The collective heart of Utah Jazz fans broke on Tuesday night when they saw the Jazz logo pulled out and placed in the fifth spot in the NBA Draft Lottery. Gone are the hopes of drafting franchise changing players Andrew Wiggins, Joel Embiid, Jabari Parker and even Dante Exum.

All is not lost though. There will be plenty of extremely talented young players on the board when the Jazz make their selection. As in years past, there is sure to be a gem or two there for the taking if the Utah brass make the right choice.

If fans don't believe that, all they have to do is look at the players drafted with the fifth pick over the last few decades. The list is so deep that an all-star didn't even make the top 25.

Honorable mention: Isaiah Rider (UNLV)

Rider was the fifth overall pick by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 1993 draft. He played nine seasons in the NBA for the Timberwolves, Portland Trail Blazers, Los Angeles Lakers, Atlanta Hawks and the Denver Nuggets. His most productive season came with Minnesota in 1994-95 when he averaged a career-high 20.4 points, 3.3 rebounds and 3.3 assists in 75 games.

For his career, he averaged 16.7 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.7 assists in 562 games.

Honorable mention: Ricky Rubio (Barcelona)

Rubio was the fifth overall pick by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 2009 draft. It took two seasons before he joined the Wolves, but he has done a good job running the show ever since. His best season came in 2013-14 when he started all 82 games for the first time in his three years and averaged 9.5 points, 4.2 rebounds, 8.6 assists and 2.3 steals.

For his career, he has averaged 10.1 points, 4.1 rebounds, 8.1 assists and 2.3 steals in 180 games.

Honorable mention: Kendall Gill (Illinois)

Gill was the fifth overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets in the 1990 draft. He played 15 seasons for the Hornets, Seattle SuperSonics, New Jersey Nets, Miami Heat, Minnesota Timberwolves, Chicago Bulls and the Milwaukee Bucks. His best season came with the Nets in 1996-97 when he averaged a career-high 21.8 points, 6.1 rebounds, four assists and 1.9 steals.

For his career, he averaged 13.4 points, 4.1 rebounds, three assists and 1.6 steals in 966 games.

Honorable mention: Mike Miller (Florida)

Miller was taken with the fifth overall pick by the Orlando Magic in the 2000 draft. He has played 14 seasons for the Magic, Memphis Grizzlies, Minnesota Timberwolves, Washington Wizards and the Miami Heat. His best statistical season came with the Grizzlies in 2006-07 when he averaged a career-high 18.5 points, 5.4 rebounds and 4.3 assists in 70 games.

To this point in his career, he has averaged 11.8 points, 4.6 rebounds and 2.8 assists in 913 games.

Honorable mention: Devin Harris (Wisconsin)

Harris was taken with the fifth overall pick by the Washington Wizards in the 2004 draft. He has played 10 seasons for the Dallas Mavericks, New Jersey Nets, Utah Jazz and the Atlanta Hawks. His best season came with the Nets in 2008-09 when he made his lone all-star game after averaging 21.3 points, 3.3 rebounds, 6.9 assists and 1.7 steals in 69 games.

To this point in his career, he has averaged 12.5 points, 2.4 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 1.1 steals in 641 games.

No. 25: Kermit Washington (American University)

Washington was taken by the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1973 draft. He played for 10 seasons with the Lakers, Boston Celtics, San Diego Clippers, Portland Trail Blazers and the Golden State Warriors. Even though most of today's basketball fans have only heard of him because of one play (punching Rudy Tomjanovich), he was a very productive player during his time in the league. His best season came with the Trail Blazers in 1979-80 when he made the all-star game after averaging a career-high 13.4 points on 55.3 percent shooting from the floor, 10.5 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.6 blocks.

For his career, he averaged 9.2 points, 8.3 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.1 blocks in 507 games.

No. 24: Sam Lacey (New Mexico State)

Lacey, far left in photo, was selected by the Cincinnati Royals in the 1970 draft. He played 13 seasons with the Royals/Kings, New Jersey Nets and Cleveland Cavaliers. He was a monster on the glass and averaged a double-double in points and rebounds during the first six seasons of his career. His best statistical season came with the Kansas City-Omaha Kings in 1973-74 when he averaged a career-high 14.2 points on 47.6 percent shooting from the field, 13.4 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 1.6 steals and 2.3 blocks in 79 games. A year later he made his only all-star appearance after averaging 11.5 points and 2.1 blocks to go along with career highs in rebounds (14.2 per game), assists (5.3 per game) and steals (1.7 per game).

