On April 15, 1912, the RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and sank on her maiden voyage, leaving just over 700 survivors out of the more than 2,000 people on board. Now, 100 years after the sinking of the Titanic, museum artifacts and pictures of the wreck help offer glimpses of life in 1912, and life aboard the Titanic. Related stories: Prayers and silence mark Titanic centenary The enduring Titanic: Life lessons gained from the tragedy Titanic: the unsinkable cultural phenomenon Free Lunch: Legacy of Titanic's only Utahn will be passed down for generations

The ill-fated voyage begins

In this April 10, 1912, file photo, the oceanliner Titanic leaves Southampton, England on her maiden voyage. April 15, 2012 was the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, just five days after it left for New York.

Titanic's bow on the ocean floor

This April 2, 2010 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc., shows the bow of the RMS Titanic on the ocean floor during an expeditions to the site of the tragedy.

'Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition'

John Zaller, creative director of Premier Exhibitions, discusses objects from the Titanic's Verandah Cafe on display in the "Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition" at the Discovery Times Square Exposition in New York, in this June 24, 2009 file photo.

A deck chair on display

Visitors view a display on the exploration of the Titanic wreck at the Titanic Museum in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. on Tuesday April 3, 2012.

Propellers during construction

This May 31, 1911 photo made available by the Library of Congress, shows the hull of the S.S. Titanic under construction in dry dock. April 15, 2012 was the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, just five days after it left Southampton on its maiden voyage to New York.

Propeller on the ocean floor

This September 12, 2008 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc., shows one of the propellers of the RMS Titanic on the ocean floor during an expedition to the site of the tragedy.

Crow's nest bell

Tom Zaller, an exhibition manager, adjusts the bell from the crow's nest of the Titanic which is on display during a preview of a new exhibition at the Science Museum in London, Thursday May 15, 2003. The bell was rung by seaman Fredrick Fleet to warn the ship that an iceberg was ahead on its ill-fated maiden voyage.

Grand Staircase re-creation

Shown is a re-creation of the Grand Staircase's first and second landing at the Titanic, The Artifact Exhibition at the Metreon in San Francisco Tuesday, June 13, 2006. The staircase was the social hub of First Class life aboard Titanic and was recreated for the exhibit. The gallery also features the original bronze-cast base on which the Cherub stood.

Staircase cherub

This October 19, 2011 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc. shows a cherub that once adorned the grand staircase of the RMS Titanic which was recovered from the ocean floor during an expedition to the site of the tragedy, on display.

Skylight frame found

This photo released by the Institute for Exploration/University of Rhode Island shows the skylight frame from either the grand staircase or the aft staircase of the luxury liner Titanic, resting on the sea floor near the stern debris field of the Titanic on June 6, 2004.

Bridge Officer William Murdoch's belongings

A photo of William Murdoch, the bridge officer aboard the Titanic, looks over his personal effects on display before an exhibition opens to the public Tuesday, April 3, 2012, in Atlanta. From the pitch-black depths 2½ miles beneath the North Atlantic, salvagers of the Titanic made a notable discovery when they located the personal effects of Murdoch, the bridge officer who tried in vain to keep the doomed ship from colliding with an iceberg. The artifacts, including a shoe brush, straight razor and pipe, are the first to be specifically tied to Murdoch.

View of the wreckage

The port side forward expansion joint on the boat deck, in the vicinity of the officer's lavatory of the bow section of the shipwreck Titanic, is shown in this high definition video image courtesy of National Geographic, taken June 1, 2004 by ROC Hercules.

Plaques honor those lost on Titanic

Plaques left behind by visiting expeditions, seen in this July 2003 photo, are positioned near the telemotor on the deck of the Titanic more than two miles underwater in the north Atlantic.

Porthole on display

Tom Zaller, Vice-President of "RMS Titanic Inc.", shows a porthole that was saved from the wreckage of the luxury liner Titanic.

Recovered sheet music, $5 bill

A piece of sheet music for the piece "Put Your Arms Around Me Honey", that was played by the doomed musicians aboard R.M.S. Titanic, after it was placed in the traveling Titanic exhibit Thursday, March 23, 2006. The piece of sheet music and a $5 bill issued in St. Louis in 1903 were both recovered from the bottom of the Atlantic.

