Quantcast
Faith

'I get to be different,' says Utah Muslim soccer player dedicated to her religion

Comments

Return To Article
  • Munk Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 2:11 a.m.

    This young lady is to be applauded. Her attitude is magnificent and this to me is an example of how things should be. We are all strong united, regardless of our faiths. Excellent article.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 6:27 a.m.

    France is right, such dress ought to be discouraged.

    The problem is that many women are forced to wear this garb. There have been several honor killings on teen girls that didn't want to live the Moslem religion. This seemingly happy girl doesn't realize the damage she is doing to future girls that don't want to be different but just want to be like everyone else.

    If she wants to be different let her do charity. Let her excel in her studies and then help her class mates in their studies. Wearing these clothes only draws attention to herself.

  • Frankenberry Saint George, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 6:51 a.m.

    You go, girl!

  • Wyclif OREM, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 7:13 a.m.

    Good for her. She should love it here. I think her Mormon friends and team mates can understand her better than most.

  • freedomforthepeople Sandy, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 7:33 a.m.

    I hope we see the extreme clothing some Muslims wear change over time to a more appropriate reflection of the purpose of the clothing. Modesty is to be applauded and respected, but when you see the extreme covering of hair and head, and often times (though not in this case apparently) the entire face with the exception of the eyes, there is a sense of fanatacism that is, I believe, unhealthy for girls and women.

    The purpose of the clothing is modesty according to the Muslims I know, and can be achieved with much less than the full covering of head and face. The limitation of color has to do with humility which again, can be achieved without only black or white. There is a strange line that is crossed when it changes from a reflection of someone's belief in modesty and humility and becomes a verdict judging a particular girl's or woman's worthiness to exist based upon how severely she adheres to a dress code. I have personally seen this happen, right here in Utah, where women are disgraced and live in fear because of husbands who demand a bizarre standard.

  • Joan Watson TWIN FALLS, ID
    Sept. 20, 2011 7:42 a.m.

    The word 'modesty' seems to be little understood in the clothing that many young girls, and also women wear these days. One can well admire and applaud this young Moslem girl for her adherance to her standards and religion.

  • Irony Guy Bountiful, Utah
    Sept. 20, 2011 7:52 a.m.

    Leave her alone. She'd be considered immodest in Afghanistan and crazy in Beverly Hills. Everyone has their own standards. As long as she's comfortable, whose business is it but hers?

  • Cinefan MIAMI, FL
    Sept. 20, 2011 7:58 a.m.

    Readers may want to Google "Islam: What the West Needs to Know" and watch the video.

    It certainly is an eye-opener.

  • Montana Mormon Miles City, MT
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:03 a.m.

    As a practicing member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I "claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of [my] own conscience, and allow all men [all people] the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may." I respect this young lady's decision and commend her coach and teammates, who have been supportive of her decision to practice her religion as she sees fit. That is as it should be.

  • Ace Farmington, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:06 a.m.

    I could not disagree more with cjb, and I applaud this young woman living her religious convictions even when others who obviously don't understand the religion criticize and suggest that you are doing damage to the future of women. What a silly comment, cjb.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:14 a.m.

    "This seemingly happy girl doesn't realize the damage she is doing to future girls that don't want to be different but just want to be like everyone else.
    "

    Oh sure, criticize the very obviously moderate Muslim family that I'm sure finds the notion of honor killings to be abhorent. What kind of message does that send to future girls? 'Sorry but we're going to assume the worst of your family because you don't conform to what we want?'

    And do I really have to remind you that the majority religion in this state has articles of clothing that are required to be worn too?

  • John Loveland OGDEN, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:18 a.m.

    Good for Serene. And good for her teammates and the athletic association, too. Religious tolerance is an example of true patriotism.

  • Colorado Reader Littleton, CO
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:20 a.m.

    "Good for her. She should love it here. I think her Mormon friends and team mates can understand her better than most."

    Some of her Mormon friends could also take a lesson from her. I am SHOCKED at what some Mormon girls will wear and still think themselves modest. I guess the standards don't always apply to everyone. I am glad this girl stands firm. I really respect and admire that. You don't have to agree with the "extreme clothing" to admire the commitment and obedience to her beliefs.

