Billy Crystal (AP)

What do George Clooney, gender identity crisis and silent film have in common? The 2012 Oscars. With a lineup like that, this could be the year the Academy Awards end their ratings skid and find a way back into the hearts of movie lovers everywhere. To help you get ready for the Oscars, Deseret News has put together this guide for everything from hosts and viewing times to who's up for best adaptation. Take it with you to this year's viewing soiree and you'll be the life of the party when you can name Michel Hazanavicius' birthplace or how many nominations Glenn Close has under her belt.

Who is hosting this year?
Billy Crystal (AP)

Billy Crystal returns for his ninth time as host of the 84th Academy Awards.

Who is scheduled to present?
Actress Angelina Jolie prepares for Oscar night (AP)

Tom Hanks, Angelina Jolie, Halle Berry, Tom Cruise, Jennifer Lopez, Cameron Diaz, Penelope Cruz, Emma Stone and the cast of “Bridesmaids” are among the presenters.

Who produced this year's Academy Awards?
Academy Awards producers Don Mischer (left), Brian Grazer (right) (AP)

After replacing Brett Ratner as the producer of last year's Academy Awards, X-Men director Brian Grazer was asked back for a second year in a row to work with his partner and co-producer from 2011, Don Mischer.

When are the Oscars on? SUNDAY MORNING
Good Morning America

That's not an easy question to answer. The actual awards show plays for almost four hours in the evening but ABC has a full day of coverage planned for those of you who love to party with Oscar all day long.

Good Morning America kicks things off early with ABC news correspondent Chris Connelly live from Hollywood.

Watch: ABC, Time: Check local listings

When are the Oscars on? SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Unveiling the Academy Awards (AP)

Rachel Smith and George Pennacchio will broadcast live from the red carpet while Cameron Mathison asks the stars fans Facebook and Twitter questions.

Tina Malave and Lawrence Zarian use the power of Trendrr to track what is red hot, right now.

Fashion expert Roshumba Williams joins Michelle Tuzee to critique the red carpet couture.

Watch: Some ABC Affiliates. Time: 1:30 p.m., PT /4:30 p.m., ET

When are the Oscars on? SUNDAY EVENING
Actress Michelle Williams at the 84th Academy Awards (AP)

Robin Roberts, Tim Gunn, Louise Roe, Jess Cagle and Nina Garcia walk and talk up the red carpet.

Watch: ABC, Time: 4:00 p.m., PT/7:00 p.m., ET

Billy Crystal returns for his ninth time as host of The 84th Academy Awards. The Oscars will be seen in 225 countries around the world.

Watch: ABC, Time: 4:30 p.m. PT/8:30 p.m. ET

When are the Oscars on? LATE NIGHT
Jimmy Kimmel (AP)

Once again Jimmy Kimmel Live will wrap things up on Oscar night which has proven to be Kimmel’s destination for debuting the show’s signature comedy pieces such as “Handsome Men’s Club,” and Tom Hanks’ “Toddlers and Tiaras.”

This year should be especially good as Meryl Streep, George Clooney, Tom Hanks, Martin Scorsese, Helen Mirren, Charlize Theron, Don Cheadle, John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Samuel L. Jackson, Cameron Diaz, Taylor Lautner, Nolan Gould, Gary Oldman, Antonio Banderas, Edward Norton, Tyler Perry, Colin Ferrell, John Goodman, Jeff Goldblum, Jessica Alba, J.J. Abrams, Jason Bateman, Christoph Waltz, Jessica Biel, Gabourey Sidibe, Josh Brolin, Kevin James, Oprah Winfrey, and many more will participate in Kimmel’s next installment.

Cold Play are scheduled to play and Billy Crystal will join Kimmel on the send off.

Watch: ABC, When: Immediately after the Oscars

Best Picture Nominee: THE ARTIST

In 1929, actor George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is a bona fide matinee idol with many adoring fans. While working on his latest film, George finds himself falling in love with an ingenue named Peppy Miller (Bernice Bejo) and, what's more, it seems Peppy feels the same way. But George is reluctant to cheat on his wife with the beautiful young actress. The growing popularity of sound in movies further separates the potential lovers, as George's career begins to fade while Peppy's star rises.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: November 23, 2011
Box office to date: $28,873,799
Director: Michel Hazanavicius
Cast: Penelope Ann Miller, John Goodman, James Cromwell, Bernice Bejo, Missi Pyle, Jean Dujardin

Family Media Guide Ratings: PG-13, 100% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: THE DESCENDANTS

Native islander Matt King (George Clooney) lives with his family in Hawaii. Their world shatters when a tragic accident leaves his wife in a coma. Not only must Matt struggle with the stipulation in his wife's will that she be allowed to die with dignity, but he also faces pressure from relatives to sell their family's enormous land trust. Angry and terrified at the same time, Matt tries to be a good father to his young daughters, as they too try to cope with their mother's possible death.

