As Republican Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama speed through the final week of campaigning before the Nov. 6 election, both candidates are piling up endorsements from newspapers across the country. According to Editor & Publisher, more than 80 newspapers had endorsed Obama as of Oct. 19. Romney's endorsements stand at more than 110, but Obama is winning the circulation battle, with his combined endorsements topping 9 million in circulation as opposed to Romney's 4.9 million. The Deseret News, as a matter of policy, does not endorse political candidates. Whether or not newspaper endorsements matter to voters in the end, the endorsements and the reasoning behind them can provide a snapshot of the feelings on the ground across the United States in the days before the election. Here's a look at some endorsements from newspapers in battleground states, as well as national papers.

The Denver Post, Colorado
Associated Press

Circulation: 401,120

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Four years after The Denver Post endorsed Obama in 2008, the paper again endorsed him, saying the Iraq war is over, the war in Afghanistan has a conclusion in sight, and the economy has made demonstrable — "though hardly remarkable" — progress.

"Though there is much in Mitt Romney's resume to suggest he is a capable problem-solver, the Republican nominee has not presented himself as a leader who will bring his party closer to the center at a time when that is what this country needs," the endorsement said.

"Obama, on the other hand, has shown throughout his term that he is a steady leader who keeps the interests of a broad array of Americans in mind."

>> President Barack Obama waves as he arrives to speak at a campaign rally at City Park on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, in Denver.

Colorado Springs Gazette, Colorado
Associated Press

Circulation: 70,021

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: Romney

In a meeting with The Gazette's editorial board, Romney laid out his plan for America, and the editorial board later endorsed him. The president turned down a meeting with the editorial board.

"(Romney) projects passion for prosperity, freedom and a military so strong that no force on earth would stand a chance of harming us," the endorsement said. "It is with great enthusiasm that we encourage Americans to vote for Mitt Romney, who may be exactly the person we need for a renewed focus on life, liberty and private pursuits of happiness."

"We must choose between two men with vastly different visions. President Obama sees a country forged by the force of central government. Gov. Romney sees a country with governance that protects life, liberty and individual pursuits of happiness. Obama's vision won't work. Romney's will, and we believe he will make an extraordinary president."

>> Mitt Romney is immortalized in a 3 feet by 4 feet portrait made entirely of more than 2,000 Cheetos cheese snacks by Colorado Springs, Colo. artist, Jason Baalman Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012.

Tampa Bay Times, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 299,497

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

"Four years ago, Barack Obama offered an inspiring message of hope and change to an uneasy nation bogged down in two wars and facing economic collapse," the endorsement said. "The rosy idealism quickly gave way to the harsh realities of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. The recovery has proven more difficult than anyone imagined. But conditions would be far worse without the president's steady leadership. This is not the time to reverse course and return to the failed policies of the past."

"We wish the economic recovery was more vigorous, and we would like the president to present a sharper vision for a second term," it continued. "But Obama has capably steered the nation through an incredibly difficult period at home and abroad, often with little help from Congress. The next four years will not be easy for whoever occupies the Oval Office, but Obama has been tested by harsh circumstance and proven himself worthy of a second term."

>> President Barack Obama addresses the crowd at a rally at St. Petersburg College's Seminole Campus on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012 in St Petersburg, Fla.

Orlando Sentinel, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 173,576

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

Between sputtering economic growth and growing federal debt, the Orlando Sentinel's editorial board wrote that it has little confidence Obama would be more successful as president in a second term and endorsed Romney instead.

"Obama's defenders would argue that he inherited the worst economy since the Great Depression, and would have made more progress if not for obstruction from Republicans in Congress," the endorsement said. However, "other presidents have succeeded even with the other party controlling Capitol Hill. Democrat Bill Clinton presided over an economic boom and balanced the budget working with Republicans. Leaders find a way."

The endorsement concluded by rejecting innuendos critics have put on the president, including that he's a business-hating socialist, intent on weakening the American military, unpatriotic or born outside the U.S.

Even so, the article concluded, "After reflecting on his four years in the White House, we also don't think that he's the best qualified candidate in this race."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney gestures during a campaign stop at Con-Air Industries, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, in Orlando, Fla.