Madeline Astor's life vest

This is the actual life vest worn by Madeline Astor, wife of John Jacob Astor IV, is seen on display at the Titanic Museum in Springfield, Mass., April 3, 2001. Astor, who was 18 at the time, is shown with her husband, 48 at the time, in the photograph at right. She survived the sinking of the Titanic on April 12, 1912, aboard one of the lifeboats.

Various artifacts from the Titanic

Various artifacts from the Titanic are on display at the Titanic Museum in the Indian Orchard of Springfield, Mass., shown on Tuesday, April 3, 2001. In the foreground is an actual metal White Star line flag that was bolted on the the side of a Titanic lifeboat which some were saved in.

Perfume recovered from the wreck

Vials of perfume oil recovered from the wreck of the Titanic on display at the Science Museum in London, Thursday May 15, 2003.

A band member's clarinet

This wooden clarinet salvaged from the wrecakge of the Titanic is among some of the artifacts displayed by RMS Titanic, Inc.

Thanking the Carpathia crew

In this photo released by Christies Auction House in New York, three artifacts from a crew member o f the R.M.S. Carpathia, a ship that was instrumental in rescuing survivors of the R.M.S. Titanic after it hit an iceberg and sank in 1912, are shown. In the upper left is a bronze medallion commissioned by Titanic survivor, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and given to crew members for the Carpathia in gratitude for their part in the rescue.

Trying to save the mail

This pocket watch was recovered from the body of American postal clerk John Starr March, one of five mail clerks who died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic. March and four colleagues gave their lives trying to save heavy bags of mail on the doomed RMS Titanic; the "RMS" stood for Royal Mail Steamer.

Belongings of postal clerks tell stories

This pocket watch with a mail key and chain was recovered from the body of American postal clerk Oscar Scott Woody, one of five mail clerks who died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic. Woody and four colleagues gave their lives trying to save heavy bags of mail on the doomed RMS Titanic; the "RMS" stood for Royal Mail Steamer.

Order among the chaos

Dozens of au gratin dishes are exhibited as they were found during one of RMS Titanic Inc.'s expeditions to the Titanic debris field at Titanic. The dishes were still crated aboard Titanic, but once on the ocean floor, the wooden crate was eaten away by micro-organisms, leaving the dishes in near-perfect condition and well-organized rows.

17-ton section recovered from Titanic

This July 22, 2009 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc. shows the 17-ton section of the RMS Titanic that was recovered from the ocean floor during an expeditions to the site of the tragedy.

First Class cabin portholes

These portholes on "The Big Piece" looked into First Class cabins on Titanic's C-Deck. Some of the portholes still hold original glass, after more than 80 years on the ocean floor where there is more than 6,000 of pressure per inch.

Binoculars on display

Binoculars found among the debris of the Titanic wreck are previewed among a sampling of Titanic artifacts on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2012 in New York.

A third class passenger's pocket watch

A pocket watch found in the belongings of a third class passenger named William Henry Allen, found in the Titanic wreckage, is among a sampling of Titanic artifacts on preview Thursday, Jan. 5, 2012 in New York.

Currency salvaged from the wreck

Currency is shown as part of the artifacts collection at a warehouse in Atlanta, Friday, Aug 15, 2008. The 5,500-piece collection contains almost everything recovered from the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which has sat 2.5 miles below the surface of the Atlantic ocean since the boat sank on April 15, 1912.

Titanic's telegraph on the ocean floor

This September 1, 2009 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc., shows a ship's telegraph from the RMS Titanic on the ocean floor during an expeditions to the site of the tragedy.

Titanic telegraph on display

This October 19, 2011 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc. shows a ship's telegraph from the RMS Titanic which was recovered from the ocean floor during an expedition to the site of the tragedy.

Telegraph of the doomed ship

In the foreground at right is a telegraph that was used to communicate engineering information between the Bridge and the Engineering Department on the doomed ship Titanic. In the background visitors touch an actual iceberg, created in the shape sketched by the lookout in Titanic's crows nest.

Chandelier recovered from the wreckage

This October 19, 2011 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc. shows a chandelier from the RMS Titanic which was recovered from the ocean floor during an expedition to the site of the tragedy.

A hat from a Titanic passenger

This August 16, 2011 image provided by RMS Titanic, Inc. shows a hat from the RMS Titanic which was recovered from the ocean floor during an expedition to the site of the tragedy.

Logometer found among Titanic wreckage

A logometer, for displaying a ship's speed, was found in the Titanic wreckage.

First class tea cup china

A first class tea cup china used by passengers is a part of the artifacts collection of the Titanic.