Associated Press

The battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1-3, 1863, with locations like Devil's Den, the Wheatfield and Little Round Top gaining notoriety for their part in the bloodiest conflict of the Civil War, where more than 51,000 soldiers were killed.

The iconic Gettysburg Address, a speech given by President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery, took place on Nov. 19, 1963.

"We can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground," Lincoln said. "The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here."

Here's a look — sometimes brutal, sometimes graphic — of that terrible battle, its aftermath and the historic speech that followed.

Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, President Abraham Lincoln is shown at the site of his Gettysburg Address, in Gettysburg, Pa., on Nov. 19, 1863.

This photo shows a physician about to amputate a soldier's leg in a makeshift hospital camp site for the Union Army at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863, during the American Civil War.

Associated Press

In July 1863, an unidentified Union soldier shown March 12, 1985, died in battle at Gettysburg clutching a photograph of his three children. All four went unidentified until November 1863, when a woman in Portsville, N.Y., saw the photos in a religious publication and identified them as her husband Sgt. Amos Humiston and their three children. In 1866, indirectly inspired by the incident, the Soldiers’ Orphans home was erected in Gettysburg, with Mrs. Humiston and her three children being part of its first 100 residents.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo, titled, "The children of the battlefield," shows the reproduction of the tintype portrait of Frank, Frederick and Alice Humiston, children of Sergeant Amos Humiston of Co. C, 154th New York Infantry Regiment, who died at Gettysburg with the photograph in his hands.

Associated Press

This is an artist's rendition of the Confederate attack on the Union lines known as Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg, Pa. George E. Pickett's charge took place on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg that began on July 1. The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia did not succeed in forcing the Union Army of the Potomac to retreat.

Associated Press

Confederate soldiers are shown during the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, as Gen. George E. Pickett orders his 15,000 men to charge.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

John L. Burns, the "old hero of Gettysburg," is shown with gun and crutches.

Burns, age 69 and living in Gettysburg, was at home when the battle began and volunteered to join with the Union forces at the center of some of the battle's hottest action. He received a bullet through the arm, another through his calf and other wounds. After convincing the Confederate Army that he was not a combatant, they treated his wounds and he was able to return home. President Abraham Lincoln later requested to meet Burns after his story spread across the country.

Read his 1872 obituary in The New York Times.

Associated Press

In this drawing by combat artist Alfred R. Waud, Lieut. Bayard Wilkeson, on horseback, directs the fire of the 4th U.S. Artillery against the Confederate ranks during the battle of Gettysburg, July 4, 1863.

Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, dead Confederate soldiers lie at the edge of the Rose Woods in Gettysburg, Pa., following the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War, July 5, 1863.

Associated Press

The first draft of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address is shown on Nov. 2, 1950. The president delivered the address at the dedication of the Gettysburg, Pa., battlefield cemetery on Nov. 19, 1863. Lincoln gave the first draft to his secretary, John Hay, whose children presented it to the Library of Congress in 1916. It is written on one side of two sheets of paper in ink. Most of the concluding sentence is written in pencil.

Associated Press

This undated illustration depicts President Abraham Lincoln making his Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pa., Nov. 19, 1863. The cemetery commemorates soldiers who died in the American Civil War Battle of Gettysburg in July.

Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, dead Confederate soldiers have been gathered for burial at the southwestern edge of the Rose Woods in Gettysburg, Pa., following the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War, July 5, 1863.

Associated Press

Top: President Abraham Lincoln (circled) speaking at the dedication of Soldiers National Cemetery on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pa., November 19, 1863.

Bottom: A longer view of the scene on ground still marked by evidences of the bloody battle four months earlier. The photo at top is an enlargement of the marked off rectangular area.

It is believed this may be the only photo of Lincoln at the dedication where he made the four minute speech which was to become a world classic. It was found in 1953 in the National Archives in Washington where it had gone unnoticed.

Associated Press

This is a photo of Baltimore Street in Gettysburg, Pa., on Nov. 19, 1863. The photograph was taken a few minutes before U.S. President Abraham Lincoln rode over this road to the Gettysburg National Cemetery during its dedication where he made the Gettysburg Address.

Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, rear view of the camp of Captain John J. Hoff of the Union Army in Gettysburg, Pa., in July 1865.

Associated Press

This cyclorama painting of the Battle of Gettysburg is 376 by 22 feet high.

Associated Press

This is an undated etching of Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick. It was during the Civil War battle of Gettysburg that Sedgwick gave the order that has become legend to Vermont's military community: "Put the Vermonters ahead and keep everything well closed up." The order was given as the 20,000 soldiers of Sedgwick's 6th Corps were marching toward Gettysburg, 32 miles up the Baltimore Pike. Union Gen. George Meade needed the reinforcements to help turn back the invasion of Pennsylvania that had been launched by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Associated Press

This photograph from the Library of Congress provided by Abrams Books shows an unidentified Confederate and Union soldier in a photo titled "The Blue and the Grey at Gettysburg, Assembly Tent" on the 50th anniversary reunion at Gettysburg, Penn., in 1913.

Associated Press

In an undated photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society Alonzo Cushing, left, poses with, from left, Capt. L. Kipp; Major Clark; Lt. Col. Joseph Taylor; Major General E.V. Sumner; Capt. Samuel Sumner; Surgeon Hammond; Lt. Col. Lawrence. Cushing got the nation's highest military decoration this summer — the Medal of Honor — nearly 150 years after he died at the battle of Gettysburg.

