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Congress is home to 435 Representatives and 100 Senators, which — when mixed with thousands of bills, hundreds of hearings and myriad markup sessions — can raise questions about one person's ability to influence change in Washington, D.C.

Within the House and Senate, though, individuals stand to gain more influence through the committee system.

According to the Senate website, the Senate divides its tasks among 20 committees, 68 subcommittees and 4 joint committees. Each party assigns its own members to committees, and each committee distributes its members among subcommittees.

In the House, there are 20 current standing committees with a plethora of subcommittees. Members express a preference for assignment on specific committees, and a committee on committees then tries to match preferences with committee slots.

Utah's four representatives and two senators represent the state on more than 45 combined committees and subcommittees.

Here's a look at where Utah's leaders are in Washington and what policy areas they have the power to influence.

Sen. Orrin Hatch: Committee on Finance
Associated Press

In terms of Senate seniority, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, is second only to Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., who took office two years before Hatch. Hatch began his work in the Senate on Jan. 3, 1977, and now serves as ranking member of the Senate Committee on Finance. Seniority provides senators with preferential treatment in matters such as committee assignments, which was a point used during Hatch's reelection efforts.

Among other things, the Senate Finance Committee is concerned with matters related to taxation and other revenue measures, bonded debt of the United States, reciprocal trade agreements, transportation of dutiable goods, general revenue sharing and health programs including Medicare, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and national social security.

Hatch also serves on the Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastrucuture; the Subcomittee on Fiscal Responsibility and Economic Growth; the Subcommittee on Health Care; the Subcommittee on International Trade, Customs, and Global Competitiveness; the Subcommittee on Social Security, Pensions and Family Policy and the Subcommittee on Taxation and IRS Oversight.

>> Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 12, 2011, during the committee's hearing with as oil company executives.

Sen. Orrin Hatch: Committee on the Judiciary
Associated Press

Sen. Orrin Hatch is a former chairman of the Ed Whelan credited Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell with allowing Sen. Mike Lee onto the Judiciary Committee in 2011 despite a Republican Conference rule barring two Republicans from the same state from serving on the same committee.

"That rule exists for understandable reasons — among other things, there's a lot of potential for conflict and infighting if two senators from the same state are on the same committee," Whelan wrote. But Lee's background as a former law clerk to Justice Samuel Alito, as well as his age and potential to shape the committee for decades to come, led McConnell and Hatch to push for the waiver.

The Committee on the Judiciary dates back to 1816, when it was established as one of the original standing committees in the United States Senate. The committee website lists it as "one of the most influential committees in Congress." It is responsible for considering executive and judicial nominations, as well as holding hearings to conduct oversight, considering legislative proposals and considering pending business. Thus far in the 113th Congress, the committee has held hearings on gun violence and judicial nominations.

Lee is the ranking member on the Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights, and is also a member of the Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism and the Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law.

>> Senate Judiciary Committee members Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, left, and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, listen to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011">Senate Judiciary Committee, and is currently among eight Republicans on the committee, including fellow Utahn Mike Lee.

Ed Whelan credited Hatch and Republican leader Mitch McConnell with allowing Lee onto the Judiciary Committee in 2011 despite a Republican Conference rule barring two Republicans from the same state from serving on the same committee.

"I'm reliabily informed that Hatch not only gave his own consent to the waiver of the rule but that he also worked hard to persuade his fellow Republicans to do likewise," Whelan wrote. "McConnell also made the matter a real priority."

Hatch also serves on the Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and Border Security; the Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law and the Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights. He is the ranking member of the Subcommmittee on Oversight, Federal Rights and Agency Action.

>> Vice President Joe Biden administers the Senate Oath to Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah during a mock swearing in ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, as the 113th Congress officially began.

Sen. Orrin Hatch: Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
Associated Press

The Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee began in 1869 as the Committee of Education. Today, the committee oversees measures relating to education, labor, health and public welfare, aging, arts and humanities, child labor, equal employment opportunity, public health, private pension plans, student loans and wages and hours of labor, among other things.

Hatch is also a member of the Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace Safety and the Subcommitte on Primary Health and Aging.

>> Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, joined by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., left, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill Monday, March 14, 2011, at the Capitol in Washington.

Sen. Mike Lee: Committee on Armed Services
Associated Press

Sen. Mike Lee joined the Senate Committee on Armed Services for the 113th Congress, while keeping three other committee assignments. Chairman Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Ranking Member James Inhofe, R-Okla., currently lead the committee, which was established in 1816.