MPAA Rating: R
Release Date: November 16, 2011
Box office to date: $76,326,693
Director: Alexander Payne
Cast: Beau Bridges, George Clooney, Matthew Lillard, Robert Forster, Judy Greer, Shailene Woodley, Nick Krause, Amara Miller, Patricia Hastie

Family Media Guide Ratings: Low R, 25% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE

Oskar (Thomas Horn), who lost his father (Tom Hanks) in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center, is convinced that his dad left a final message for him somewhere in the city. Upon finding a mysterious key in his father's closet, Oskar sets out in search of the lock it fits. Feeling disconnected from his grieving mother (Sandra Bullock) and driven by a tirelessly active mind, Oskar has a journey of discovery that takes him beyond his loss and leads to a greater understanding of the world.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: December 25, 2011
Director: Stephen Daldry
Box office to date: $30,956,984
Cast: Max von Sydow, James Gandolfini, John Goodman, Sandra Bullock, Tom Hanks, Hazelle Goodman, Jeffrey Wright, Zoe Caldwell, Jim Norton, Viola Davis, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Thomas Horn, Dennis Hearn

Family Media Guide Ratings: High PG-13, 60% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: THE HELP

In 1960s Mississippi, Southern society girl Skeeter (Emma Stone) returns from college with dreams of being a writer. She turns her small town on its ear by choosing to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent white families. Only Aibileen (Viola Davis), the housekeeper of Skeeter's best friend, will talk at first. But as the pair continue the collaboration, more women decide to come forward, and as it turns out, they have quite a lot to say.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: August 10, 2011
Box office to date: $169,674,739
Director: Tate Taylor
Cast: Mary Steenburgen, Cicely Tyson, Sissy Spacek, Allison Janney, Aunjanue Ellis, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Mike Vogel, Chris Lowell, Bryce Howard, Jessica Chastain, Emma Stone, Ahna O'Reilly, Anna Camp

Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG, 88% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: HUGO

Orphaned and alone except for an uncle, Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) lives in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. Hugo's job is to oil and maintain the station's clocks, but to him, his more important task is to protect a broken automaton and notebook left to him by his late father (Jude Law) ]. Accompanied by the goddaughter (Chloe Grace Moretz) of an embittered toy merchant (Ben Kingsley), Hugo embarks on a quest to solve the mystery of the automaton and find a place he can call home.

MPAA Rating: PG
Release Date: November 23, 2011
Box office to date: $67,843,944
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cast: Ben Kingsley, Ray Winstone, Helen McCrory, Jude Law, Christopher Lee, Emily Mortimer, Richard Griffiths, Frances de la Tour, Sacha Baron Cohen, Chloe Moretz, Michael Stuhlbarg, Asa Butterfield

Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG, 93% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: MIDNIGHT IN PARIS

Gil Pender (Owen Wilson) is a screenwriter and aspiring novelist. Vacationing in Paris with his fiancee (Rachel McAdams), he has taken to touring the city alone. On one such late-night excursion, Gil encounters a group of strange -- yet familiar -- revelers, who sweep him along, apparently back in time, for a night with some of the Jazz Age's icons of art and literature. The more time Gil spends with these cultural heroes of the past, the more dissatisfied he becomes with the present.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: May 20, 2011
Box office to date: $56,560,957
Director: Woody Allen
Cast: Kathy Bates, Mimi Kennedy, Adrien Brody, Carla Bruni, Kurt Fuller, Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard, Michael Sheen, Alison Pill, Rachel McAdams, Tom Hiddleston, Corey Stoll, Léa Seydoux, Nina Arianda

Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG-13, 81% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: MONEYBALL

