How much do you know about the Mormon pioneers and early Utah history? Test your knowledge of the people, places and events surrounding July 24, 1847, and the Mormon colonization of the West. Related: A photographic look back at the Days of '47 Parade, from 1864 to 2015 Related: See what the pioneers thought, felt as they first came to the Salt Lake Valley Related: A photographic look at how Days of '47 floats have changed — or not — from 1897 to 2014 Related: From Kings Peak to Bryce Canyon, meet 26 of the faces behind Utah places

Question 1
Deseret News archives

What day did the first wagons leave Nauvoo and cross the Mississippi?

A. April 6, 1846

B. February 4, 1846

C. January 31, 1846

D. March 1, 1846

>> The Nauvoo temple in 1846.

Answer
Deseret News archives

B. February 4, 1846

The winter exodus from Nauvoo was not expected, and the Latter-day Saints could have remained in their homes "had it not been for the threats and hostile demonstrations of our enemies," Brigham Young wrote. "Our only means of avoiding a rupture was by starting in midwinter."

"Our homes, gardens, orchards, farms, streets, bridges, mills, public halls, magnificent temple, and other public improvements we leave as a monument of our patriotism, industry, economy, uprightness of purpose and integrity of heart; and as a living testimony of the falsehood and wickedness of those who charge us with disloyalty to the Constitution of our country, idleness and dishonesty," he continued.

>> C.CA. Christensen's painting, shown here, depicts the exodus from the city across the frozen Mississippi River.

Question 2
August Miller, Deseret News

How many men did the government ask to volunteer for what became the Mormon Battalion, which served in the war against Mexico?

A. 300

B. 900

C. 250

D. 500

>> Company A. Mormon Volunteers, Historic Re-enactors line up for the presentation of colors at the start of the dedication ceremony for the Mormon Battalion Monument at This is the Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City, Utah, Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010.

Answer
August Miller, Deseret News

D. 500

The call for volunteers for the U.S. war against Mexico came at a difficult time for the Latter-day Saints, after they had fled from Nauvoo and as they were preparing to winter at the Missouri River.

In exchange for raising 500 volunteers for the war, Brigham Young extracted a promise that the government would allow the Saints to winter on Indian land without any trouble. Young asked for 500 volunteers and promised the men that he would do his best "to see all their families brought forward, as far as my influence extended, and feed them when I had anything to eat myself."

Some 543 men volunteered.

>> Company A. Mormon Volunteers, Historic Re-enactors fire their muskets after the presentation of colors at the start of the dedication ceremony for the Mormon Battalion Monument at This is the Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City, Utah, Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010.

Question 3
Laura Seitz, Deseret News

Counting the state that is home to Nauvoo, what five states did the pioneers cross during their trip to the Salt Lake Valley?

A. Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming and Utah

B. Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado and Utah

C. Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado and Utah

D. Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, Wyoming and Utah

Answer
Deseret News archives

A. Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming and Utah

The pioneers began their travels westward from Nauvoo, Illinois, and their trek took them through Iowa, where they set up settlements like Winter Quarters and Kanesville (Council Bluffs). From Iowa, the pioneers set off across the plains, crossing Nebraska, Wyoming, and part of Utah on their journey to Salt Lake City.

>> A map created for Utah's pioneer centennial in 1947 tracks the route of the Mormon wagon trains of 1847, from Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters on the Missouri River to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.

Question 4
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

How many wagons made up the first wagon train to reach Utah?

A. 70

B. 96

C. 124

D. 100

>> The 1997 commemorative wagon train moves through Utah.

Answer
Deseret News Archives

A. 70

In the spring of 1847, Brigham Young led a hand-picked company out of Winter Quarters to find their new home. According to Leonard J. Arrington, the original company consisted of 148 people, 70 wagons, 93 horses, 52 mules, 66 oxen, 19 cows, 17 dogs and some chickens. The train covered 1,031 miles of trail in 111 days.

>> Cars affixed with covered wagon canvas enter into the Sugar House area of Salt Lake in July 1947. This event marked the 100th Anniversary of the pioneers entering the Salt Lake Valley.