  • Reader Sandy, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:34 a.m.

    Good for this young lady! I wish some of the girls I see at church with skirts a foot or more above their knees would learn from her example.

  • milhouse Atlanta, GA
    Sept. 20, 2011 8:44 a.m.

    I also applaud the Deseret News for upholding religious expression for people who are not Mormon.

  • Candide Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:09 a.m.

    Imposition of modesty standards is just another way that men use to dominate women. Islamic men are not required to cover themselves in the same way that women are. Why is that? Women are made to feel that there is something wrong with their bodies and themselves and that they need to hide themselves under layers of clothing. We should be promoting equality between the sexes and not celebrating discriminatory practices. "Modesty is a vastly overrated virtue"-Galbraith

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:09 a.m.

    cjb, are you LDS? If so, then you should probably understand and not criticize somebody else for wearing special religious clothing.

  • CoolCougar Mesa, AZ
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:21 a.m.

    Love this article! We should focus on and praise the dedication of our youth today!

  • Ms Molli Bountiful, Utah
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:22 a.m.

    Colorado Reader, I agree with your point.

  • Petunia Blossom LITTLE ROCK, AR
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:27 a.m.

    Living in the South, we have seen Christian Pentecostal youth - both young men and young women - wear clothing for modesty with their school basketball or volleyball uniforms. All people should be free to live their faith in our country without ridicule - whether Muslim or Christian.

  • Champs de blé Provo, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:30 a.m.

    Way to go, DN! I hardly ever choose to comment on articles, but I'll make an exception for this one because it just made my day. I love learning about people who stand up for what they believe in-- it makes me want to set an example as well. Love the majority of comments here, too (unusual, I know)!

  • MiP Iowa City, IA
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:35 a.m.

    This is great.

  • MapleDon Springville, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 9:43 a.m.

    cinefan, thanks for the tip. Very interesting film.

    It's interesting how Islam is the only religion that we are told over and over (by the elites and the media) is one of peace. The "peace" adjective is never applied to Judaism, Christianity, Sikhism, Buddhism, etc.

    However, evidence is clear that "peace" for Islam only comes through control and the elimination of opposition and freedom. No other religion is more violent and intolerant than Islam.

    Yet, we bend over backwards to "applaud" Muslims.

    Though some of you pat yourselves on your backs for handing out praise, I'm not impressed. Just the opposite. "Foolish" is actually the adjective I'm thinking of.

  • Give Me A Break Pullman, WA
    Sept. 20, 2011 10:13 a.m.

    Sure there could be those who force their women to wear such clothing, but there are also many women who choose to do so. I am always grateful to women who leave it all to the imagination. Such women help my imagination, and the imaginations of so many other men, to not wander where it has no business wandering. It is a delight.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 10:20 a.m.

    @MapleDon
    "The "peace" adjective is never applied to Judaism, Christianity, Sikhism, Buddhism, etc"

    If people thought those other ones were violent then I imagine you'd see the word peace there too. The word peace is necessary because there are people such as yourself and cinefan who want to believe that most Muslims are some sort of radicals.

    None of you know anything about this girl's family other than that they are devout and let their daughter play soccer and yet we're supposed to assume that they're some sort of radical extremists?

  • MapleDon Springville, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 11:14 a.m.

    @atl134, "The word peace is necessary because there are people such as yourself and cinefan who want to believe that most Muslims are some sort of radicals."

    I take it that you see no correlation between Islam and radicalism. Right?

    So what we've witnessed over the past 25+ years with the spread of Islam and--shame on me for bringing up this word--terrorism isn't radical? What is occurring in parts of the Muslim world today (Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen, etc.) must be peaceful? The storming of the Israeli embassy in Cairo last week was simply an expression of an idea?

    Thanks for the insight.

  • spring street SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 11:30 a.m.

    @ cjb: So because some women are "forced" to wear this "garb" and because some future girl may want to make a choice different from the one this girl has made, we should remove this girls choice and force her to wear clothing that conforms with your standards?