Billy Beane (Brad Pitt), general manager of the Oakland A's, one day has an epiphany: Baseball's conventional wisdom is all wrong. Faced with a tight budget, Beane must reinvent his team by outsmarting the richer ball clubs. Joining forces with Ivy League graduate Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), Beane prepares to challenge old-school traditions. He recruits bargain-bin players whom the scouts have labeled as flawed, but have game-winning potential. Based on the book by Michael Lewis.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: September 23, 2011
Box office to date: $75,605,492
Director: Bennett Miller
Cast: Brad Pitt, Arliss Howard, Nick Searcy, Robin Wright, Glenn Morshower, Philip Hoffman, Reed Diamond, Stephen Bishop, Jack McGee, Brent Jennings, Vyto Ruginis, Tammy Blanchard, Chris Pratt, Jonah Hill, Ken Medlock, Kerris Dorsey, Casey Bond, Nick Porrazzo

Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG-13, 92% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: THE TREE OF LIFE

In this highly philosophical film by acclaimed director Terrence Malick, young Jack (Hunter McCracken) is one of three brothers growing up as part of the O'Brien family in small-town Texas. Jack has a contentious relationship with his father (Brad Pitt), but gets along well with his beautiful mother (Jessica Chastain). As an adult, Jack (Sean Penn) struggles with his past and tries to make sense of his childhood, while also grappling with bigger existential issues.

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: May 27, 2011
Box office to date: $13,303,319
Director: Terrence Malick
Cast: Sean Penn, Brad Pitt, Fiona Shaw, Irene Bedard, Jessica Chastain, Jessica Fuselier, Hunter McCracken, Laramie Eppler, Tye Sheridan

Family Media Guide Ratings: High PG-13, 33% WYT

Best Picture Nominee: WAR HORSE

War Horse is a 2011 American war drama film directed by Steven Spielberg and is intended for release in the United States on 25 December 2011 and in the United Kingdom on 13 January 2012. It is based on both War Horse, a children's novel set during World War I, by British author Michael Morpurgo, first published in the United Kingdom in 1982, and the 2007 stage adaptation of the same name. The cast includes David Thewlis, Benedict Cumberbatch, Jeremy Irvine, Emily Watson, Tom Hiddleston and Peter Mullan. The film is produced by Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy, and executive produced by Frank Marshall and Revel Guest. Long term Spielberg collaborators Janusz Kamiski, Michael Kahn and John Williams have all worked on the film. In Devon at the outbreak of World War I, Joey, young Albert Narracott's beloved horse, is sold to the cavalry and shipped to France. He serves in the British and German armies, which takes him on an extraordinary odyssey, serving on both sides before being alone in No Man's Land. But Albert cannot forget Joey, and, still not old enough to enlist in the army, he embarks on a dangerous mission to find and bring Joey home. Michael Morpurgo wrote the 1982

MPAA Rating: PG-13
Release Date: December 25, 2011
Box office to date: $78,865,632
Director: Steven Spielberg
Cast: David Thewlis, Emily Watson, Niels Arestrup, Peter Mullan, Geoff Bell, Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston, Toby Kebbell, Patrick Kennedy, David Kross, Rainer Bock, Robert Emms, Jeremy Irvine, Celine Buckens, Leonard Carow, Matt Milne

Family Media Guide Ratings: High PG-13, 88% WYT

Who will win Best Picture?

In a year when one nominee that looks good on paper was clobbered by bad reviews (the Tom Hanks-Sandra Bullock-starring “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close”) and another was underappreciated for its classic style (“War Horse”), the competition here is mostly between the fizzy joys of “The Artist,” the multi layered drama of “The Descendants” and “The Help” and the lovely precision of “Hugo.” Expect “The Artist” to prevail, especially since Oscar voters can’t resist a movie that celebrates their own craft.

Who should win Best Picture?

“The Descendants,” another excellent snapshot of the human heart from director Alexander Payne. It conveys the magnificent, tragic messiness of life through the story of a husband and father coping with revelations in the wake of his wife’s devastating coma.