Question 5
Ray Boren

How many women began the cross-country voyage with the first wagon train to head to the Salt Lake Valley?

A. 3

B. 45

C. 19

D. 7

>> Details on sculptor Mahonri Young's This Is the Place Monument include a scene showing pioneer leader Brigham Young, who was ill, riding in the carriage of his friend Wilford Woodruff, as they approach the Salt Lake Valley.

Answer
Utah State Historical Society

A. 3

The three women who traveled with the first pioneer company to begin the exodus to Salt Lake were Ellen S. Kimball, Harriet Page Decker Young and Clara Decker Young. Two children, Isaac and Lorenzo Young, also accompanied the train.

According to Leonard J. Arrington, Harriet, who was married to Brigham's brother Lorenzo, accompanied the train because the Missouri lowlands were not good for her health. Harriet asked for female company and Brigham agreed that Clara — Harriet's daughter by her first husband — and Heber C. Kimball's wife Ellen could also come.

>> In this 1997 file photo, pioneer trek wagons roll along near Devil's Gate, Wyo.

Question 6
LDS Church Archives

What device is William Clayton — with the help of Orson Pratt and Appleton Milo Harmon — credited with building while journeying with the first Mormon wagon train to cross the plains?

A. The modern odometer

B. The safety pin

C. The sewing machine

D. A rotary washing machine

Answer
Ray Boren

A. The modern odometer

According to a 2006 article in the Deseret News, William Clayton became frustrated about uncertain estimates of daily pioneer progress and pushed for the creation of a machine that would take accurate measurements. Brigham Young acted as manager, Parley P. Pratt acted as engineer, William Clayton acted as customer and Appleton Harmon acted as craftsman in the creation of a pioneer odometer.

>> The Iron Mission State Park in Cedar City is home to dozens of vintage wagon wheels and farm implements from the pioneer era.

Question 7
Minerva Teichert

What hymn was written during the first wagon train's journey to the Salt Lake Valley?

A. "Carry On"

B. "Brother Brigham Says"

C. "Come, Come Ye Saints"

D. "Praise to the Man"

Answer
Danquart Anton Weggeland

C. "Come, Come Ye Saints"

According to William Clayton's journal, he penned the song, which he called, "All is Well," in thanks to his Heavenly Father for the birth of his son and as a prayer that the Lord would spare his son's life and the life of his mother so they could one day meet again.

Question 8
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

What famous landmark in Wyoming is covered with the carved names of emigrants who traveled along the Oregon, Mormon and California trails?

A. Devil's Gate

B. Independence Rock

C. Devil's Tower

D. Chimney Rock

>> A pioneer signature from 1853 of "B. Snow."

Answer
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

B. Independence Rock

According to wyoshpo.state.wy.us, although Independence Rock is sometimes thought to have received its name because July 4 was the date emigrants needed to reach it by in order to reach their destinations safely, its name actually comes from a party of fur trappers who camped there on July 4, 1824. Jesuit missionary Pierre Jean De Smet called the rock the "great register of the desert" due to the many names passersby carved on its surface.

>> Wagons make their way along the side of Independence Rock, Wyoming as spectators watch from atop the rock during the 1997 Mormon Pioneer Trek.

Question 9
Hunakai, artwork by David Alan Clark

What famous mountain man did the pioneers meet in Wyoming during their journey West?

A. Etienne Provost

B. Peter Skene Ogden

C. Jim Bridger

D. John C. Fremont

Answer
Denver Public Library

C. Jim Bridger

According to historytogo.utah.gov, Jim Bridger was thought to be the first documented discoverer of the Great Salt Lake, but recent evidence suggests credit for that should actually go to fur trader Etienne Provost, the namesake of Provo.

Bridger had his first encounter with Mormon pioneers in June 1847, where he drew a map on the ground to sketch out the region for Brigham Young.

Question 10
Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

According to the diary of Willard Richards, what did Jim Bridger promise to give Brigham Young for a bushel of corn raised in the Salt Lake basin?

A. 10 oxen

B. $1,000 dollars

C. Fort Bridger

D. $3,000 dollars

Answer
Keith Johnson, Deseret News

B. $1,000 dollars

During the meeting with Jim Bridger, Wilford Woodruff wrote that Bridger was concerned it would "not be prudent to bring a great population into the basin until [they] ascertained whether grain would grow or not."

