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Six more players were in town Monday morning as the Jazz continue to look at as many draft eligible players as possible. Like many of the players in the first few groups to come in for pre-draft workouts, none of the players that were in on Monday are considered first-round talent. The most notable names in the group are a pair of players from Ohio State in Aaron Craft and LaQuinton Ross. Local college basketball fans should recognize two other names from the group in Cameron Bairstow from New Mexico and Roscoe Smith from UNLV.

Here is a look at how each of the six workout attendees performed in college:

Aaron Craft, 6-2, 195, point guard, Ohio State
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Craft is a pass-first point guard who does whatever it takes for his team to win. At Ohio State, he was also a lockdown defender. Craft isn't much of a threat from the perimeter on offense, making just 30.2 percent of his 3-point attempts as a senior, but he does have the ability to get into the paint and create easy scoring chances for his teammates.

In fact, his 694 assists are the second most of any player in the Big 10 since 1997-98, according to sports-reference.com. Craft also excels on the defensive end of the floor where he was named the 2012-14 NABC Defensive Player of the Year.

He is a tenacious on-ball defender and great in the passing lanes. He led the Big 10 in steals in three of his four seasons and ended his college career with 2.3 steals a game. His most impressive season came as a senior when Craft averaged 9.8 points, 3.6 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 2.5 steals in 35 games.

For his career, Craft averaged 8.9 points, 3.3 rebounds and 4.7 assists in 148 games for the Buckeyes.

LaQuinton Ross, 6-8, 220, forward, Ohio State
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Ross left the Buckeyes after a junior season where he led the team in scoring and rebounding. Ross has a decent touch from the outside, but is most effective when he is going to the rim because of his length. His most productive season came in 2013-14 when he averaged 15.2 points and 5.9 rebounds in 35 games.

For his career, Ross averaged 10.6 points and four rebounds in 81 games.

Cameron Bairstow, 6-9, 250, forward, New Mexico
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Bairstow made a massive jump in minutes and production during his four seasons on the floor for the Lobos. The athletic big man can play both the four and five position because of his reach and impressive jumping ability. His best season came as a senior when Bairstow averaged 20.4 points on 55.6 percent shooting from the floor, 7.4 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.5 blocks in 34 games.

For his career, he averaged 9.2 points and 4.8 rebounds in 134 contests.

Billy Baron, 6-2, 195, point guard, Canisius
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Baron played at three different schools over his college career, including his last two years for his father at Canisius. Baron is a solid rebounder and a great passer who really knows how to score the ball. After putting up good numbers during his sophomore and junior seasons, Baron had a massive year in 2013-14 when he averaged 24.1 points on 42.1 percent shooting from beyond the arc and 88.4 percent shooting from the free-throw line. He also added 4.9 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 1.6 steals in 34 games.

For his career, Baron averaged 16.3 points, 3.9 rebounds, four assists and 1.1 steals in 105 games playing for Virginia, Rhode Island and Canisius.

James Bell, 6-6, 225, guard, Villanova
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Bell is a solid scorer who does most of his damage from the 3-point line where he made 85 shots during his senior year, according to sports-reference.com. His numbers and production improved each of his four seasons on the floor for the Wildcats. Bell had his best season by far in 2013-14 as a senior when he averaged 14.4 points, 6.1 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.3 steals in 34 games.

For his career, Bell averaged 8.6 points, four rebounds and 1.2 assists in 122 games.

Roscoe Smith, 6-8, 215, forward, UNLV
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Smith declared for the draft after playing just one season with the Running Rebels. The junior forward played his first two seasons of college ball with the UConn Huskies before heading to the desert. His lone season was very a successful one for Smith who led the Mountain West Conference in rebounding, according to sports-reference.com. That season he averaged 11.1 points on 54.4 percent shooting from the field to go along with 10.9 rebounds in 31 games.

For his career, Smith averaged 7.1 points and 6.3 rebounds in 105 games.