    Do you not see the fallacy of your position? Do you not see that us forcing her to deny her religious standards is no different than someone else forcing her to adhere to those standards?

    Either way, force is used and choice is taken away. It is just as wrong one way as it is the other.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 11:45 a.m.

    @mapledon

    Terrorism is radical, and I claimed that the idea of most Muslims being extremist was false, not that there aren't any extremists. There are something like 1-1.5 billion muslims in the world and over a million in the U.S. If radical Islam was so prevalent then one would think we'd see much more terrorism. It'd really be helpful if everyone just visited a mosque once.

    "What is occurring in parts of the Muslim world today (Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen, etc.) must be peaceful?"

    Last I checked those four nations had/have dictators and the fighting there was started by those dictators themselves, though in the case of the latter two the opposition really hasn't fought back yet. What are you going to do next, criticize the American revolutionaries who fought against England for independence?

  • ke7ejx REDMOND, OR
    Sept. 20, 2011 11:49 a.m.

    I'm the only Mormon in my family and among my group of friends. It's really tough to stick to your faith and practices. Especially because you know people are watching you. I love how this young lady is able to practice her beliefs with such devotion and with a cheerful attitude. It's absolutely wonderful and it inspires me to be a better Latter-Day Saint. Well done!

  • custer Boise, ID
    Sept. 20, 2011 12:13 p.m.

    Muslin women/girls wearing head scarfs is a cultural decision. Covering of the hair for all women is not commanded in the Koran. Millions of devout Muslim women go about their lives with out any hair covering.

    Also--what does a women covering her hair, have to do with modesty?

    And--why don't Muslim males have the same standard? Why only women? This girl is running around all covered-up, while her male Muslim soccer friends wear no such attire. Looks like a double standard to me.

  • Kalindra Salt Lake City, Utah
    Sept. 20, 2011 12:50 p.m.

    @ custer: Kind of like the double standard of women having to wear shirts while men are allowed to go topless, huh?

  • Ms Molli Bountiful, Utah
    Sept. 20, 2011 2:39 p.m.

    Give Me A Break | 10:13 a.m. Sept. 20, 2011
    Pullman, WA
    "...I am always grateful to women who leave it all to the imagination. Such women help my imagination, and the imaginations of so many other men, to not wander where it has no business wandering. It is a delight"

    Give Me, this is not a gender issue. Women also have imaginations. Yet many men are very immodest in their dress. Heck my young adult male neighbor across the street, who is also mormon, does all of his yardwork shirtless with his jeans looking like they are about to fall off. I see MANY males in the church wearing pants on Sunday that look like they are about to fall off as well.

  • DeltaFoxtrot West Valley, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 2:40 p.m.

    I've got to agree with the French (and the Australians), this kind of dress only continues to advance the stereotype of women as second class citizens. It has no business in the "free" nations of the world and ought to be prohibited.

    It has to do with religion and culture all right, religion and culture focused on keeping women subservient.

  • Mukkake Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 3:43 p.m.

    There is nothing "admirable" about this. A "modest choice" here is a violently enforced oppression in many countries.

    The girl should feel lucky that she can choose to uncover her face and hands, much less engage in team sports. She wouldn't have that choice elsewhere.

  • MrsH Altamont, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 3:56 p.m.

    I admire this young lady for sticking to her beliefs. It cannot be easy. And then a lot of the commenters on here are ganging up on her and her family for what they believe!
    We do not know her family, but because they are different from us they must be bad. Yet some commenters on here will be the first to cry foul when the Mormons are criticized, because "that's not what we believe!"

    I just wish a lot of our LDS Youth (and some of the grownups!) had this young lady's conviction to her standards.

  • Cinefan MIAMI, FL
    Sept. 20, 2011 4:13 p.m.

    Islam is not a religion, per se. It is a governing doctrine that dictates religious beliefs along with social behavior, including laws, penalties and punishments, not by God, but by men if the laws are not obeyed. Islam is a form of government, not a religion. The United States already has government under its Constitution.

    If Muslims want to live and work in America and worship their prophet and God, that is not a problem. But when they try to go beyond their own personal worship and demand that we change our society and our faith to accommodate them, then that is where we need to draw the line. It is not we who should change, it is they.