Tampa Tribune, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 144,510

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

Mitt Romney is the person who can lead the nation out of its "economic doldrums," the Tampa Tribune endorsement said.

"We don't question Obama's motives. The president sincerely believes in the inviolable ability of the federal government to make all things right. But Americans should see that this top-down approach doesn't work," the endorsement said. "Romney, in contrast, would capitalize on individuals' ingenuity, not Washington directives."

"A few of Romney's stands trouble us," the endorsement said. "He can be bellicose on foreign affairs. His gushing enthusiasm for oil drilling and fossil fuels is a worry in Florida, where drilling off our Gulf of Mexico beaches would be a disaster.

"But we are reassured by Romney's history as a deliberate leader of strong conservative values who will listen to others and carefully evaluate the facts."

"President Obama may have good intentions, but he is simply taking the nation in the wrong direction," the article concluded. "Seasoned executive Romney would come to office ready to put the country on the course to more freedom and prosperity."

>> Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney walks down a hallway as he leaves his hotel to board his motorcade, in Tampa, Fla., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, en route to Ohio.

South Florida Sun Sentinel, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 165,974

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

Behind all the rhetoric in the divisive campaign, the one thing Americans care about is the economy, and there's "little reason to believe (Obama) can turn things around," the Sun Sentinel editorial said. Therefore the paper chose to go with Romney.

"We believe Romney's past performance is a predictor of his future behavior. He's proven himself to be a successful businessman. He rescued the 2002 Winter Olympics from scandal and mismanagement. He worked with a Democrat-dominated legislature as governor of Massachusetts to close a $3 billion budget deficit — without borrowing and raising taxes.

Certainly we have problems with Romney. At various times, and depending on whom he is speaking to, he has tried to appeal to social conservatives and immigration extremists. His foray overseas this summer was hardly a roaring success, but during the most recent debate, he showed himself to be considered a leader capable of keeping our ship of state on a steady course."

The greatest threat to the national defense is not the size of the military, but rather the size of our national debt, the endorsement said. Because of that, the paper switched from its 2008 endorsement, choosing instead to endorse Romney in 2012.

>> Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks to supporters in Miami, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012.

Miami Herald, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 160,988

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Although both candidates bring a lot to the table and have much to offer as far as positive stories about themselves, Romney's contradictory positions raise doubts about what he stands for, the paper endorsement said, therefore making Obama the better choice.

"In the end, Mr. Obama's policies across the board - the environment, social policy, taxes and immigration - offer a more generous vision for America. The issues he has fought for, coupled with the lingering doubts about Mr. Romney's persona and his true intentions, make this a clear choice. In the race for president, The Miami Herald recommends Barack Obama."

>> President Barack Obama waves as he prepares to depart aboard Air Force One from Miami International Airport, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012 in Miami.

Florida Times-Union, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 98,580

2008 endorsement: Split

2012 endorsement: Romney

The nation needs a man who can deal with red ink, has "that American strain of pragmatism" and who is seeking to serve the public. That man, the Florida Times-Union endorsement said, is Mitt Romney.

"The incumbent, Barack Obama, deserves credit for helping to prevent a second Great Depression. He also deserves credit for getting out of Iraq and killing Osama bin Laden.
That is enough for one presidency," the endorsement said. "Obama, as illustrated by his performance in the debates, seems out of fresh ideas."

Although Romney has been accused of being a flip-flopper, he is more accurately described a pragmatist — a problem solver — and this is what America needs, the endorsement said.

"Romney understands that a revived business sector is the key to turning around the American economy," it continued. "Romney is the best person to lead America at this crucial time."

>> Supporters trying to get a glimpse of Mitt Romney inside his Jacksonville Fla campaign headquarters.

Palm Beach Post, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 110,373

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Will not endorse this year

>> President Barack Obama, right and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney chat following the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Denver.

Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Florida
Associated Press

Circulation: 79,845

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Will not endorse this year

>> Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney listens and President Barack Obama answers a question during the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Des Moines Register, Iowa
Associated Press

Circulation: 101,915

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

In one of the more anticipated endorsements in the weeks leading up to the Nov. 6 election, the Des Moines Register endorsed Romney Saturday, flipping from supporting Obama in 2008. It is the first time the paper has endorsed a Republican since 1972.

