Courtesy of Provo MTC
9 St. Francis Catholic School
Courtesy of Provo MTC

To help alleviate the LTM’s overcrowding of the early ‘70s, the St. Francis School was rented at times from the Catholic Church and used both as a residence hall and a classroom facility. Missionaries learning Asian languages lived in the St. Francis School on Provo’s 900 East.

8 'Provo Hilton'
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Elders who stayed in the gym called it the 'Provo Hilton."

7 BYU Men's Gym
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Alsoduring the early 1970s, the old Men’s Gym was also used as living quarters for missionaries. The gym was located in the Training Building of the old Brigham Young Academy campus, on University Avenue between 500 North and 600 North.

6 BYU Women's Gym
Courtesy of Provo MTC

At times during the early 1970s, missionaries were asked to live in some unlikely places — one being the old BYU Women’s Gym, located across University Avenue from the old Brigham Young Academy.

5 Amanda Knight Hall
Courtesy of Provo MTC

"The Amanda Knight Hall, a Brigham Young University dormitory, was assigned to the Language Training Mission in July of 1964. It served as a residence hall and classroom primarily for German9speaking missionaries until August 1976." ? This is the caption information found on the frame plaque accompany this photo, one nearly dozen historical photos showing the development of the Language Training Mission and Missionary Training Center facilities in Provo since the 1960s. (Submission date: 03/10/2011)

4 The Knight-Mangum Hall
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Previously serving as a women’s dormitory, the Knight-Mangum Hall on the southeast edge of BYU’s campus became the central office for what became known as the Language Training Mission on June 16, 1963. All missionaries learning a foreign language were sent to the LTM, with similar facilities eventually established at Ricks College (for Dutch and Scandinavian languages) and at the Church College of Hawaii (for Polynesian and Asian languages). Through August 1976, the Knight-Mangum Hall served as a place for missionaries to live, eat, learn and worship.

3 Allen Hall
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Acquired by the Missionary Language Institute in June 1962, the Allen Hall became as a missionary residence, thanks to its proximity to the campus and having its own cafeteria. Allen Hall was used mostly for Portuguese-speaking missionaries until 1976.

2 Roberts Hotel
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Because of the quick decision to start the Missionary Language Institute, there was not enough time to arrange for space in the already occupied housing on the BYU campus. The Roberts Hotel in downtown Provo served as the first residence for all missionaries. Although housing located closer to campus was arranged within six months, missionaries still stayed in the hotel off and on during the 1960s when space elsewhere wasn’t available. At times, missionaries occupied the entire top floor.

1 BYU Alumni House
Courtesy of Provo MTC

Delays in Mexico-bound missionaries obtaining entrance permits prompted the LDS Church to develop its Missionary Language Institute at Brigham Young University in 1961. In December of that year, the group of 30 missionaries — some going to Mexico, others to Argentina — traveled from the Salt Lake Mission Home to become the first class to attend the institute. The BYU Alumni House provided classroom and office space for missionary training until June 1963.

Historic MTC