Willard Richards also wrote of the meeting, saying, "Met Capt. James Bridger . . . he said he would give $1,000 dollars for a bushel of corn raised in the basin."

>> Tracy Larson and her daughter water the garden at the Gardiner Cabin at This Is The Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City, Utah July 19, 2010.

Question 11
James Ackerman, Wikipedia

How many days did it take to travel the last 116 miles from Fort Bridger to the valley of the Great Salt Lake?

A. 7 days

B. 9 days

C. 10 days

D. 14 days

Answer
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

D. 14 days

According to the National Park Service, the last 116 miles of the trip were the toughest of all for the first company of pioneers. The people and animals were tired from their long journey, and the canyons and passes of the Wasatch Range were difficult to traverse.

>> The Mormon Wall at Fort Bridger, Wyo.

Question 12
Jeffrey D Allred, Deseret News

What were Brigham Young's first words upon seeing the Salt Lake Valley?

A. "It is good. This is the right place. Drive on."

B. "It is enough. This is the right place. Drive on."

C. "It is enough. This is the place. Drive on."

D. "It is good enough. This is the right place. Drive on."

>> The 1997 sesquicentennial wagon train enters the Salt Lake Valley in 1997.

Answer
Ray Boren

B. "It is enough. This is the right place. Drive on."

Wilford Woodruff described President Brigham Young's actions and words as he looked over the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, writing, "When we came out of the canyon into full view of the valley, I turned the side of my carriage around, open to the west, and President Young arose from his bed and took a survey of the country. While gazing on the scene before us, he was enwrapped in vision for several minutes. He had seen the valley before in vision, and upon this occasion he saw the future glory of Zion and of Israel, as they would be, planted in the valleys of these mountains. When the vision had passed, he said: 'It is enough. This is the right place. Drive on.'"

>> A close-up view of the "This Is the Place" historic marker. The obelisk features a bison, or buffalo, skull — a symbol of the Mormon Pioneer Trail — and a version of Brigham Young's memorable pronouncement upon arriving in the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847.

Question 13
Tyler Sipe

By the time Brigham Young entered the valley on July 24, what had the pioneers already done?

A. Laid out plans for the streets

B. Laid the foundation for the Tabernacle

C. Planted crops and started irrigation work

D. Started building the Lion House

Answer
Don Grayston

C. Planted crops and started irrigation work

According to Wilford Woodruff's journal, by the time Brigham Young entered the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847, the brethren who had arrived two days before had already broken ground and started planting potatoes.

William W. Slaughter and Michael Landon's book, "Trail of Hope," also says that these brethren had started diverting the waters of City Creek — which had not yet been named — for irrigation.

Question 14
Utah State Historical Society

On what day did a party of men including Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Ezra T. Benson, George A. Smith, Wilford Woodruff and others climb Ensign Peak?

A. July 26, 1847

B. July 24, 1847

C. July 30, 1847

D. August 1, 1847

>> Aerial view of Ensign Peak in September 1952.

Answer
Lynn Arave

A. July 26, 1847

According to the article "Ensign Peak: A Historical Review," President Brigham Young had been shown the Salt Lake Valley and Ensign Peak in a dream, and recognized the hill when he saw it.

On July 26, 1847, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, Ezra T. Benson, George A. Smith, Wilford Woodruff, Albert Carrington, William Clayton, Lorenzo Dow Young and perhaps Parley P. Pratt climbed to the top of the hill to look over the valley.

>> The historic plaque at the top of Ensign Peak.

Question 15
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

While historical records debate whether or not the men who climbed Ensign Peak flew an American flag from its heights, other reports say the men waved something from the hill. What did they wave?

A. A hat

B. A shawl

C. Their hands

D. A bandana

>> In this 1997 file photo, youth from the Ensign, Salt Lake , and Parleys Stakes carry the flags of the nations to the top of Ensign Peak as part of dedication program.