"The president's best efforts to resuscitate the stumbling economy have fallen short. Nothing indicates it would change with a second term in the White House," the Romney endorsement said.

"Barack Obama rocketed to the presidency from relative obscurity with a theme of hope and change. A different reality has marked his presidency. His record on the economy the past four years does not suggest he would lead in the direction the nation must go in the next four years.

"Voters should give Mitt Romney a chance to correct the nation’s fiscal course and to implode the partisan gridlock that has shackled Washington and the rest of America — with the understanding that he would face the same assessment in four years if he does not succeed."

The endorsement came after the editorial board talked with both Obama and Romney. The Obama campaign's original conversation was off the record, and the paper's Rick Green slammed the conditions in an editorial. The Obama campaign later relented and released a transcript of the conversation.

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney takes the stage to speak about the economy at a campaign rally at Kinzler Construction Services in Ames, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 26, 2012.

Detroit Free Press, Michigan
Associated Press

Circulation: 232,696

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

The Detroit Free Press listed Obama's "stunning record of accomplishments," including General Motors and Chrysler, the economy, the Affordable Care Act and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, saying that with those, a second term "ought to be a no-brainer."

"The country is safer. Its economy and its largest industry have been restored to health. And health care reform, fought out over 50 years in the U.S. Congress, has at last begun in earnest," the endorsement said. "When Republicans say pejoratively that Obama 'can't run on his record,' they’re peddling partisan nonsense and indulging a myopic fiction."

"Obama's first term proved he can deliver at home under the worst imaginable circumstances, battling multiple crises that individually would have sunk lesser presidents; abroad, Obama has restored American credibility and influence that was frittered away by former President George W. Bush. With a refocus on job creation and long-term sustainability, his second four years could impress even more."

>> In this April 18, 2012, file photo President Barack Obama waves to a crowd as he arrives at an airport in Detroit.

Macomb County Advisor & Source, Michigan
Associated Press

Circulation: 121,759

2008 endorsement:

2012 endorsement: To be decided

>> President Barack Obama is greeted by moderator Bob Schieffer, center, as Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney stands nearby at the start of the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Detroit News, Michigan
Associated Press

Circulation: 133,508

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

The Detroit News called the 2012 election a "big deal decision between two honorable men with starkly different roadmaps," and suggested in its endorsement that Romney offers the best hope of changing the nation's fate.

"Romney has been an effective leader his entire career, both in business and politics. As governor of Massachusetts, he worked with a Democratic legislature to produce difficult health care and education reforms. We are optimistic he can restore the art of compromise to Washington," the endorsement said.

"Romney's goal is to help all Americans live independent and productive lives, free to rise to the extent of their personal capabilities. He would not shield them from risk or the consequences of their decisions, but neither would he deny them their earned rewards.

"Our hope is that Mitt Romney would restore faith in the core principles of free men and women, free minds and free markets that made America great, and will keep it so."

The Detroit News account also later defended the endorsement on Twitter, saying, "For people questioning our endorsement: If there were a time to support Obama, it would've been in Hope & Change election of 2008, not now."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, addresses the Detroit Economic Club at Ford Field in Detroit, Friday, Feb. 24, 2012.

Las Vegas Review-Journal, Nevada
Associated Press

Circulation: 220,619

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

No other state has suffered more economic hardships over the past five years, and no other state will benefit more from a real economic recovery, the Las Vegas Review-Journal said in an editorial. Because of that, the endorsement stated, Romney is the proper choice.

"Nevadans need a president with a vision and political philosophy capable of restoring ingenuity, competition and excellence to our education and health care systems, of paring back the budget deficit and the explosive growth of our debt, of keeping energy affordable, of bringing back jobs and prosperity not just here, but in every American city with residents who want enough economic security to be able to take a Las Vegas vacation," the endorsement said.

"If we are to avoid a lost decade and a future calamity created by inaction on entitlements and government growth, this nation needs a team of turnaround experts. Mr. Romney has promised to create a Cabinet of private-sector leaders focused on strengthening the country's business climate and making it more competitive. He and his running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, have dared to put forward ideas to preserve Medicare for current beneficiaries and reform it for future recipients, and they vow to work with Congress to prevent the program's collapse."