The committee is responsible for overseeing the nation's common defense, and its jurisdiction covers aeronautical and space activities tied to the development of weapons systems or military operations, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, military research and development, national security aspects of nuclear energy, and pay, promotion, retirement and other benefits and privileges of members of the Armed Forces, among other things.

"Utah maintains two important military installations in Hill Air Force Base and Tooele Army Depot, which are both critical to America's defense," Lee said in a news release. "As a member of the Armed Services Committee, I will make sure Utah has a seat at the table as the Pentagon continues to strengthen and modernize our national defense."

>> Senate Armed Services Committee member Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, questions former Nebraska Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel, President Obama's choice to lead the Pentagon, during his confirmation hearing before the committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013.

Sen. Mike Lee: Committee on the Judiciary
Associated Press

Ed Whelan credited Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell with allowing Sen. Mike Lee onto the Judiciary Committee in 2011 despite a Republican Conference rule barring two Republicans from the same state from serving on the same committee.

"That rule exists for understandable reasons — among other things, there's a lot of potential for conflict and infighting if two senators from the same state are on the same committee," Whelan wrote. But Lee's background as a former law clerk to Justice Samuel Alito, as well as his age and potential to shape the committee for decades to come, led McConnell and Hatch to push for the waiver.

The Committee on the Judiciary dates back to 1816, when it was established as one of the original standing committees in the United States Senate. The committee website lists it as "one of the most influential committees in Congress." It is responsible for considering executive and judicial nominations, as well as holding hearings to conduct oversight, considering legislative proposals and considering pending business. Thus far in the 113th Congress, the committee has held hearings on gun violence and judicial nominations.

Lee is the ranking member on the Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights, and is also a member of the Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism and the Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law.

>> Senate Judiciary Committee members Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, left, and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, listen to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011

Sen. Mike Lee: Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
Associated Press

Sen. Mike Lee joined the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, currently led by Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Ranking Member Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, in 2011.

Serving on the Energy and Natural Resources committee has been of particular interest to Lee, a 2011 news release said, because it enables him to focus on freeing up federal lands for economic uses, encouraging economic growth, working toward energy independence, creating greater certainty for regulations and bringing the land under more local control.

Jurisdiction for the committee includes oversight and legislative responsiblities for the Natural Energy Policy, including international energy affairs and emergency preparedness, nuclear waste policy, privatization of federal assets and territorial policy.

Lee is also a member of the Subcommittee on Energy and the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests, and is the ranking member on the Subcommittee on Water and Power.

>> Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2011.

Sen. Mike Lee: Joint Economic Committee
Associated Press

The Joint Economic Committee is a bicameral congressional committee composed of 10 members from the House and 10 from the Senate, with Democrats and Republicans splitting the committee evenly.

The committee was established by the Employment Act of 1946 and its purpose is to study matters relating to the U.S. economy, while also holding hearings, performing research and advising other members of Congress.

Other joint committees include the Joint Committee on the Library, the Joint Committee on Printing and the Joint Committee on Taxation.

>> Vice President Joe Biden administers a ceremonial Senate oath during a mock swearing-in ceremony to Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, left, accompanied by his wife Sharon, Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011, in the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Rep. Rob Bishop: Committee on Rules
Associated Press

The Committee on Rules was formally constituted in 1789 and has two broad categories of jurisdiction: special orders for the consideration of legislation, which provides the terms and conditions of debate on a measure or matter, and original jurisdiction matters, which commonly represent changes to the standing rules of the House or measures that contain special rules.

Bishop's website describes the committee as "powerful," and indeed it is, with the website stating that as long as the majority of the House is willing to vote for a special rule, there is little that the Rules Committee cannot do.

>> Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, right, talks with a photographer, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010, during a photo opportunity.

Rep. Rob Bishop: Committee on Natural Resources
Associated Press

The House Committee on Natural Resources considers legislation about things like energy production, mineral lands and mining, fisheries and wildlife, public lands, oceans, irrigation and reclamation, all of which combine to make it "one of the most important committees" to Utah, according to Bishop's House website.

Bishop is a member of the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources and is the chairman of the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation.

According to Bishop's website, he is currently on leave from the House Armed Services Committee in order to serve on the House Rules Committee, the Committee on Natural Resources and his two subcommittees. This is due to a limit placed on the number of committees for which one member may serve.

>> Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, right, accompanied by Rep. Greg Walden. R-Ore., gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010.

Rep. Jim Matheson: Energy and Commerce Committee
Associated Press

The Committee on Energy and Commerce is the oldest standing legislative committee in the U.S. House of Representatives — formed in 1795 — and is tasked with responsibility for America's telecommunications, consumer protection, food and drug safety, public health research, environmental quality, energy policy and interstate and foreign commerce. The committee also oversees departments and agencies like the Departments of Energy, Health and Human Services, Commerce and Transportation, as well as the Enviromental Protection Agency, the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission.

Matheson's House website describes it as "an exclusive committee with the broadest jurisdiction of any Congressional committee."

Matheson is also a member of the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade; the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology and the Subcommittee on Health.

>> In this Nov. 4, 2008 file photo Rep. Jim Matheson, D-Utah, rallies supporters, in Salt Lake City.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz: Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
Associated Press

The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, led by Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and Ranking Member Elijah Cummings, D-Md., operates under two fundmental principles, according to the committee website. The first is that Americans have a right to know the money Washington collects from them is well spent, and the second is that Americans deserve "an efficient, effective government that works for them."

The committee has oversight of "virtually everything government does," from national security to homeland security grants, federal workforce policies, regulatory reform and government-wide data security standards.

Chaffetz is also a member of the Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care, and Entitlements, and is chairman of the Subcommittee on National Security.

>> Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, center, debates Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., as the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee considers a vote to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 20, 2012.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz: Committee on the Judiciary
Associated Press

The Committee on the Judiciary, established in 1813, works to protect Constitutional freedoms and civil liberties, conducts oversight of the U.S. Departments of Justice and Homeland Security, and tackles issues ranging from legal and regulatory reform to competition and anti-trust laws, terrorism, crime and immigration reform.

According to Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., the House Judiciary Committee usually sends the greatest number of "substantive bills" to the House floor each year.

Chaffetz is also a member of the Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet and the Subcommitee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations.

>> Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, right, leaves a closed-door GOP strategy meeting with Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, in Washington, Monday, Dec. 31, 2012

Rep. Jason Chaffetz: Committee on Homeland Security
Associated Press

The Committee on Homeland Security was created in 2002 to provide Congressional oversight for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and to help protect Americans from possible terrorist attacks.

Recent committee hearings include topics like terrorist exploitation of refugee programs, threats to the nation's borders and WMD terrorism threats in the United States.

Chaffetz is also a member of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.

>> Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, right, joined by his wife Julie, center, stands for a ceremonial photo with Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, left, in the Rayburn Room of the Capitol after the new 113th Congress convened on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, in Washington.

Rep. Chris Stewart: Committee on Natural Resources
Associated Press

Newcomer Chris Stewart joined Rep. Rob Bishop on the House Committee on Natural Resources in January. The position covers the committee responsibilities of considering legislation about energy production, mineral lands and mining, fisheries and wildlife, public lands, oceans, irrigation, reclamation and others.

Stewart is also a member of the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation, which is chaired by Bishop, and a member of the Subcommitee on Water and Power.

"Utah's Second District has been blessed with an abudance of natural resources," Stewart said in a news release upon accepting the subcommittee assignments. "I look forward to playing an active role on both of these subcommittees, whose work has such dramatic impact on my constituents."

He also said he believes that together, he and Bishop have the ability to "continue to help protect Utah’s land.”

>> House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio performs a mock swearing in for Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington as the 113th Congress began.

Rep. Chris Stewart: Committee on Science, Space and Technology
Allison Barker

Rep. Chris Stewart was assigned to the Committee on Science, Space and Technology at the beginning of January, joining a committee that can trace its roots back to the post-Sputnik "space race" era.

The committee has jurisdiction over all energy research, development and demonstration, as well as things like astronautical research and development, civil aviation research and development, and environmental research and development. Its jurisdiction also covers the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the National Weather Service and — according to its website — outer space.

Stewart is a member of the Subcommittee on the Environment as well as the Subcommittee on Space.

According to a news release, Stewart was named the vice-chairman of the Subcommmitee on the Environment, and said that Chairman Andy Harris, R-Md., has indicated that overseeing the Environmental Protection Agency will be a priority during this session.

>> Congressman Chris Stewart, facing camera, is greeted in his office after being sworn in.