Answer
Deseret News Archives

D. A bandana

According to William C. A. Smoot, an early pioneer, while the men were on top of Ensign Peak, "they hoisted a sort of flag on Ensign Peak. Not a flag, but a handkerchief belonging to Heber C. Kimball, one of those yellow bandana kinds."

>> Ensign Peak.

Question 16
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

On July 28, Brigham Young planted his walking stick in the ground and said the Saints would begin building what?

A. The Tabernacle

B. The Lion House

C. The Capitol building

D. The Salt Lake Temple

>> Michael and Mary Ann Barnard (aka Brigham Young and Mary Ann Angel Young), Taylorsville, walk near Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah, Friday, April 2, 2010.

Answer
Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News

D. The Salt Lake Temple

An 1866 interview with Brigham Young stated that when he came over the mountains into the valley, he "saw in a vision of the night, an angel standing on a conical hill, pointing to a spot of ground on which the new temple must be built."

Four days after entering the valley, Brigham Young planted his walking stick on the temple site and declared, "Here we will build the temple of our God."

Question 17
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Who named City Creek?

A. Joseph F. Smith

B. Porter Rockwell

C. Brigham Young

D. Willard Richards

>> City Creek Canyon in Salt Lake City, Utah, Wednesday, June 2, 2010.

Answer
Dan Weggeland

C. Brigham Young

According to the book, "Utah Place Names: A Comprehensive Guide to the Origins of Geographic Names" by John W. Van Cott, Brigham Young gave City Creek its name on August 22, 1847, during the first general conference of the church.

Question 18
http://www.loc.gov/

Between 1846 and 1869, how many Mormons traveled West on the Mormon Trail?

A. Between 100,000 and 120,000

B. Between 80,000 and 93,000

C. Between 60,000 and 70,000

D. Between 28,000 and 30,000

>> A 1912 re-enactment of Mormon pioneers entering the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847, with covered wagons coming off Big Mountain into Mountain Dell, by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Answer
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

C. Between 60,000 and 70,000

The mass migration to Utah should be remembered for more than theological reasons, author Wallace Stegner wrote.

"These were the most systematic, organized, disciplined, and successful pioneers in our history," he said. "Where Oregon emigrants and argonauts bound for the gold fields lost practically all their social cohesion en route, the Mormons moved like the host of Israel they thought themselves. Far from loosening their social organization, the trail perfected it."

>> The 1997 commemorative wagon train is escorted through East Canyon.

Question 19
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

How many miles, on average, could a wagon train travel per day in the 1840s?

A. 25 miles

B. 20 miles

C. 15 miles

D. 9 miles

>> The 1997 commemorative wagon train heads through East Canyon.

Answer
Deseret News archives

D. 9 miles

According to William W. Slaughter and Michael Landon's book, "Trail of Hope," wagons crossed the plains moving at less than two miles per hour, and traveling 15 miles in a day was considered very good. The average mileage per day in the 1840s was nine, but by the 1860s wagon trains were averaging between 20 and 25 miles per day.

Question 20
David Koch

Roughly how many miles long was the Mormon Trail?

A. 1,500

B. 1,200

C. 1,300

D. 1,000

Answer
Ravell Call, Deseret News

C. 1,300

The Mormon Trail passed through five states, winding from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Between 60,000 and 70,000 emigrants used it to cross the plains between 1846 and 1869. Along the way, the National Parks Conservation Association website said, the pioneers built bridges, found ferry crossings and left behind markers for those who would follow.

Question 21
C.C.A. Christiensen

According to an 1859 pioneer guide, what was, "more to be dreaded upon the plains than almost any disaster that can happen"?

A. Stampede

B. Wildfire

C. Indian attack

D. Typhoid

Answer
Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News

A. Stampede

According to William W. Slaughter and Michael Landon's book, "Trail of Hope," mules, oxen and horses were easily spooked and would stampede for myriad reasons ranging from snakes to lightening. Damages from stampedes could include injuries and deaths among animals and people, ruined provisions, broken wagons and time spent dealing with the aftermath.

>> Joel Manwill and daughter Olivia admire one of the two huge oxen at this is the Place Heritage State Park Monday July 5, 2004.

