comforted.
    Next, I know many Gay and Lesbian Latter-Day Saints – Temple Worthy.

    Judgement is not yours.
    Least Ye be judged by that same measure...

  • O'really Idaho Falls, ID
    June 13, 2012 9:20 a.m.

    So the assumption is that because I teach my kids right from wrong (right - self control and living the law of chastity no matter what my inclinations are, wrong- doing what feels good)that I'm encouraging bullying?

  • Really??? Kearns, UT
    June 13, 2012 9:32 a.m.

    "Children are bullied for being poor,overweight,learning disabled,socially inept, or physically less attractive. Why not address all these issues?"

    I'm sorry, but when I was growing up we thought those were the only kids who were being bullied. It was NEVER discussed that we should treat homosexual kids like everyone else. I don't remember anyone getting chastised for telling a boy to "stop acting like a girl." It seems to me one of the most popular games played at recess was Smear the Queer.

    Like Linguist mentioned, most of these LGBT kids who are bullied, who feel alone, and who are misunderstood are not sexually active. I am sure it tears them up to be reminded that it's their own fault they are depressed. They are suffering from an extreme internal conflict that is brought on by small-minded people who think they understand what is going on with the teens, but they really don't.

    It's time many of us stop thinking we know what's best for others and just love them.

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    June 13, 2012 9:44 a.m.

    George,

    First, there is no need for you to apologize. I felt no disrespect from you at all. And I appreciate your defense of LDS beliefs. Thank you.

    Second, I think that no person (whatever their challenges in life may be) should be made to feel as if they are somehow less. Given the enormity of what so many must face (in a variety of circumstances, not just LGBT) they simply do not need to start with that kind of handicap in life. They need to know they are more than adequate to the challenges ahead.

    The problem we (the LDS community) must address is what behavior we must expect from ourselves even as we deal with those with whom we disagree. As I have tried to indicate, my view is that tolerance and love do not require agreement or sanction - just love and the ability to continue to interact with those whose choices are different than our own.

    Finally, thank you as well. More can be solved with civility than without. The marketplace of ideas really cannot function without it. An understanding that our society seems to be losing.

  • Darrel Eagle Mountain, UT
    June 13, 2012 10:02 a.m.

    @ O'really

    "So the assumption is that because I teach my kids right from wrong (right - self control and living the law of chastity no matter what my inclinations are, wrong- doing what feels good)that I'm encouraging bullying?"

    ============

    No, teaching your kids right from wrong is fantastic. But most people would teach that bullying and being mean, regardless of your opinion is wrong.

  • Lasvegaspam Henderson, NV
    June 13, 2012 12:35 p.m.

    What I'm tired of is the "bullying" done to ALL children by Media, who insist on blowing the gay issue waaaaay out of proportion to reality. (See The Atlantic article last week that stated while only approximately 2.8% of the population is actually gay, our youth when surveyed report their belief that fully 25% of their friends are gay.) This is a problem! Why such a disconnection from reality? Our youth are at risk of being "taught" that they have a 1 in 4 chance of being gay!!! This is ridiculous. As a 50+ year-old it is crystal clear to me that the Media has an agenda and it is NOT in the best interest of our children.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    June 13, 2012 1:10 p.m.

    @VIDAR
    "Maybe the reason that the LGBT kids are depressed and feel guilty, is because they know in their heart and soul that what they are doing is not right."

    I'd say it's more likely that it's because they're told they're going to hell and others saying how they feel is not right. I know I probably shouldn't cite fiction but... after all, public condemnation of your love never did have a good effect on Romeo and Juliet.

  • Really??? Kearns, UT
    June 13, 2012 4:13 p.m.

    I'm sorry, but I was bullied quite a bit growing up, and my experience taught me EMPATHY for ANYONE who goes through similar painful treatment.

  • jttheawesome Scranton, PA
    June 13, 2012 7:58 p.m.

    Several people in here have stated that Jesus never mentioned same-sex attraction as being a sin, or wrong. What needs to be understood, is that The Bible, in both testaments, does condemn all sexual sin, including same-sex relationships. In Mark, chapter 10, Jesus' enemies try to entrap him with a question about divorce. In answering, Jesus answered, quoting from the Old Testament: "...from the beginning of the creation, God ‘made them male and female.’‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’; so then they are no longer two, but one flesh." (Mark 10:6-8) Right here, Jesus upholds traditional marriage relationships. Here and in numerous places in the Gospels and the rest of the New Testament, Jesus, as well as all the writers of the New Testament, uphold the veracity of the Old Testament. God has defined proper sexual relationships for all time, and while we mortals are free to choose whatever lifestyle we like, God has reserved for Himself the consequences of our choices. Don't use the Bible to justify your rebellion against God.

  • Darrel Eagle Mountain, UT
    June 14, 2012 6:19 a.m.

    @jttheawesome,

    The article isn't about the morality or immorality of homosexuality, but on bullying those kids who are. Regardless of your stance on the issue, nothing is taught that makes it right, or even tolerable for society to treat them as anything but the Sons and Daughters of God they are. Nothing authorizes those who are straight to somehow feel superior to those who are not.

    Jesus taught "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me." How we treat each other, is an indictment, for good or bad on how we would treat Him.

    Most people all share the same worries, fears. Most people love, and want to be loved. In reality all of us are much more alike, than we are different, regardless of orientation.

  • zoar63 Mesa, AZ
    June 14, 2012 6:53 p.m.

    @LDS Liberal

    "Next, I know many Gay and Lesbian Latter-Day Saints – Temple Worthy.”

    As long as they remain celibate

    The Apostle Paul saw the Lord and because of that he was converted. Apostles speak to the people the word of the Lord, anciently as well as today and Paul spoke to the Saints who were in Rome. When it came to same sex relations he did not mince any words and he was speaking as a representative of the Lord Jesus Christ. He also told what awaited if people indulged in those behaviors. You can read his discourse in the first chapter of Romans.