For his career, he averaged 10.3 points, 9.7 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.5 blocks in 1,002 games.


No. 23: DeMarcus Cousins (Kentucky)

Cousins was taken by the Sacramento Kings in the 2010 draft. He has played for the Kings during his four seasons in the league. When he is on his game, he is nearly unguardable. His best season so far came in 2013-14 when he averaged 22.7 points on 49.6 percent shooting from the field, 11.7 rebounds, 2.9 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.3 blocks in 71 games.

To this point in his young career, he has averaged 17.9 points, 10.2 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.4 steals and one block in 291 games.

No. 22: Jason Richardson (Michigan State)

Richardson was selected by the Golden State Warriors in the 2001 draft. He has played 12 seasons for the Warriors, Charlotte Bobcats, Phoenix Suns, Orlando Magic and the Philadelphia 76ers. Early on in his career, Richardson was one of the most explosive players the NBA had ever seen. He would attack the basket and finish with some of the most impressive dunks. Although he was never considered a great shooter, Richardson could really score the ball. His best statistical season came with the Warriors in 2005-06 when he averaged 23.2 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.3 steals in 75 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.3 points, five rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.2 steals in 838 games.

No. 21: Juwan Howard (Michigan)

Howard was taken be the Washington Bullets in the 1994 draft. Howard played 19 seasons for the Bullets/Wizards, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets, Houston Rockets, Orlando Magic, Charlotte Bobcats, Portland Trail Blazers and the Miami Heat. His best season came with the Bullets in 1995-96 when Howard played more than 40 minutes a night and averaged 22.1 points, 8.1 rebounds and 4.4 assists. Those numbers were good enough for Howard to make the all-star game that year.

For his career, he averaged 13.4 points, 6.1 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 1,208 games.

No. 20: Jack Marin (Duke)

Marin, at right in photo, was taken by the Baltimore Bullets in the 1966 draft. He played for 11 seasons for the Bullets, Houston Rockets, Buffalo Braves and the Chicago Bulls. His best season came with the Bullets in 1971-72 when he made his first all-star game after averaging 22.3 points on the strength of a league-leading 89.4 percent shooting from the free-throw line, 6.8 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 78 games.

For his career, the two-time all-star averaged 14.8 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 849 games.

No. 19: Steve Smith (Michigan State)

Smith was taken by the Miami Heat in the 1991 draft. He played 14 seasons with the Heat, Atlanta Hawks, Portland Trail Blazers, San Antonio Spurs, New Orleans Hornets and the Charlotte Bobcats. His best season came with the Atlanta Hawks in 1997-98 when he made his only all-star appearance after averaging 20.1 points, 4.2 rebounds, four assists and one steal in 73 games.

For his career, he averaged 14.3 points, 3.2 rebounds and 3.1 assists in 942 games.

No. 18: Purvis Short (Jackson State)

Short was taken by the Golden State Warriors in the 1978 draft. Short played 12 seasons for the Warriors, Houston Rockets and the New Jersey Nets. His best stretch came with the Warriors when he finished in the top 10 in the league in scoring three straight seasons. His most productive season came with Golden State in 1984-85 when he averaged 28 points, 5.1 rebounds, three assists and 1.5 steals in 78 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.3 points, 4.3 rebounds, 2.5 assists and one steal in 842 games.

No. 17: Frank Ramsey (Kentucky)

Ramsey was selected by the Boston Celtics in the 1953 NBA draft. He played his entire nine-year career with the Celtics and was a huge part of seven NBA Championship teams. His most productive season came in 1957-58 when he averaged a career-high 16.5 points, 7.3 rebounds and 2.4 assists in 69 games.

For his career, he averaged 13.4 points, 5.5 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 623 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982.

No. 16: Johnny Green (Michigan State)

Green was taken by the New York Knicks in the 1959 draft. He played 14 seasons for the Knicks, Baltimore Bullets, San Diego Rockets, Philadelphia 76ers and the Cincinnati Royals. Green averaged a double-double in points and rebounds in five different seasons, including four of his first five years in the league. The four-time all-star had his most productive season in 1962-63 with the Knicks when he tallied a career-high 18.1 points to go along with 12.1 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 11.6 points, 8.6 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 1,057 games.