Best Actor Nominee: DEMIAN BICHIR

For: A Better Life
Born: Mexico City, Mexico
Age: 48
Notable Work: Che: Part Two (2008), Che: Part One (2008)
Oscar History: This is his first nomination

Best Actor Nominee: GEORGE CLOONEY

For: The Descendants
Age: 50
Born: Lexington, Kentucky
Notable work: The Ides of March (2011), Up In The Air (2009), Michael Clayton (2007), Syriana (2005), Oceans Eleven (2001)
Oscar History: 1 win (acting), 7 Nominations (4 for acting, 2 for writing, 1 for directing)

Best Actor Nominee: JEAN DUJARDIN

For: The Artist
Age: 39
Born: Rueil-Malmaison, France
Notable work: OSS 117: Lost in Rio (2009), OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies (2006)
Oscar History: This is his first nomination

Best Actor Nominee: GARY OLDMAN

For: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
Age: 53
Born: New Cross, London, England
Notable work: The Professional (1994), The Fifth Element (1997), Batman Begins (2005), Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)
Oscar History: Surprisingly, this is his first nomination

Best Actor Nominee: BRAD PITT

For: Moneyball
Age: 48
Born: Shawnee, Oklahoma
Notable work: Twelve Monkey (1995), Se7en (1995), Fight Club (1999), Oceans Eleven (2001), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)
Oscar History: This is his third nomination (all for acting)

Who will win Best Actor?
Associated Press

George Clooney has never been better. And goodness knows that Gary Oldman deserves to be recognized for decades of superb acting. But when a performer commands a movie with such throwaway grace, the Oscars tend to give him the gold. Jean Dujardin, prepare to be honored for displaying world-class style, delivering sweet dance moves and making silent films cool again.

Who should win Best Actor?
Associated Press

Clooney, who succeeded by scrapping his debonair confidence and digging deep to find the place where sorrow, jealousy and wisdom meet in an average man struggling to do his best in an impossible situation.

Best Actress Nominee: GLENN CLOSE

For: Albert Nobbs
Age: 64
Born: Greenwich, Connecticut
Notable work: The World According to Garp (1982), The Big Chill (1983), Fatal Attraction (1987), Dangerous Liason (1988), Air Force One (1997)
Oscar History: This is her sixth nomination (all for acting)

Best Actress Nominee: VIOLA DAVIS

For: The Help
Age: 51
Born: Saint Matthews, South Carolina
Notable work: Doubt (2008), Eat Pray Love (2010), Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011)
Oscar History: This is her second nomination (both for acting)

Best Actress Nominee: ROONEY MARA

For: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
Age: 26
Born: Bedford, New York
Notable work: The Social Network (2010)
Oscar History: This is her first nomination

Best Actress Nominee: MERYL STREEP

For: The Iron Lady
Age: 62
Born: Summit, New Jersey
Notable work: The Deer Hunter (1978), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), Sophie's Choice (1982), Out of Africa (1985), The Devil Wears Prada (2006), Julie & Julia (2009)
Oscar History: This is her seventeenth nomination (two wins, wins and nominations all for acting)

Best Actress Nominee: MICHELLE WILLIAMS

For: My Week With Marilyn
Age: 31
Born: Kalispell, Montana
Notable work: The Station Agent (2003), Brokeback Mountain (2005), Wendy & Lucy (2008)
Oscar History: This is her third nomination (all for acting)

Who will win Best Actress?

Although Meryl Streep is technically superb and emotionally on target as Margaret Thatcher, she is burdened with a movie that feels more like a series of quick pencil sketches than a finished portrait. Viola Davis, on the other hand, takes viewers on a journey into the soul of her character, showing us both the guarded outward composure of an African-American maid in the 1960s South and the strength, anger, tenderness and complexity that define her inner life. For such an epic turn, Davis is bound to take home the statuette.

Who should win Best Actress?
Viola Davis at the SAG Awards in January (AP)

Davis, a phenomenal actress who finally is getting a chance to show what she can do with a starring role. She conveyed the struggles of a woman in a specific time and place in history, yet made her character’s voice speak for the timeless, universal search for equality and acknowledgment.

Best Supporting Actress Nominee: BERENICE BEJO

For: The Artist
Age: 35
Born: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Notable work: A Knight's Tale (2001), OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies (2006)
Oscar History: This is her first nomination

Best Supporting Actress Nominee: JESSICA CHASTAIN

For: The Help
Age: 30
Born: Bay Area, California
Notable work: The Tree of Life (2011), Take Shelter (2011), Coriolanus (2011)
Oscar History: This is her first nomination

Best Supporting Actress Nominee: MELISSA MCCARTHY

For: Bridesmaids
Age: 41
Born: Plainfield, Illinois
Notable work: Gilmore Girls (2000), Mike & Molly (2010)
Oscar History: This is her first nomination

Best Supporting Actress Nominee: JANET MCTEER

For: Albert Nobbs
Age: 50
Born: Newcastle, Tyne and Wear, England
Notable work: Tumbleweeds (1999), Songcatcher (2000), Tideland (2005)
Oscar History: This is her second nomination, both for acting

Best Supporting Actress Nominee: OCTAVIA SPENCER

For: The Help
Age: 49
Born: Montgomery, Alabama
Notable work: Being John Malkovich (1999), Spider Man (2002), Seven Pounds (2008)
Oscar History: This is her first nomination

Who will win Best Supporting Actress?

