Time magazine
16 Time magazine explores 'The Mormon in Mitt'
Time magazine

The Oct. 8, 2012, cover of Time magazine features Mitt Romney and "The Mormon Identity."

The cover article explores Romney's Latter-day Saint roots and looks at how his beliefs could influence his presidential policies.

Click here to learn more about "The Mormon in Mitt."

15 Newsweek's newest Mormon package
Courtesy of Newsweek

Newsweek released a package on Mormons this week. The feature story can be found here.

14 Glenn Beck, Mormon media mogul
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Glenn Beck is the only Mormon who is not a General Authority of the church or a politician to be individually featured on the cover of Time Magazine. In a relatively short time, Beck has become something of a media mogul. After recently leaving Fox, Beck’s future has been the source of much rumor and speculation. Beck’s fascinating life is outlined here.

13 Arthur Vivian Watkins
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Arthur Vivian Watkins: Watkins born in Midway, Utah attended Brigham Young University, New York University, and Columbia University Law School. He was elected to the Senate in 1946 and served until 1959. He was featured on Time Magazine for chairing the Watkins Committee, which was set up in 1954 to interrogate Joseph McCarthy. The committee ultimately recommended a censor of the Wisconsin Senator. Watkins also served as an LDS stake president for 16 years.

12 George Romney, American Mormon business man
Courtesy of Time Magazine

George Romney, Mitt’s father, made quite a name for himself after salvaging American Motors Corporation. In 1962, after much fasting and prayer, Romney decided to resign from his position as the CEO of American Motors and run for governor of Michigan. After a convincing victory, Romney was subsequently reelected in both ’64 and ’66. In 1967, Romney announced his run for the ‘68 Republican presidential nomination. After losing to Richard Nixon, he served under Nixon as the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

11 George Romney, Republican candidate
Courtesy of Time Magazine

George Romney, Mitt’s father, made quite a name for himself after salvaging American Motors Corporation. In 1962, after much fasting and prayer, Romney decided to resign from his position as the CEO of American Motors and run for governor of Michigan. After a convincing victory, Romney was subsequently reelected in both ’64 and ’66. In 1967, Romney announced his run for the ‘68 Republican presidential nomination. After losing to Richard Nixon, he served under Nixon as the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

10 Mitt Romney, Mormon presidential candidate (Newsweek)
Courtesy of Newsweek

Like father, like son. Mitt Romney, also made quite a name for himself by turning around companies. His investment firm, Bain Capital, helped restructure companies like Staples, Domino’s Pizza, Brookstone and The Sports Authority. Romney also led the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics and was subsequently elected governor of Massachusetts. After running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008, he has positioned himself as the frontrunner for the 2012 GOP nomination.

9 Mitt Romney, Mormon presidential candidate (Time)
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Like father, like son. Mitt Romney, also made quite a name for himself by turning around companies. His investment firm, Bain Capital, helped restructure companies like Staples, Domino’s Pizza, Brookstone and The Sports Authority. Romney also led the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics and was subsequently elected governor of Massachusetts. After running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008, he has positioned himself as the frontrunner for the 2012 GOP nomination.

8 The Mormons and the Olympics
Courtesy of Newsweek

Published the Day before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, this cover story on the Mormons was written in anticipation of the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. The white-shirt/black-pants motif on the cover probably caused people to unwittingly confuse the LDS with restaurant waiters and waitresses.

7 The Salt Lake City temple
Courtesy of Time Magazine

The Salt Lake City temple has long been an iconic symbol of Mormonism. Purportedly 20 cubits taller than Solomon’s temple, its structure evokes Mormonism’s connection with both ancient and 19th century history. The sacred ordinances performed in LDS temples allow members to make individual covenants.

6 Heber J. Grant, Mormon prophet
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Heber J. Grant, the seventh prophet of the LDS Church, was known as an excellent businessman and religious leader. As prophet, Heber J. Grant once received a gift of 1,000 silver dollars to donate to the church’s children’s hospital — instead of simply donating the money, he made paper-weights out of the coins and then sent them to wealthy friends, soliciting donations. From the initial $1,000 he raised an estimated $80,000 for the hospital.

5 Reed Smoot, First Mormon senator
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Reed Smoot was a Mormon apostle and the first Mormon to become a U.S. senator. Smoot’s election caused a long debate over whether the Mormon apostle was eligible to be seated in the U.S. Senate. The Reed Smoot hearings lasted three years and according to historian Kathleen Flake caused so many public petitions that they fill 11 feet of shelf space in the National archives. After a 1907 vote in the Senate, Smoot was seated and served for more than 25 years.

4 Ezra Taft Benson, Secretary of Agriculture
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Ezra Taft Benson was serving as both an apostle for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Secretary of Agriculture under President Dwight D. Eisenhower when this was published. Benson was one of the few members of the Eisenhower cabinet who lasted all eight years. When he became the prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he was known for the emphasis he placed on flooding the world with the Book of Mormon.

3 Ezra Taft Benson, Secretary of Agriculture
Courtesy of Time Magazine

Ezra Taft Benson was serving as both an apostle for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Secretary of Agriculture under President Dwight D. Eisenhower when this was published. Benson was one of the few members of the Eisenhower cabinet who lasted all eight years. When he became the prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he was known for the emphasis he placed on flooding the world with the Book of Mormon.

2 George Albert Smith, for the LDS centennial celebration
Courtesy of Time Magazine

George Albert Smith, the eighth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was featured on the cover of Time in conjunction with the church’s centennial celebration. Though the cover art features gold dollar signs on the beats and a myriad of Golden plates in the background (apparently drawing attention to the Church’s financial health), the cover’s emphasis on the church’s living prophet, pioneer history, Temple and Book of Mormon highlighted key aspects of the Mormon religion.

1 The First Vision
Courtesy of Newsweek

This beautiful magazine cover hearkens back to before the founding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when the 14-year-old Joseph Smith beheld his first vision. After retiring to a secluded wood in Palmyra, N.Y., Joseph Smith prayed to know which of the church he should join. Subsequently, Joseph said he saw God the Father and Jesus Christ. This stain-glass rendering of Joseph’s vision is housed in the Church History and Art Museum in Salt Lake City.

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