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As the economy continues to trudge toward recovery, those now re-entering the job market must decide which industries to join.

Last January, to help those looking for work, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released a report of the fastest-growing industries. Everything from computer system and design-related work to child care services were projected to see major demand increases in the coming years.

Job seekers might also need to consider more recent information from the bureau, however.

In August, the BLS released its report of the most dangerous jobs in the country. According to the most recent statistics, a total of 4,383 fatal work injuries were recorded in 2012, many of which were concentrated within 10 careers.

While the study shows that overall, the most dangerous industries have declined in fatal injuries, it’s important to note that one of the jobs listed in the BLS study as being particularly dangerous is also included in the list of the fastest-growing industries: construction.

So as the currently unemployed — or those who wish to switch careers — consider their job options, understanding the potential risks of the country's most dangerous professions could make all the difference.

10 Construction laborers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 17.4

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 210.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, fatal work injuries in the private construction sector saw a 5 percent increase in 2012.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

9 Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 21.3

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 216

According to the BLS, Farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers saw a 19 percent decline in fatal injuries 2012.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

8 Driver/sales workers and truck drivers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 22.1

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 741

According to the BLS, Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers had the highest number of fatal injuries among any of the transportation subgroups.

This year, the BLS recorded a 4 percent drop in fatalities in2012.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

7 Electrical power-line installers and repairers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 23.0

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 26







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers


6 Refuse and recyclable material collectors
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 27.1

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 26







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers


5 Structural iron and steel workers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 37.0

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 22







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers


4 Roofers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 40.5

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 70

According to the BLS, fatal injuries to roofers saw a 17 percent rise from 2011. It is the highest fatal injuries count in 5 years.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

3 Aircraft pilots and flight engineers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 53.4

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 71

According to the BLS, fatal injuries for aircraft pilots and flight engineers actually dropped by 14 percent in 2012.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

2 Fishers and related fishing workers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 117.0

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012: 32

Fishers and related fishing workers also saw a large drop in fatal injuries in 2012. According to the BLS, this category saw a 24 percent drop in fatal injuries this year.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

1 Logging workers
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*Current fatal work injury rate: 127.8

Total number of fatal injuries in 2012:

According to the BLS, Logging workers have seen relatively stagnant fatal injury rates for the past three years.







*Per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers