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City Creek shows off new retail space

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  • A1994 Centerville, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 4:22 p.m.

    @Counter Intelligence

    Way to accentuate the negative. Try to compare this to the ugly mostrosity that was standing there before. HUGE improvement!

  • Chachi Charlottesville, VA
    Oct. 26, 2011 4:34 p.m.

    I agree that the skybridge could've been designed better. But I would not be so presumptious as to declare that it is unnecessary--not when Taubman Centers, which was extensive experience funding and developing shopping centers, determined that City Creek would not be viable without it.

    And it makes sense--who's going to stroll along the second level, then go downstairs, wait to cross the street, and then go upstairs again to pick up window shopping where they left off? Shoppers don't behave like that.

  • BR Sandy, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 4:44 p.m.

    CounterIntelligence

    Can you hold your unnecessary skybridge comments until the project is completed. At that time visit the area and make any necessary comment.

  • Well Read SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 5:00 p.m.

    It never seems to amaze me of the hatred that exists in this town. If any other entity other then The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints were building this shopping center those who express hatred would be praising this outstanding shopping and living environment that is being created. But I guess we can expect nothing better from such persons.

  • Bebyebe UUU, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 5:25 p.m.

    Won't spend one dime there.

  • Canuk SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 5:40 p.m.

    Congrats to the architects and the LDS Church for beautifying the city!
    I can't wait to see it all.
    I love the sky bridge and will be so happy in the cold and wet weather to be able to go from one mall to the other.
    I do think they should put a big tongue on the bottom and a squirrel, or a rock!

  • A voice of Reason Salt Lake City, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 5:43 p.m.

    What!? I LOVE the skybridge!

    I love the design. I thought it was perfectly designed to blend in with the city, the mall, etc. And from these picture it seems that it will have an amazing view as well. Of course some people thought the space needle looked bad too, but guess what... it's now a staple of Seattle. This bridge may not be that same staple item- but I like it and I know plenty of others that do to!

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 6:35 p.m.

    I know this makes me a 'hater' but the whole development to me seems kind of false. Sure, the buildings are real, and I'll go there when it's open from time to time, but the whole concept is a bit forced to me. We didn't need the retail space. It doesn't have to make money like another shopping mall would. I imagine the expectation that it will is there, but if it doesn't nobody has to explain to the bank or shareholders. And the timing is not good. Of course, if you're going to build this sort of thing, where better than the middle of a town where most people have to have some tiny inkling they're a shareholder in it, even if unwillingly? It's a monument to what money can do. I think only time will tell if it was what money should do.

  • mightymite DRAPER, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 7:50 p.m.

    What a wasted effort of money and resources. This will surely be labeled as the biggest business flop in slc and mormondom.

  • A1994 Centerville, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 7:52 p.m.

    @Hutterite

    "It's a monument to what money can do. I think only time will tell if it was what money should do."

    As a life-long resident of Utah and a frequent visitor to SLC, I can't imagine how this development is a bad thing. The former establishment was a ghost town because it was outmoded and inconvenient. So instead of letting an enormous mall sit vacant for years to come, the church decided to be proactive. If they didn't do anything about it, they would have been criticized for being bad neighbors.

    It seems like a lot of people are over-thinking this whole issue. They took a big dying ugly and turned it into a thing of beauty. End of story.

  • 007 Layton, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 7:52 p.m.

    At least it has a retractable roof. I never understood the concept of an outdoor shopping mall in Utah.

  • Chachi Charlottesville, VA
    Oct. 26, 2011 8:14 p.m.

    Although I disagree with "Counter Intelligence" about the skybridge being unnecessary, in no way was his/her comment hateful. Let's not get too defensive.

    I happen to agree that the skybridge's design isn't the greatest. Visually, it's too heavy, and makes the space underneath feel crowded. The etched leaves didn't turn out so well; unless you're very close they look like smudges. City Creek tried to pay homage to more traditional architectural styles; the skybridge could've reflected that.