No. 15: Jeff Mullins (Duke)

Mullins, at left in photo, was selected by the St. Louis Hawks in the 1964 draft. He played 12 seasons for the Hawks and the San Francisco/Golden State Warriors. The best stretch of his career came with the Warriors when he averaged at least 20 points a game for four straight seasons and made three consecutive all-star games. His best statistical year came in 1971-72 when he averaged 21.5 points, 5.6 rebounds and 5.9 assists in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 16.2 points, 4.3 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 804 games.

No. 14: Kevin Love (UCLA)

Love was taken by the Memphis Grizzlies in the 2008 draft and then traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves. He has been with the Timberwolves for six seasons and is one of the best power forwards in the game today. He has finished in the top three in the NBA in scoring in his last three full seasons along with finishing in the top five in scoring twice. His most productive season came in 2013-14 when Love averaged 26.1 points, 12.5 rebounds and 4.4 assists.

To this point in his career, the three-time all-star has averaged 19.2 points, 12.2 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 364 games.

No. 13: Bobby Jones (North Carolina)

Jones, at left in photo, was selected by the Houston Rockets in the 1974 draft. He played 12 seasons in the ABA and NBA with the Denver Nuggets and the Philadelphia 76ers. Jones was one of the best defensive players of his era and also a very effective offensive player. His most productive season in the NBA came with the Nuggets in 1976-77 when Jones averaged 15.1 points on 57 percent shooting from the field, 8.3 rebounds, 3.2 assists, 2.3 steals and two blocks in 82 games.

For his career, the five-time all-star averaged 12.1 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.7 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.4 blocks in 941 games. He also earned first-team all-defense in his first 10 seasons as a pro.

No. 12: Larry Foust (LaSalle)

Foust (No. 14 in picture) was taken by the Chicago Stags in the 1950 draft. He played 12 seasons in the NBA for the Fort Wayne Pistons, Minneapolis Lakers and the St. Louis Hawks. He was one of the best centers in the early days of the NBA. He was a dominant rebounder who made eight all-star games in his first nine seasons in the league. His best statistical season came with the Pistons in 1954-55 when he averaged a career-high 17 points while leading the league in field-goal percentage (48.7) to go along with 10 rebounds in 70 games.

For his career, he averaged 13.7 points, 9.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists in 817 games.


No. 11: Walter Davis (North Carolina)

Davis was selected by the Phoenix Suns in the 1977 draft. He played 15 seasons for the Suns, Denver Nuggets and Portland Trail Blazers. He was an instant success right when he stepped on the floor for the Suns. He was named to the All-NBA Second Team in his first two seasons and made the all-star team four straight years. His best statistical season came in 1978-79 when he averaged 23.6 points on 56.1 percent shooting from the floor, 4.7 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.9 steals in 79 games.

For his career, the six-time all-star averaged 18.9 points on 51.1 percent shooting, three rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.2 steals in 1,033 games.

No. 10: Sidney Moncrief (Arkansas)

Moncrief was taken by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 1979 draft. He played 11 seasons for the Bucks and the Atlanta Hawks. He was one of the best players in the NBA for a five-year stretch. He made five consecutive all-star games from 1982 to 1986, made first-team all-defense four times and was First- or Second-Team All-NBA selection each season. During that time Moncrief also won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year in back-to-back seasons. His best statistical season came in 1984-85 when he averaged 21.7 points, 5.4 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.6 steals in 73 games.

For his career, he averaged 15.6 points, 4.7 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.2 steals in 767 games.

No. 9: Vince Carter (North Carolina)

Carter was taken by the Golden State Warriors in 1998 draft and traded to the Toronto Raptors. He has played for 16 seasons with the Raptors, New Jersey Nets, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and the Dallas Mavericks. He averaged at least 20 points a game for 10 straight seasons while making eight consecutive all-star games. His best year came in 2000-01 when he averaged a career-high 27.6 points, 5.5 rebounds, 3.9 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.1 blocks in 75 games.

To this point in his career he has averaged 20.2 points, 4.9 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.1 steals in 1,148 games.

No. 8: Ray Allen (UConn)

Allen was taken by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 1996 draft and then traded to the Milwaukee Bucks. Allen has played 18 seasons for the Bucks, Seattle SuperSonics, Boston Celtics and the Miami Heat. He is one of the games legendary shooters and has been since the beginning of his career. His best stretch came in his time with Seattle when he averaged 24.6 points, 4.6 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.3 steals in four and a half seasons.