Octavia Spencer, for her captivating blend of humor and suppressed fury as a maid with an unforgettable recipe for those who’ve wronged her. It’s the sort of breakthrough performance that makes Oscar voters sit up and pay attention.

Who should win Best Supporting Actress?

Janet McTeer, who quietly steals her movie from star Glenn Close. As a woman impersonating a man in late 19th-century Ireland in order to earn a living wage, McTeer’s immersion in male facial expressions and body movements is beyond impressive. Every time she’s on screen, she brings to life what’s essentially a depressing character study.

Best Supporting Actor Nominee: KENNETH BRANAGH

For: My Week With Marilyn
Age: 51
Born: Belfast, Northern Ireland
Notable work: Henry V (1989), Frankenstein (1994), Valkyrie (2008)
Oscar History: This is his fifth nomination (two for acting, two for writing, one for directing)

Best Supporting Actor Nominee: JONAH HILL

For: Moneyball
Age: 28
Born: Los Angeles, California
Notable work: Superbad (2007), Knocked Up (2007)
Oscar History: This is his first nomination

Best Supporting Actor Nominee: NICK NOLTE

For: Warrior
Age: 71
Born: Omaha, Nebraska
Notable work: 48 Hours (1982), The Prince of Tides (1991), Cape Fear (1991), Affliction (1997), The Thin Red Line (1998)
Oscar History: This is his third nomination

Best Supporting Actor Nominee: CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER

For: Beginners
Age: 82
Born: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Notable work: The Sound of Music (1965), A Beautiful Mind (2001), The Last Station (2009)
Oscar History: This is his second nomination

Best Supporting Actor Nominee: MAX VON SYDOW

For: Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
Age: 82
Born: Lund, SkÅne lÄn, Sweden
Notable work: The Exorcist (1973), Pelle the Conqueror (1987), Minority Report (2002), Shutter Island (2010)
Oscar History: This is his second nomination

Who will win Best Supporting Actor?

Christopher Plummer is on an award-season winning streak. The veteran actor is finally being acknowledged by Hollywood with a rush of appreciation for a lifetime of achievement, as well as his understated portrayal of a senior citizen who comes out as a gay man in order to live his final years with grace and honesty. All these years later, Captain Von Trapp is still an imposing presence.

Who should win Best Supporting Actor?

Plummer is a fine choice, but if it’s time to single out a legend who’s never won, why not the venerable Max von Sydow, who is downright amazing as a man swaddled in a grief that’s rendered him mute. It would be an extreme, incredible upset by an actor in a flawed movie, but he deserves it.

Best Director Nominee: WOODY ALLEN

For: Midnight in Paris
Age: 76
Born: Brooklyn, New York
Notable work: Annie Hall (1977), Manhattan (1979), Sweet and Lowdown (1999)
Oscar History: This is his twenty third nomination (once for acting, 15 for writing and 7 for directing). He has won three times, once for directing and twice for writing.

Best Director Nominee: MICHEL HAZANAVICIUS

For: The Artist
Age: 44
Born: Paris, France
Notable work: Mes Amis (1999), OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies (2006)
Oscar History: This is one of three nominations for The Artist this year.

Best Director Nominee: TERRENCE MALICK

For: The Tree of Life
Age: 68
Born: Ottawa, Illinois
Notable work: Days of Heaven (1997), The Thin Red Line (1998), The New World (2005)
Oscar History: This is his third nomination, two for directing, one for writing.

Best Director Nominee: ALEXANDER PAYNE

For: The Descendants
Age: 51
Born: Omaha, Nebraska
Notable work: Election (1999), About Schmidt (2002), Sideways (2004)
Oscar History: This is one of three nominations for The Descendants for Payne. He also has three other previous nominations, winning one for Sideways in 2004.