    But hey, anytime you have a project this big, there will be some elements that could've been done better. There's far more to like about City Creek than to dislike. It's a bold attempt to introduce a mixed-use, transit-oriented, New Urbanist development into downtown Salt Lake, and even though Counter Intelligence and I might look at certain points and wish they'd been done differently, I think we both hope it's a success.

  • Diamond Pistol SANDY, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 8:19 p.m.

    @Hutterite

    As a real estate developer, the project MUST make money or else retailers will leave and the project will fail. Tiffany & CO. is going to be located there along with Nordstrom and other big-name retailers. They do their own (extremely detailed) market analysis before making a decision to invest in any new location. Having done the market analysis myself, Salt Lake City is throbbing for a downtown life such as what City Creek is bringing to it. There is so much pent up demand for this project, the shops, the restaurants, the lifestyle - it's something other cities have had and that Salt Lake (downtown, not the periphery, like the Gateway) has been wanting/needing for a long time. No entity, business, church or whatever is going to blow $1.5B for fun. This will completely change downtown Salt Lake in a big way. And what's with the silly comment about "what money can do?" Your car is a monument as to what money can do, as well as you house, as well as your clothes. 2,000 jobs and a healthy tax base is another huge bonus of this project.

  • Ernest T. Bass Bountiful, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 8:31 p.m.

    So super neat. Money well spent, downtown SLC is way more important than any other need the world may have.

  • Radically Moderate SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Oct. 26, 2011 9:07 p.m.

    Since I use the City Center trax station every day, I have to say that I actually like the bridge, even if only for two practical reasons. 1) It will keep shoppers from crowding the sidewalk to the station, only to keep walking, and 2) the little trax huts on the stations don't provide much protection against rain and snow, and this thing might do a better job on at least one station.

  • Rifleman Salt Lake City, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 6:03 a.m.

    Ex-Mayor Ross "Rocky" Anderson fought the Sky Bridge and Main Street Plaza tooth and nail. He lost and the businesses and people in Salt Lake City won. I wonder if he'll ever admit that he was wrong.

  • Ray in St.Petersburg Saint Petersburg, FL
    Oct. 27, 2011 6:25 a.m.

    I am appalled at the bitter, cynical, and overall tasteless comments made by some of your readers .....

  • one vote Salt Lake City, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 8:09 a.m.

    IT is a great project. It is subsidized by charitable exemption. Do the homeless get to camp out there?

  • Triple B Milford, NH
    Oct. 27, 2011 9:21 a.m.

    @ one vote.

    No, they get to come to your house. Glad you only get 1 vote.

  • ClarkKent Bountiful, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 10:00 a.m.

    Its definitely in keeping up with outward appearances as in common in Utah.

  • Rifleman Salt Lake City, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 10:06 a.m.

    Re: one vote | 8:09 a.m. Oct. 27, 2011
    "It is subsidized by charitable exemption."

    No, this project was financed by the commercial arm of the LDS Church, and not one single penny of charitable (tithing) funds was used. That means the funds used ARE NOT a charitable exemption.

  • city planner BOUNTIFUL, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 10:44 a.m.

    As I was going to the University of Utah to be a urban planner, I worked in the ugliest building that was left standing with the City Creek project. The building was then called the Beneficial Life tower. During the 90's the two malls (ZCMI and Crossroads) was becoming delapidated and outdated and there was no residential presence other than the Belvedere Apts. on State Street. By planning theory, downtown SLC was dying. The LDS Church realized this and wanted to ensure that their properties would not die by association with neighboring blocks of downtown (of which they had partial ownership).

    By creating nearly 600 residential units and more desirable options for dining and shopping in downtown SLC it will revitalize the area. Thanks should also be given to the Harmon Bros. They saw the vision in needing a full operating grocery store for the existing and new residences to use within walking distance.

    Rather than downtown SLC becoming a ghost town after 5:00 PM on a weekday or a weekend, downtown SLC will have a vibrant nightlife and a stronger economic value. Everything is cyclical and the redevelopment of downtown will be for the better.

