Al Jazeera English via Flickr

Obesity can take its toll on a person's health, but it can do the same to Earth's resources. Here's a list of the 10 most overweight countries in the world in 2005, according to research from the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine. The report was compiled by a team of researchers led by Professor Ian Roberts, who used data from the United Nations and World Health Organization. The rankings are based on theoretical total energy expenditure and calculated from Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations for adults. The report can be found at BioMed Central.

10 Bahrain
Al Jazeera English via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.6

A key determinant of the body mass index is motor vehicle gas consumption per capita. That's why so many middle eastern countries made the list.

9 Greece
Janesdead via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.3

“Our results emphasize the importance of looking at biomass rather than just population numbers when considering the ecological impact of a species, especially humans," Sarah Walpole, a hospital doctor who worked with the research team, told the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

8 Argentina
Fortes via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.8

"Everyone accepts that population growth threatens global environmental sustainability - our study shows that population fatness is also a major threat," Roberts told the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

7 Trinidad and Tobago
Brennan Linsley, AP

Adults per ton: 13.8

One ton of human biomass is equal to about 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia.

6 United Arab Emirates
Groundreporter via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.2

Rising obesity rates might be increasingly critical to food security and ecological sustainability.

5 Egypt
Shoveling_ferret via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.5

With the prevalence of obesity on the rise, the study concludes that if it goes unchecked, it could have the same effects on the world's energy as an additional 473 million people.

4 Qatar
KIN CHEUNG, AP

Adults per ton: 13.0

Even though Asia had 61 percent of the world's population, the continent had only 13 percent of the world's biomass due to obesity.

3 Croatia
Michael_Spencer via Flickr

Adults per ton: 13.1

If every country had the same average body mass index (a measure of body fat based on individual weight and height) as the U.S., the total human biomass would rise by 58 million tons.

That equates to the average body mass of another 935 million people.

2 Kuwait
DVIDSHUB via Flickr

Adults per ton: 12.9

People's size and weight determine how much energy the human race needs, according to researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, led by Professor Ian Roberts.

1 The United States
Bikoy via Flickr

Adults per ton: 12.2

Continental North America had just 6 percent of the world's population, yet it had 34 percent of the world's human biomass due to obesity.