Best Director Nominee: MARTIN SCORSESE

For: Hugo
Age: 69
Born: Queens, New York City, New York
Notable work: Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), The Age of Innocence (1993), The Departed (2006)
Oscar History: This is his tenth nomination (six for directing, two for writing, one for best picture). He won for The Departed in 2006.

Who will win Best Director?

Michel Hazanavicius. By relying on the silent treatment, the French director created a visual treat and a splendid reminder of how movies seduced the world back in the days before sound, much less computers, ruled the industry. It’s filmmaking stripped down to its essentials, and yet it’s sprinkled with the flair of a cinematic maestro.

Who should win Best Director?

Alexander Payne, who’s become a bard of contemporary American life. No other director has populated so many movies with such a rich tapestry of characters and such respect for the earth-shaking dramas of ordinary lives. Payne has a Shakespearean appetite for the complicated nature of human behavior and an internal GPS for locating the truth of a situation.

Best Adapted Screenplay Nominee: THE DESCENDANTS

Screenplay by: Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon, Jim Rash
Book by: Kaui Hart Hemmings
Directed by: Alexander Payne
Family Media Guide Ratings: Low R, 25% WYT

Best Adapted Screenplay Nominee: HUGO

Screenplay by: John Logan
Book by: Brian Selznick
Directed by: Martin Scorcese
Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG, 93% WYT

Best Adapted Screenplay Nominee: THE IDES OF MARCH

Screenplay by: George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Beau Willimon
Book by: Beau Willimon
Directed by: George Clooney
Family Media Guide Ratings: Low R, 33% WYT

Best Adapted Screenplay Nominee: MONEYBALL

Screenplay by: Steven Zaillian, Aaron Sorkin
Story: Stan Chervin
Book by: Michael Lewis
Directed by: Bennett Miller
Family Media Guide Ratings: Low PG-13, 92% WYT

Best Adapted Screenplay Nominee: TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY

Screenplay by: Bridget O'Connor, Peter Straughan
Book by: John le Carre
Directed by: Tomas Alfredson
Family Media Guide Ratings: High R, 100% WYT

Who will win Best Adapted Screenplay?
Aaron Sorkin, Bennett Miller (AP)

Somebody turned a saga of pro-sports financing into a meditation on mid-life ambition, stunted dreams and the pursuit of happiness? You just hit a grand slam, “Moneyball” guys.

Who should win Best Adapted Screenplay?

As much as we’d like to tout “The Ides of March,” a made-partly-in-Michigan movie with snappy dialogue and bold cynicism, “Moneyball” is the clear MVP. It’s a throwback to the 1970s brand of filmmaking that took its time to tell a story and immersed itself in the language of real situations, in this instance, a Major League Baseball organization.

Best Original Screenplay Nominee: THE ARTIST

Screenplay by: Michel Hazanavicius
Directed by: Michel Hazanavicius
Family Media Guide Ratings: PG-13, 100% WYT

Best Original Screenplay Nominee: BRIDESMAIDS

Screenplay by: Kristen Wiig, Annie Mumolo
Directed by: Paul Feig
Family Media Guide Ratings: Low R, 31% WYT

Best Original Screenplay Nominee: MARGIN CALL

Screenplay by: J.C. Chandor
Directed by: J.C. Chandor
Family Media Guide Ratings: High R, 50% WYT

Best Original Screenplay Nominee: MIDNIGHT IN PARIS

Screenplay by: Woody Allen
Directed by: Woody Allen
Family Media Guide Ratings: High PG, 81% WYT

Best Original Screenplay Nominee: A SEPARATION

Screenplay by: Asghar Farhadi
Directed by: Asghar Farhadi
Family Media Guide Ratings: PG-13, 100% WYT

Who will win Best Original Screenplay?

“Midnight in Paris,” Woody Allen’s humorous rumination on the intellectual implications of the grass always being greener in another era. Hollywood admires Allen’s ability to dream up a minor masterpiece every 10 years or so, like this time-traveling truffle that allows the Allen substitute, Owen Wilson, to rub shoulders with Fitzgerald and Hemingway.

Who should win Best Original Screenplay?

“Bridesmaids.” With deceptive ease, Annie Mumolo and Kristen Wiig created female characters who were believable and outrageous. They deftly illustrate why the best comedies are grounded in real-life responses to envy, insecurity, self-delusion, self-loathing and , eventually, acceptance — the five stages of hilarity.