Associated Press

In a report released Tuesday, Public Policy Polling looked at conspiracy theories on issues ranging from the JFK assassination to UFOs, contrails, President Barack Obama as the anti-Christ and fluoride.

According to PPP's partisan breakdown of the organization's poll data, Mitt Romney voters and President Barack Obama voters differ on items like the Iraq war and global warming, but things like Osama bin Laden's death find a more bipartisan consensus.

"Even crazy conspiracy theories are subject to partisan polarization, especially when there are political overtones involved," PPP president Dean Debnam said. "But most Americans reject the wackier ideas out there about fake moon landings and shape-shifting lizards."

Here's a look at 15 of the questions PPP asked in its poll, and some of the results the questions led to.

Paul is dead
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe Paul McCartney actually died in a car crash in 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike so The Beatles could continue, or not?

Results:
Do: 5 percent
Do not: 80 percent
Not sure: 14 percent

The walrus may have been Paul McCartney, but according to PPP respondents, the famous musician is probably not dead. Only 4 percent of Obama voters and 5 percent of Romney voters believe Paul McCartney was killed and replaced.

>> A visitor passes an oversized cover of "Abbey Road" during the opening of the "Beatles Museum" in Hamburg, Germany on Thursday, May 28, 2009.

Global warming
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe global warming is a hoax, or not?

Results:
Do: 37 percent
Do not: 51 percent
Not sure: 12 percent

According to the poll, 61 percent of those who voted for Mitt Romney said they believe global warming is a hoax, and 77 percent of those who voted for President Obama said they do not believe it is a hoax.

>> In this Thursday, April 29, 2010 file photo, a pair of coal trains idle on the tracks near Dry Fork Station, a coal-fired power plant being built by the Basin Electric Power Cooperative near Gillette, Wyo.

Osama bin Laden's death
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe Osama bin Laden is still alive, or not?

Results:
Do: 6 percent
Do not: 83 percent
Not sure: 11 percent

Both Obama and Romney voters are largely convinced that Osama bin Laden is dead, with only 4 percent of Obama voters and 6 percent of Romney voters saying they believe he is still alive.

>> This is an undated file photo shows al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, in Afghanistan.

The moon landing
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe the moon landing was faked, or not?

Results:
Do: 7 percent
Do not: 84 percent
Not sure: 9 percent

The debate over the moon landing has been around since 1969, but in that time, the conspiracy has failed to convince many people of its validity. According to PPP, 6 percent of Obama voters and 5 percent of Romney voters believe the landing was a hoax; 81 percent of Obama voters and 88 percent of Romney voters believe U.S. astronauts really landed on the moon.

>> In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descends steps of Lunar Module ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon. He had just egressed the Lunar Module.

UFO crash in Roswell
Associated Press/Air Force

Question: Do you believe a UFO crashed at Roswell, N.M., in 1947, and the US government covered it up, or not?

Results:
Do: 21 percent
Do not: 47 percent
Not sure: 32 percent

Sixteen percent of Obama voters and 27 percent of Romney voters believe a UFO crashed at Roswell, according to the poll results. Poll respondents who said they were "not sure" came in almost equally, at 33 percent and 32 percent respectively.

>> This is a photo from the Air Force's "The Roswell Report," released Tuesday, June 24, 1997 about the UFO incident at Roswell, N.M. in 1947. Air Force personnel used stretchers and gurneys to pick up 200-pound dummies in the field and moved them to the laboratory. The 231-page report, released on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Roswell, N.M., UFO incident, is meant to close the book on longstanding rumors that the Air Force recovered a flying saucer and extraterrestrial bodies near Roswell.

New World Order
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe that a secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian world government, or New World Order, or not?

Results:
Do: 28 percent
Do not: 46 percent
Not sure: 25 percent

Belief in a possible New World Order was split among Romney voters, with 38 percent believing it was possible, 35 percent disagreeing, and 27 percent saying they were not sure. Obama voters were more in agreement, with 61 percent saying they did not believe in a New World Order conspiracy, 16 percent saying they did, and 23 percent saying they were not sure.

>> In this Sept. 13, 2005 file photo, the flags of member nations fly outside the General Assembly building at the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Obama as the anti-Christ
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe President Barack Obama is the anti-Christ, or not?

Results:
Do: 13 percent
Do not: 73 percent
Not sure: 13 percent

President Obama as the anti-Christ? Fifty-nine percent of Romney voters say no, while 22 percent of Romney voters — and 5 percent of Obama voters — say they believe he is, according to the PPP poll.

