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International Business: In global airline marketing, idioms must be handled carefully

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  • mrubin78 Jeffersonville, 47130
    Dec. 30, 2010 1:35 p.m.

    I must mention the strangest gaffe I heard over the news years ago that some firms in Japan had some translation blunders using English connotation. One classic example of the blunder would be a packaging product, fresh breath spray, labeled "Wet Lips."

  • Janna Goodman Yuba City, CA
    Dec. 31, 2010 1:41 p.m.

    Years ago I heard about a restaurant in Japan that had a sign claiming that all the water they served had been "passed by the chef". The image that brings to the minds of English-speakers is probably not what was intended. All this makes me wonder what some of the foreign phrases we see written REALLY mean!

  • Phred Ogden, UT
    Jan. 1, 2011 2:24 a.m.

    Chevrolet cars were selling very well in Brazil, except for the Nova. Portuguese translation for No Va is "no go".

    The Coca Cola company tried to market their products using a phontic equivalent. Unfortunately it came out meaning "bite the wax turtle".