Question 22
Courtesy Museum of Church History and Art

What was the name of the fund that helped immigrants migrate to Utah?

A. Perpetual Migration Fund

B. Perpetual Emigration Fund

C. The Personal Emigration Fund

D. The Mormon Migration Fund

Answer
Tyler Sipe

B. Perpetual Emigration Fund

According to historytogo.utah.gov, the Perpetual Emigration Fund was initiated in 1849 to help move Mormon refugees to Utah, but it also became a major part of gathering Latter-day Saints from abroad. It reportedly assisted 26,000 immigrants who came from Europe to the U.S. between 1852 and 1887.

Question 23
Stuart Johnson, Deseret News

The miracle of the gulls, where seagulls came in large flocks to eat the Mormon crickets that were devastating crops in the Salt Lake Valley, occurred in what year?

A. 1847

B. 1848

C. 1849

D. 1850

>> Mormon cricket

Answer
Steve Fidel, Deseret News

B. 1848

According to the Encyclopedia of Mormonism, in 1848, hordes of "Mormon crickets" the size of a man's thumb began to devour the crops, leaving fields devastated. However, in what became known as the miracle of the gulls, seagulls swooped down, ate the crickets, drank water, threw the crickets back up and then returned for more.

Wrote one pioneer, "It seems the hand of the Lord is in our favor."

>> The Seagull Monument on Temple Square was created by Mahonri M. Young, the grandson of Brigham Young, in honor of the event. The seagull is the state bird of Utah.

Question 24
Deseret News Archives

What year was the first Pioneer Day celebration held?

A. 1848

B. 1912

C. 1897

D. 1849

>> In this July 24, 1912 photo, volunteer firemen march in the Days of 47 Pioneer Parade.

Answer
R. Scott Lloyd

D. 1849

On July 24, 1849, according to a history paper written by Steven L. Olsen, the first Pioneer Day was celebrated with cannon fire, the Nauvoo Brass Band, the ringing of the Nauvoo Bell, a flag ceremony, a ward march to Temple Square where people were seated, a processional march to Brigham Young's house to escort him to the celebration, presentations of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States to "Brother Brigham," a keynote address by the prophet, songs, poems, prayers, shouts of "Hosanna" and "Amen," and a meal for the pioneers, visiting forty-niners heading to California and numerous Native Americans.

"Such a feast of the body coupled with a feast of the soul has not been experienced on this continent for a length of time," one person in attendance said.

>> Journal History of the LDS Church, July 24, 1849, the first time the festivities were recorded commemorating Pioneer Day.

Question 25
Print engraving, Deseret News archives

At the October 1856 general conference, Brigham Young asked for volunteers to go rescue almost 1,000 people on the plains. Who were these people?

A. The Donner party

B. The Willie & Martin handcart companies

C. The Ellsworth handcart company

D. The Stoddard handcart company

Answer
Greg Hill

B. The Willie & Martin handcart companies

During the move to Utah, 10 handcart companies walked between Iowa City and Salt Lake. About 250 handcart pioneers died along the way, with 220 of those who died belonging to the Willie and Martin companies, which began their journey to Utah late in the 1856 travel season.

After receiving word that the two companies were stranded in Wyoming, Brigham Young spoke at general conference, saying, "On the fifth day of October, 1856, many of our brethren and sisters are on the plains with handcarts, and probably many are now 700 miles from this place, and they must be brought here, we must send assistance to them . . . That is my religion; that is the dictation of the Holy Ghost that I possess, it is to save the people . . . This is the salvation I am now seeking for, to save our brethren that would be apt to perish, or suffer extremely, if we do not send them assistance."

Rescuers were sent, and the Willie company arrived in Salt Lake on November 9, with the Martin company following on November 30.

>> Martin's Cove, Wyoming.

Question 26
Utah State Historical Society

The men running down-and-back wagon trains, which carried goods from Salt Lake to the Midwest and then carried migrants back across the plains to the Valley, were called what?

A. Boys

B. Utah boys

C. American boys

D. All of the above

>> Pioneers at the mouth of Echo Canyon, in the 1860s.