Associated Press

This July 1863 photo provided by the Library of Congress shows unfinished Confederate graves near the center of the battlefield in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

This drawing shows the battle of Gettysburg at its height July 3, 1863, showing activity behind the Union lines on Cemetery Hill, with force resting and regrouping amid the carnage of battle. The three day battle, which ended in victory for the North, involved a total of 191,480 men on both the Confederate and Union sides. Over 600 field guns were engaged in the furious battle. This scene was drawn by combat artist Alfred R. Waud.

Deseret News archives

This undated handout image provided by the Library of Congress shows John F. Chase. who lost his right arm and left eye at Gettysburg

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photograph shows many dead horses on the ground in front of Abraham Trostle's house near the headquarters of General Daniel Edgar Sickles.

Associated Press

Dead soldiers, most of whom are Union soldiers, lay on the battlefield at Gettysburgh, Pa. after Gen. Robert E. Lee retreated from the Battle of Gettysburg on July 5, 1863. Their shoes have been stripped from their feet, and the pockets of some of them have been rifled.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This stereograph shows General George G. Meade's headquarters on Cemetery Ridge after the battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The bodies of horses shot during the fighting can be seen in the distance.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo gives a view of breastworks on Round Top.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Confederate dead gathered for burial at the edge of the Rose woods, July 5, 1863.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This view of the battlefield at Gettysburg shows temporary entrenchments thrown up by the Federal troops on Little Round Top. Big Round Top is in the background

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Robert E. Lee's headquarters, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

View at Losser's (i.e. Trostle's) barn, where the 9th Massachusetts Battery was cut up. The picture shows horses killed during the battle lying in the barnyard.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows Gettysburg, Pa., in 1863 at the dedication of the Gettysburg battlefield.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows the battlefield of Gettysburg, and a view of the point of woods where Major General John Fulton Reynolds was killed on July 1, 1863. Reynolds was the highest ranking officer killed at Gettysburg and one of the most senior in the war, according to the Gettysburg Stone Sentinels website.

"His decision to commit his infantry west of Gettysburg set the course of the fighting, but his death early in the battle was a serious blow to the Union Army," the site said.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Men gather at Gettysburg, Pa., for the laying of the cornerstone of the Soldier's National Monument on the anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The men on the left are preparing food.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows the headquarters of Gen. George G. Meade of the Union Army on Cemetery Ridge.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows the headquarters of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, July 1863.

Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, a dead Confederate soldier lies in "the devil's den" in Gettysburg, Pa., following the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War, July 5, 1863.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

G.J. White's house, photographed in June or July of 1863, is in the vicinity of Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photograph shows the breastworks on Little Round Top.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photograph shows the center of the Federal position, as viewed from Little Round Top.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photograph shows the meadow over which the 2d Mass. and 27th Indiana charged on the morning of July 3rd. into woods that were occupied by Confederates, Johnson's Div., Ewell's Corps. Four men stand at the fence looking toward the meadow where the battle was fought.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This panorama shows the location of the second day of battle at Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This panorama shows the location of the third day of battle and Gen. Mead's headquarters at Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This 1909 photograph shows East Cemetery Hill #1, in Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This 1918 photo shows the Gettysburg battlefield.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The photo showing the battlefield of Gettysburg includes an image of McPherson's woods, in which Confederate Brigadier General James Jay Archer's Brigade was captured, and a view of the side toward the Chambersburg Pike, where the battle began.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows the dedication of the monument at the Gettysburg cemetery.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This Gettysburg battlefield image shows the location of Pickett's charge.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo, titled, "The wheat field," shows casualties of the battle at Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows battle casualties on Little Round Top.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Three Confederate prisoners are shown at Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This Gettysburg photo shows an artillery caisson and dead mule.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows a line of breastworks on Round Top at Gettysburg in 1863.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows dead soldiers in a ravine known as the "slaughter pen," at the foot of Round Top in Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows dead soldiers in a ravine known as the "slaughter pen," at the foot of Round Top in Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Joseph Dickinson of Maine was brevetted for gallantry of staff duty at Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows a scene in the woods at foot of Round Top at the battle of Gettysburg.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This print, based on the painting called "Hancock at Gettysburg" by Thure de Thulstrup, shows Major General Winfield S. Hancock riding along the Union lines during the Confederate bombardment prior to Pickett's Charge.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This drawing shows General Samuel Wylie Crawford's charge on the Rebel lines.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This photo shows the General Hospital at Gettysburg in August 1863 after the battle.

This photo of a drawing shows the Union army galloping into action on horseback at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pa, which took place July 1-3, 1863 during the American Civil War.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Gen. Samuel K. Zook was killed at Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863.

Members of the United States Sanitary Commission pose outside the tent during the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 during the American Civil War.

Famed Civil War photographer Mathew B. Brady captured the town of Gettysburg, Pa. with his camera shortly after the three-day Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, in 1863. Hospital tents can be seen inthe field at right.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

This drawing shows the battle of Gettysburg, depicting Confederate General James Longstreet's attack upon the Union's left center. Blue Ridge is in the distance.

In this photo provided by the Library of Congress, a dead Confederate soldier is shown in Devil's Den, Gettysburg, Pa., in July 1863. This photograph is titled "The Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg."

This is the field hospital headquarters at the battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War, July 1863.

This was the scene at the battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War, July 1863.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Col. E.E. Cross, 5th N.H. Inf. U.S.A., was killed at Gettysburg.

Illustration of the last Confederate gun at Gettysburg in 1863. Gettysburg was the most violent battle of the American Civil War and marked the end of the Confederate northward invasions.

The cover title of a 16-page pamphlet, printed a few days after Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, is shown on April 21, 1942. The document contains the speeches of President Lincoln and Edward Everett made at the Battlefield dedication in Gettysburgh, Pa., on Nov. 19, 1862.