    Muslim worship is protected under the First Amendment, Islamic law is not. Until Muslims, and our own government, can accept that, then Islam cannot be considered a religion and Islamic culture does not belong in the United States of America.

    from JR Dieckmann

  • milojthatch Sandy, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 5:02 p.m.

    I fully support this young lady for standing up for what she believes in. Latter-day Saints should understand better then most how hard that is in modern times, and not challenge her and make life more difficult for her. I hope she keeps this up, way to go!

  • cavetroll SANDY, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 5:46 p.m.

    CJB, this girl isn't doing any damage to future children by dressing like this. She chooses to dress the way she does, she would only be doing damage to other children if she forced them to dress a certain way. If she feels comfortable in the way she dresses, who cares? That is her choice.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 20, 2011 6:38 p.m.

    @Cinefan
    "Islam is not a religion, per se. It is a governing doctrine that dictates religious beliefs along with social behavior, including laws, penalties and punishments, not by God, but by men if the laws are not obeyed. Islam is a form of government, not a religion. The United States already has government under its Constitution."

    It's a religion. You can have a theocratic gov't that institutes Islam (as nations before have done with christianity, or even the utah pioneers for that matter with mormonism), but that doesn't change the fact that Islam is a religion. You want to classify it as something else so that you can justify your anti-muslim prejudices.

  • JohnJacobJingleHeimerSchmidt Beverly Hills, CA
    Sept. 21, 2011 1:41 a.m.

    As long as people have their agency they can practice their religion any way they please within the law.

    ANyone who think banning this expression is allowing government to take steps in banning practices of other religions. If you ban Muslim wear, they will ban garments next. Keep government out of religion and keep religion out of government.

    I applaud this young lady, especially living in Utah where I have heard many ugly comments from my fellow LDS about Muslims. Brothers and sisters, Jesus said love everyone, not just who you pick and choose.

  • Cinefan MIAMI, FL
    Sept. 21, 2011 5:32 a.m.

    @ atl134 | 6:38 p.m. Sept. 20, 2011

    Bury your head the sand. That is your prerogative.

    Please, watch the film "Islam: What the West Needs to Know". It's free on Google.

  • Cinefan MIAMI, FL
    Sept. 21, 2011 9:11 a.m.

    Reflecting on the retreat of Catholicism and the rise of Islam in France, Archbishop Giuseppe Bernardini, an Italian Franciscan who heads the Izmir archdiocese in Turkey, and who has lived in the Islamic world for more than 40 years, has recounted a conversation he once had with a Muslim leader, who told him: "Thanks to your democratic laws, we will invade you. Thanks to our religious laws, we will dominate you."

    Islam Overtaking Catholicism in France
    by Soeren Kern
    August 18, 2011

  • ksampow Farr West, Utah
    Sept. 21, 2011 10:55 a.m.

    Candide: Your claim is way off. Modesty is about morality, not domination. But there is one good point to your argument: modesty for males is becoming rare. Men need to be modest also. Society sometimes has a double standard. Men should not go around in public without a shirt. There are even public swimming pools that won't allow men to wear a t-shirt with their bathing suit.

  • Champs de blé Provo, UT
    Sept. 21, 2011 12:35 p.m.

    @Cinefan

    The French are a highly irreligious society that has attacked Christianity and Judaism as well as Islam. I wouldn't be using them as an example of how the US should act if you care about religious freedom in the world. I love the French, but this is one of the few things that I despise about their culture. They are a very nationalistic society that is not very open to things "un-french."

    You have the freedom to keep attacking Islam on this site, as do others. I will warn you, however, that by attacking one faith you are attacking religious freedom as a whole. You may find yourself at the butt of your own philosophy one day if the tide ever turns against your beliefs.

  • John Adams Miami, FL
    Sept. 21, 2011 3:48 p.m.

    @ Champs de blé | 12:35 p.m. Sept. 21, 2011

    I seriously doubt that Cinefan's faith or philosophy advocates in any, way, or form the total elimination of those who do not think and/or worship the way he might.

    Since you missed what the Muslim leader told the Atchbishop, let me repeat it for you: "Thanks to your democratic laws, we will invade you. Thanks to our religious laws, we will dominate you." Get the picture?

    It is painfully obvious from your reply that you have little understanding of Islam and its tenets. If they had their (and they are working on it), you and I and eeveryone else would either convert to Islam or die. If you think that religious freedom, then I urge you study the subject in greater depth.

  • Californian#1@94131 San Francisco, CA
    Sept. 21, 2011 5:05 p.m.

    * "I get to be different," Kergaye said. "I'm OK with that." *

    Not "I'm stuck with being different" or "I hafta do this." She's decided to live in the world but not of the world and she's happy with that.

    What a cool attitude. :)

  • UT Brit London, England
    Sept. 21, 2011 5:07 p.m.

    @John Adams

    Do you check in your closet and look under your bed for muslims at night?

    @cinefan

    Watch "Godmakers" for all you need to know about the LDS church.

  • John Adams Miami, FL
    Sept. 22, 2011 5:33 a.m.

    @ UT Brit | 5:07 p.m. Sept. 21, 2011

    You apparently support the Islamification of Britain and you compare Islam to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    Interesting...

  • John Adams Miami, FL
    Sept. 22, 2011 6:25 a.m.

    This will be my last comment on the subject. Allow me to quote Pat Condell from his YouTube video "No Mosque at Ground Zero".

    "Any religion that endorses violence is incapable of delivering Spiritual enlightenment. How obvious does that have to be? And it has no right to even call itself a religion. Without the shield of religion to hide behind, Islam would be banned in the civilized world as a political ideology of hate, and we have no obligation to make allowances for it any more than we do for Nazism. It's a bigger threat to our freedom than Nazism ever was. Yes, both are totalitarian and both divide the world unnecessarily into us and them, the pure and the impure, and both make no secret of their desire to exterminate the Jews.

    "But we were are all, more or less, on the same side against the Nazis, whereas the Islamo-Nazis have got plenty of friends among people in the West who ought to know better."

  • mom of three Holladay, UT
    Sept. 22, 2011 8:52 a.m.

    to UT BRIT. no, if you want to find out about the LDS faith, talk to the missionaries, LDS bishops, active members or read the book of mormon. you don't read anti-LDS literature or books by ex-members. they are full of false statements. check out the lds website for true statements about the church. i just love how people that are not members of our faith feel like they know more about what we practice than we do.

  • Champs de blé Provo, UT
    Sept. 22, 2011 9:31 a.m.

    @mom of three

    That was UT BRIT's whole point: You don't watch anti-videos, read anti-literature, or speak with uninformed people to understand a religion. You're absolutely right: you do speak with religious scholars, active members, read their actual scripture, and listen to discussions from their leaders. Any person who does this will see how good a religion Islam is, despite the actions of a few wackos claiming to be practicing the same religion.

    "i just love how people that are not members of our faith feel like they know more about what we practice than we do."

    Again you hit it dead on. That's exactly what people who are defending Islam are trying to say.

    John Adams and Cinefan (I'm almost certain you are the same person), I'm not going to beleaguer this argument with you any more. Any person with a decent amount of intelligence will be able to see your posts for what they really are. Have a nice day.

  • UT Brit London, England
    Sept. 22, 2011 11:40 a.m.

    @John Adams

    Well it looks like you have extremely bad reasoning and comprehension skills. I work with Muslims, I laugh with them, I have them round to my house for dinner and their kids play with my kids.
    You will find that Muslims are more concerned about supporting their families, keeping their jobs and providing for their future than world domination. You know, like everyone else.

    @mom of three

    *sigh* I am a member, read Champs de blé's explanation above.

  • MrsH Altamont, UT
    Sept. 29, 2011 11:56 a.m.

    UT Brit, I got the sarcasm too.

    May I say I enjoy your posts. You make a lot of sense.

  • DevDave SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Sept. 30, 2011 7:34 p.m.

    Wow. You all make me proud to be Mormon. Do you not realize that in her country she would be stoned if she went out looking like your daughters? Even modest under YOUR standards? Is that to be applauded? Educate yourselves, people. Educate yourselves.