To this point in his career, the 10-time all-star has averaged 18.9 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.1 steals in 1,300 games.

No. 7: Mitch Richmond (Kansas State)

Richmond (No. 23 in picture) was taken by the Golden State Warriors in the 1988 draft. He played 14 seasons for the Warriors, Sacramento Kings, Washington Wizards and the Los Angeles Lakers. He averaged at least 20 points a game in his first 10 seasons in the league. His best stretch came with the Kings from 1992 to 1998 when he was named to six all-star teams and made All-NBA Second or Third Team five consecutive years. His best of those years came with the Kings in 1996-97 when he averaged 25.9 points. 3.9 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.5 steals in 81 games.

For his career, he averaged 21 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.2 steals in 976 games. He is part of the 2014 class to be inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

No. 6: Billy Cunningham (North Carolina)

Cunningham was selected by the Philadelphia 76ers in the 1965 draft. He spent 11 seasons in the NBA and ABA with the 76ers and the Carolina Cougars. He was a five-time all-star who was a dominating rebounder and scorer. After four straight seasons as an NBA all NBA First- or Second-Team selection he moved to the ABA and won the MVP award after he averaged 24.1 points, 12 rebounds, 6.3 assists and 2.6 steals in 84 games.

For his career, he averaged 21.2 points, 10.4 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.8 steals in 770 games. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1986.

No. 5: Scottie Pippen (Central Arkansas)

Pippen was taken by the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1987 draft and then traded to the Chicago Bulls. He played 17 seasons for the Bulls, Houston Rockets and the Portland Trail Blazers. He had his best years with the Bulls when he won six NBA Championships and made seven all-star games. His best season in Chicago came in 1993-94 when he averaged 22 points, 8.7 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 2.9 steals in 72 games.

For his career, he averaged 16.1 points, 6.4 rebounds, 5.2 assists and two steals in 1,178 games. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

No. 4: Walt Frazier (Southern Illinois)

Frazier was selected by the New York Knicks in the 1967 draft. He played 13 seasons with the Knicks and the Cleveland Cavaliers. His best years came with New York where he made seven straight all-star games and was a huge piece to a pair of championships. During that time he was named to the all-defensive first team seven straight years while earning All-NBA First- or Second-Team honors six times. One of his best years came with the Knicks in 1971-72 when he averaged a career-high 23.2 points on 51.2 percent shooting from the field to go along with 6.7 rebounds and 5.8 assists.

For his career, he averaged 18.9 points, 5.9 rebounds, 6.1 assists and 1.9 steals in 825 games. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1987.

No. 3: Dwyane Wade (Marquette)

Wade was taken by the Miami Heat in the 2003 draft. He has spent his entire 11-year career with the Heat and been a part of three NBA Championship teams. Wade has made the all-star team 10 consecutive seasons as well as being named to the All-NBA First, Second or Third Team eight times. His best statistical season came 2008-09 when he averaged a league-leading 30.2 points, five rebounds, 7.5 assists, 2.2 steals and 1.3 blocks in 79 games.

To this point in his career, he has averaged 24.3 points, five rebounds, six assists, 1.8 steals and one block in 719 games.

No. 2: Charles Barkley (Auburn)

Barkley was selected by the Philadelphia 76ers in the 1984 draft. He played 16 seasons for the 76ers, Phoenix Suns and the Houston Rockets. The 11-time all-star averaged a double-double in points and rebounds in his last 15 years in the league. He earned All-NBA First-, Second- or Third-Team honors 11 times and was named the NBA MVP in 1992-93. That year he averaged 25.6 points, 12.2 rebounds, 5.1 assists, 1.6 steals and one block in 76 games.

For his career, he averaged 22.1 points, 11.7 rebounds, 3.9 assists and 1.5 steals in 1,073 games. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

No. 1: Kevin Garnett (Farragut Academy)

Garnett was taken by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 1995 draft. Garnett has played 19 seasons for the Timberwolves, Boston Celtics and the Brooklyn Nets. He has earned All-NBA First-, Second- or Third-Team honors nine times as well as NBA All-Defensive First- or Second-Team plaudits 12 times. Garnett was the NBA MVP in 2003-04 when he averaged 24.2 points, 13.9 rebounds, five assists, 1.5 steals and 2.2 blocks in 82 games.

To this point in his career, the 15-time all-star has averaged 18.6 points, 10.3 rebounds, 3.9 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.5 blocks in 1,377 games.