Answer
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

D. All of the above

In 1860, Brigham Young expressed a desire to have church-sponsored wagon trains that could travel back East, drop off salable supplies when they reached their destination, pick up Mormon travelers and then return to Utah. The plan moved forward in 1861.

According to William W. Slaughter and Michael Landon's book, "Trail of Hope," each train captain had a crew consisting of at least one teamster per wagon, an assistant captain, a chaplain, a quartermaster, a hospital steward, a camp guard and a night guard for the stock. These men were called "boys," "Utah boys," "Mormon boys," or "American boys."

>> In this 1997 file photo, the commemorative wagon train makes its way through the fog in Nebraska on the first week of the trek.

Question 27
Deseret News archives

The Latter-day Saint pioneers worked to make the desert blossom like a what?

A. A flower

B. A sego lily

C. A daisy

D. A rose

>> Main Street about 1870, looking north from 200 South. The old Walker Bank is on the corner at left. In the distance is the Arsenal on the hill on the site now occupied by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Building.

Answer
Johanna Workman

D. A rose

After having endured mob violence and multiple moves over the course of many years, for the pioneers, the Salt Lake Valley became a fulfillment of the scripture verse Isaiah 35:1, which says:

"The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose."

Question 28
Brian Nicholson, Deseret News

Counting Brigham Young, how many prophets or future prophets crossed the plains?

A. 7

B. 6

C. 5

D. 4

>> Brigham Young's grave located at Pioneer Memorial park at 140 E. First Avenue in Salt Lake City.

Answer
Ray Boren

C. 5

Brigham Young, John Taylor, Wilford Woodruff, Lorenzo Snow and Joseph F. Smith all crossed the plains. Heber J. Grant, the seventh president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was born in Salt Lake City in 1856.

>> Perched atop the central pillar of This Is the Place Monument, with an excellent view of the Salt Lake Valley, are statues of pioneer leaders Brigham Young (center), Heber C. Kimball (left) and Wilford Woodruff.

Question 29
Charles William Carter

What nickname did Brigham Young receive for his work leading the exodus of the Latter-day Saints?

A. The American Moses

B. Brother Brigham

C. The Lion of the Lord

D. The Great Western Colonizer

Answer
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

A. The American Moses

According to LDS.org, in his lifetime, "Brigham Young supervised the trek of between 60,000 to 70,000 pioneers to the Salt Lake Valley; founded 400 settlements; established a system of land distribution later ratified by Congress; served two terms as the first territorial governor of Utah, as first superintendent of Indian Affairs of Utah Territory, and as church president for 30 years."

Glen Leonard's 1980 article "Westward the Saints: The Nineteenth-Century Mormon Migration," said historians have called the migration "one of history's best-organized mass movements, a model of discipline, organization, orderliness and cooperation."

Question 30
Utah State Historical Society

Mormons were cast as the villains in a number of early Hollywood films, but what 1940s Hollywood film earned the praise of President Heber J. Grant and later saw its one of its stars baptized into the LDS Church?

A. "Pioneers of the West"

B. "Prairie Pioneers"

C. "The Utah Kid"

D. "Brigham Young"

>> Stars of one of the films listed above hold a press conference at the Salt Lake airport before the Utah premiere of the movie.

Answer
Stuart Johnson, Deseret News

D. "Brigham Young"

In the late 1930s, filmmaker Darryl F. Zanuck began looking into making a film about Brigham Young. Wary of previous film portrayals of Mormons, President Heber J. Grant offered church resources to aid with research and attended a private showing with J. Reuben Clark and David O. McKay. The film premiered on August 23, 1940 — dubbed "Brigham Young Day" — in Salt Lake City.

The film starred Tyrone Power as a young Mormon, Linda Darnell as "The Outsider," Mary Astor as Mary Ann Young, Vincent Price as Joseph Smith and Dean Jagger as Brigham Young. Mormon Moroni Olsen, who voiced the magic mirror in Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," was also in the movie.

Dean Jagger, who married a member of the LDS Church in 1968, was baptized in 1972.

>> People look at film memorabilia in the lobby of the Harold B. Lee Library at BYU after watching a screening of the 20th Century Fox movie "Brigham Young." The movie was originally released in 1940.