  • Kirk R Graves West Jordan, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 11:11 a.m.

    Ray in St.Petersburg | 6:25 a.m. Oct. 27, 2011
    It is an ongoing problem. There is a small group that feels that because the DesNews has a strong LDS readership they need to add a little acid to the discussion.

  • Kirk R Graves West Jordan, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 11:12 a.m.

    I can't understand how anyone would have a negative thing to say about City Creek. Privately funded, Beautifully designed, revitalizes downtown, 2000 new jobs, adds tourism $ to SLC. Any negative comments are clearly showing an unfounded bias against,... well, we all know who it's against.

  • Kami Bountiful, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 11:27 a.m.

    My thoughts, from an active LDS point of view. I've been LDS my entire life, but only in Utah the last few years. I see a HUGE dependence upon the church by Utah mormons in general, more than I have experienced in any other community I have lived in throughout the U.S. Yet the church allegedly tries to teach independence. I see Utah mormons looking more than they should to the church to solve their problems. In communities outside of Utah, members of the church would be meeting with other members within their communities to solve the problems of their communties, to find funding to revitalize their downtown areas, etc. Yet in Utah, particularly the closer you get to Church headquarters, you see this happen again and again -- the church stepping in to solve the problems of the communities. I don't think this co-dependence is healthy. I also think that the funds spent on this project are an attempt to have the world believe that SLC's economy is healthier than it is.

  • Dutchman Murray, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 12:53 p.m.

    Not one dime of tax payer or LDS Church tithing money has been spent on City Creek. No City in the U.S. has had a commercial project of this size built without some kind of tax payer subsidy.

    Some comments here sound like those of the Occupy Wall Street protesters. You should be happy that no bail out money or tax payer money was used. Kudos to the LDS Church for such a wonderful and forward looking project.

  • Diamond Pistol SANDY, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 2:35 p.m.

    @Kami

    I somethat agree with some of your weird comments about co-dependence and the church - maybe your family or immediate circle is needy and you decided they represent a majority of Utah Mormons. What co-dependant community problem is the church trying to solve with the City Creek project are you referring to? And where on earth do you get the illusion that the church or community is in denial about our so-called suffering economy. It isn't what is was in 2006, but it's recovering and not in shambles like other markets - this project is creating 2,000 jobs! It's called creating/building economy in a city that is demanding this project. We've got the blind leading the blind - between people not understanding the facts and making ignorant comments, and the tent city in Pioneer Park of people waiting for handouts like the Wallstreet protesters.

  • LivinLarge Bountiful, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 2:47 p.m.

    First, with the LDS Church owning the property, I assume the CC&R's will not allow businesses to be open on the sabbath. This being the case, I commend the many business owners for their willingness to forfeit the ill gotten gains that would otherwise be earned on the sabbath day. Thanks in advance LDS Church for holding to your sacred standards.

  • Kami Bountiful, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 3:19 p.m.

    sDiamond Pistol | 2:35 p.m. Oct. 27, 2011

    I somethat agree with some of your weird comments about co-dependence and the church - maybe your family or immediate circle is needy and you decided they represent a majority of Utah Mormons. What co-dependant community problem is the church trying to solve with the City Creek project are you referring to? And where on earth do you get the illusion that the church or community is in denial about our so-called suffering economy. It isn't what is was in 2006, but it's recovering and not in shambles like other markets - this project is creating 2,000 jobs! It's called creating/building economy in a city that is demanding this project.

    @ Diamond Pistol, No my family doesn't need or take from the church. We have learned how to take care of ourselves. Communities and people living in communities need to learn to stand on their own two feet and figure out how to recover. Taking all of these funds from the deepest pocket in Utah is nothing less than a free handout. And it is expected in this State among MANY members of the church in Utah.

  • Kami Bountiful, Utah
    Oct. 27, 2011 3:34 p.m.