>> President Barack Obama speaks to reporters in the White House briefing room in Washington, Friday, March 1, 2013, following his meeting with congressional leaders regarding the automatic spending cuts.

WMDs in Iraq
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe the Bush administration intentionally misled the public about the possibility of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq to promote the Iraq war, or not?

Results:
Do: 44 percent
Do not: 45 percent
Not sure: 12 percent

According to the poll results, 69 percent of Obama voters believe President George W. Bush misled Americans about Iraq's possession of weapons of mass destruction, while only 18 percent of Romney voters agree.

>> A U.S. marine watches a statue of Saddam Hussein being toppled in Firdaus Square, in downtown Bagdhad in this April 9, 2003 file photo.

Space: The final frontier
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe aliens exist, or not?

Results:
Do: 29 percent
Do not: 47 percent
Not sure: 24 percent

The percentage of Obama and Romney voters who believe aliens exist is tied at 28 percent, while more Romney voters than Obama voters believe aliens don't exist, 52 to 41 percent.

>> Aliens pose in front of Traditions on Main Street in downtown Roswell, N.M., Thursday, July 3, 2008 during the Roswell UFO Festival.

Ruled by lizard people
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe that shape-shifting reptilian people control our world by taking on human form and gaining political power to manipulate our societies, or not?

Results:
Do: 4 percent
Do not: 88 percent
Not sure: 7 percent

PPP was hard-pressed to find voters who believe lizard people are taking over the world, the poll results show, with 2 percent of Obama voters and 5 percent of Romney voters believing it was a possibility.

>> The TV show "V" is a re-imagining of the 1980s miniseries about the world's first encounter with an alien race in which the aliens are reptiles in human form.

9/11 truthers
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe the U.S. government knowingly allowed the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, to happen, or not?

Results:
Do: 11 percent
Do not: 78 percent
Not sure: 11 percent

9/11 truthers were in short supply among poll respondents, but Obama voters were more likely to say it was possible the government allowed 9/11 to happen or that they were unsure about the issue. According to the PPP poll, 13 percent of Obama voters said the government allowed 9/11, and 16 percent said they were unsure, compared to 8 percent and 7 percent of Romney voters.

>> 9/11 conspiracy theorist demonstrate outside the anniversary ceremony of the attacks on the World Trade Center, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009 in New York.

Airplanes and chemtrails
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe that the exhaust seen in the sky behind airplanes is actually chemicals sprayed by the government for sinister reasons, or not?

Results:
Do: 5 percent
Do not: 87 percent
Not sure: 8 percent

The chemtrail conspiracy theory may not have a wide audience, according to the PPP poll, with only 3 percent of Obama voters and 5 percent of Romney voters saying they agree that the government spreads chemicals through airplane exhaust. Ten percent of Obama voters and 5 percent of Romney voters said they were not sure.

>> Seagulls fly past as sun highlights airplane trails in the sky at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in London, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013.

The JFK assassination
Tom Dillard/Dallas Morning News/Corbis

Question: Do you believe that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in killing President Kennedy, or was there some larger conspiracy at work?

Results:
Acted alone: 25 percent
Larger conspiracy: 51 percent
Not sure: 24 percent

The 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy sparked conspiracy theories that have persisted to the present day, with voters split over whether or not Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. According to the PPP results, 47 percent of Obama voters and 54 percent of Romney voters believe there was a larger conspiracy at work in JFK's death.

>> On November 22, 1963, Lee Harvey Oswald was apprehended by the Dallas Police Department inside Texas Theater, nearby Dallas' Dealey Plaza, where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated earlier that day.

Inventing diseases
Shutterstock

Question: Do you believe the pharmaceutical industry is in league with the medical industry to "invent" new diseases in order to make money, or not?

Results:
Do: 15 percent
Do not: 69 percent
Not sure: 16 percent

Disease as a money-making enterprise? Eleven percent of Obama voters and 17 percent of Romney voters say they believe it's a possibility.

The CIA and cocaine
Associated Press

Question: Do you believe the CIA was instrumental in distributing crack cocaine into America's inner cities in the 1980s, or not?

Results:
Do: 14 percent
Do not: 55 percent
Not sure: 30 percent

Ten percent of Romney voters believe the CIA spread cocaine to inner cities, while 17 percent of Obama voters agree, PPP reported. Thirty-two percent of Obama voters and 28 percent of Romney voters said they were not sure.

>> A figure portraying the Grim Reaper marches in protest of alleged CIA involvement in the crack cocaine trade near Los Angeles City Hall, rear, Saturday, Feb. 22, 1997.