Quantcast
Utah

ATK lays off 100 employees

Comments

Return To Article
  • Rob Logan, UT
    Aug. 3, 2011 7:25 p.m.

    That is so hard for these families.

  • Emophiliac Vernal, UT
    Aug. 3, 2011 7:59 p.m.

    Having watched a few tests and a few launches, I hope the 5 segment motor gets a chance to be flown and ATK can keep building them. Deep space is waiting.

  • govt rocks Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 3, 2011 10:37 p.m.

    This is an example of how companies that rely on government contracts are impacted by federal budget cuts.

  • Kimball Woodruff Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 8:40 a.m.

    If you're relying on the Federal meal ticket, now's probably a good time to consider moving to the public sector.

  • Gr8Dane Tremonton, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 9:15 a.m.

    More of Obama's "hope and change" hitting utah and the NASA manned space program, which he killed. But take heart everyone. He's shifting NASA funds over into redundant global warming satellites, and virtual classrooms, all the while paying Russia $60 million per astronaut per trip aboard the Soyuz to take what few real astronauts we will have left to the space station.

    Doesn't anyone else see the irony of our tax dollars subsidizing Russian Space Rocket builders while, at the same time, putting U.S. rocket builders out of work?

    It's Obamanomics at its worst. If this is hope and change, just shoot me now.

  • CHS 85 Sandy, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 11:00 a.m.

    @Gr8Dane

    Cyles of layoffs have always been a part of life at Thiokol (ATK). My dad worked there when he graduated from college and was laid off and re-hired several times before getting a job for another company and moving to SLC from Brigham City. Projects come and go, and people who work in industries that are constantly changing need to accept that, or work in another industry.

    Projects that rely on federal funding aren't guaranteed to be there forever. The previous president put began phasing us out of the Space Shuttle program, which has been successful for 30 years.

    In all honesty, though, how much does it cost the space shuttle to fly each astronaut on a mission - taking into consideration all the contractors, NASA employees, parts, fuel etc? I'm venturing a guess it is over $60 million per astronaut. According to NASA it is $450 million per mission, not including the initial investment of $1.7 billion for each shuttle.

  • DeltaFoxtrot West Valley, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 12:48 p.m.

    Just a sign of the times. In the 60's people gave their lives to make sure we beat the Russians to the moon, now we're paying them to put our men and women into orbit.

    What would JFK say about that?

  • Pagan Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 1:57 p.m.

    "According to the Pew Economic Policy Group, an extension of all of the Bush tax cuts will cost $3.1 trillion over ten years, once the costs of servicing the debt are factored in."

    Where are the jobs?

  • CHS 85 Sandy, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 2:28 p.m.

    @DeltaFoxtrot

    "Just a sign of the times. In the 60's people gave their lives to make sure we beat the Russians to the moon, now we're paying them to put our men and women into orbit."

    For what purpose? If our mission is to carry food to the space station and bring back the trash for $450 million per mission, I'm not sure we are getting the best bang for our buck.

  • DeltaFoxtrot West Valley, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 3:25 p.m.

    @CHS85: I never said the Space Shuttle program didn't need to go. Those things were literally falling apart while in orbit. However that doesn't mean we couldn't have created a more economical space travel system... modeled off what the Russians have.

    Oh, we tried that... but the program got canned, TWICE by Presidents who could care less about science and technology.

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 4, 2011 3:40 p.m.

    All while barack outsources these jobs to Russia. He's a disgrace

  • Farmintown Salt Lake City, Utah
    Aug. 4, 2011 8:35 p.m.

    "The amount the U.S. military spends annually on air conditioning in Iraq and Afghanistan: $20.2 billion, according to a former Pentagon official." "The proposed budget for FY 2010 would raise it to about $18.7 billion." So we spend more on air-conditioning tents than NASA annually? Observing historical surges in technical progress it looks like the winners are war and the space race. Personally I vote for the space race. I would rather invest money in teaching society how to fish (the NASA investment), than give him a fish (entitlement programs).