    LivinLarge | 2:47 p.m. Oct. 27, 2011
    Bountiful, UT
    First, with the LDS Church owning the property, I assume the CC&R's will not allow businesses to be open on the sabbath. This being the case, I commend the many business owners for their willingness to forfeit the ill gotten gains that would otherwise be earned on the sabbath day. Thanks in advance LDS Church for holding to your sacred standards.

    @LivinLarge, if you do a search you will find that the restaurants will be given the option to open on Sunday.

  • Dutchman Murray, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 3:42 p.m.

    The mayor of Philadelphia just assisted in breaking ground for a new LDS Temple in downtown Philadelphia in a high profile but run down area. The mayor and City Council members were thrilled to get a new Mormon Temple downtown and it is not even a commercial development. Salt Lake City is very lucky to have this commercial project built under the supervision of the LDS church. It has employed 1,500 construction workers and will provide 2,000 permanent jobs. What more can people ask for?

  • Dutchman Murray, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 4:28 p.m.

    Kami,

    They can open on Sunday and/or get a liquor license only if they own the property for their foot print. Which means they will have to purchase that foot print from the LDS Church which will be accomodating most of the time.

  • Truthseeker SLO, CA
    Oct. 27, 2011 6:26 p.m.

    Re:Rifleman
    Maybe you are right, maybe not.
    #1 Money is fungible.
    #2 How do you know where the money comes from? Church financial statements aren't public.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Oct. 27, 2011 6:31 p.m.

    The project is not subsidized by "charitable exemption". The Church pays taxes on all its for-profit properties. In fact it pays taxes on its investment properties it probably could get tax exempt status on but choses not to. The claim that there is any tax-exemption fueling this project in any way is false.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Oct. 27, 2011 6:36 p.m.

    Dutchman,
    I think you need to do more research. You are the fist person who I have ever seen call central Philadephia "run down". It is not run down, you are just wrong.

  • Flying Finn Murray, UT
    Oct. 27, 2011 8:37 p.m.

    Re: Truthseeker | 6:26 p.m. Oct. 27, 2011
    "How do you know where the money comes from?"

    The headquarters for the financial and charitable arms of the LDS along with their auditing departments are housed in different facilities. While their financial statements aren't public you can bet your life they are available to the IRS, and you can bet your last dollar the LDS Church wouldn't risk losing their tax exempt status by mingling charitable and non-charitable funds.

    Like I said earlier, not one single red cent of tithing or other charitable funds went into this financial enterprise.

  • nick humphrey kent, WA
    Oct. 28, 2011 12:54 a.m.

    "estimated $1.5 billion downtown development"

    estimated when? before they started building? what is the "actual" development cost?

  • Dutchman Murray, UT
    Oct. 28, 2011 8:50 a.m.

    John Pack Lambert of Michigan,

    The Mormon Temple in Philadelphia is being built at 17th and Vine Street. It is currently a vacant parking lot and the City has been trying to get a development on that site since the early 90's without success. The City even threatened to take the property away from an unsuccessful developer. Then the Church bought it instead. I think you can safely classify the area as run down.

  • River Dog Salt Lake City, UT
    Oct. 28, 2011 12:01 p.m.

    Downtown was dying a slow death. This project will bring new life to a real downtown area. It's beautiful and vibrant. Kudos to all involved.

  • OC Misfit Mission Viejo, CA
    Oct. 28, 2011 12:18 p.m.

    $1.5 Billion? I am an estimator in a large contruction company located in Southern California. Hi-rise, hi-end retail space can be built out for around $260/SF here. Maybe less now, since construction costs have gone down since the last time we priced one in 2008. Retail space can be built for around $125, complete, w/ interiors. 700,000 sf x $125 = $88 million. 731,000 sf condo space x $260/sf = $190 million. I don't know what the parking SF is, but that could go for up to $100/sf if its located underground. Lets say its equal to the bldg SF-1,431,000 sf at $100/sf = $143 million.
    88M plus 190M plus 143M = $421 million.
    I haven't broke half a billion dollars yet. How does Taubman spend $1.5 Billion dollars on all this? I thought the church already owned the land, and demo costs for what was there shouldn't even break 5% of the building cost.