"The choice is clear," the endorsement concluded. "Only Mitt Romney has the principles and experience needed to put America back on the road to prosperity."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, and his vice presidential running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., talk aboard their campaign plane en route from Las Vegas to a campaign event in Denver, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012.

Las Vegas Sun, Nevada
Associated Press

Circulation: Independently produced newspaper packaged with the Las Vegas Review-Journal

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Although Mitt Romney's presentation of himself as a reasonable alternative to Obama is appealing, the editorial board argued his changes "would make a chameleon blush," and endorsed Obama over Romney.

"Unlike his opponents, Obama has offered plans for the entire nation, and he has done a credible job of working to stimulate the economy and to help homeowners as well as businesses," the endorsement said.

"Overall, the country is on the mend, but the middle class, small businesses and home­owners need more help. We see only one candidate who has the experience, plans and vision to provide that help."

>> President Barack Obama waves to the crowd as he arrives at a campaign rally, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, in Las Vegas.

Reno Gazette-Journal, Nevada
Associated Press

Circulation: 66,409

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

The Reno Gazette-Journal changed its support from being for Obama in 2008 to being for Romney in 2012, saying that it was a hard decision, and that a recommendation against an incumbent can't be taken lightly.

"While (Obama) had to contend with a Republican Party that was determined to deny him a second term at any cost, Obama cannot avoid the consequences of poor decisions and misplaced priorities," the editorial said. "A vote to re-elect Obama promises four more years of the same . . . the president has shown little understanding of how his failures are affecting the nation, and he hasn’t offered any tangible proposals to change course."

Although Romney is not without failings, the endorsement said, the U.S. and Nevada "cannot afford four more years of the same."

"The change Obama promised four years ago is needed right now."

>> With the Reno Mountains in the background, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney steps off his campaign plane at Reno-Tahoe International Airport in Reno, Nev., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012.

New Hampshire Union Leader, New Hampshire
Associated Press

Circulation: 48,342

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

The key difference between Romney and Obama is that Romney understands sputtering economies are not sparked back to life by the government, but rather by unleashing the energy and creativity of the American people, the Union Leader endorsement said.

"While Obama offers rhetoric and pipe dreams, Romney offers a real plan to bring the economy back to life. It is not the George W. Bush plan. Bush spent more than he took in. Obama, who doubled Bush’s level of deficit spending, accuses Romney of wanting to return to Bush-type deficit spending. It is not true, but if it were, that would be an improvement over the last four years.

"Obama had four years — half of them with a Democratic majority in Congress — to try his way. Romney offers a better way, a realistic way, to restore American prosperity. We tried the fantasy. It did not work. Now it is time to stop dreaming and start growing again."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks with military veterans outside an event by the "New Hampshire Veterans and Military Families for Mitt" in Concord, N.H., Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012.

Cleveland Plain Dealer, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 286,405

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Four years ago the Cleveland Plain Dealer endorsed Obama, and on Oct. 20, it again recommended him for president, saying he has led the nation back from the brink of depression.

However, the paper cautioned, this year's endorsement "comes with less enthusiasm or optimism."

The endorsement asked Ohio citizens to consider "a defining moment early in Obama's first term" — the auto bailout.

"Obama told the companies to restructure using the Bankruptcy Court and set conditions for government financing: GM's chairman had to go. Excess plants and dealerships had to close. Chrysler had to be bought out by Fiat. Contracts had to be renegotiated.

"It was unpopular but gutsy. And it worked. Ohioans today are making cars in Lordstown and Toledo. They're making parts and steel for Ford, Honda and other automakers. They're back on the job.

"That's leadership that deserves a chance to finish the job. Re-elect President Obama."

>> President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at Burke Lakefront Airport Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012, in Cleveland.

Cincinnati Enquirer, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 144,165

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

President Obama has had four years to overcome the job losses of the recession, but the recovery has been too slow and weak, and therefore it's time for new leadership, the Cincinnati Enquirer argued in its endorsement.

"If Romney can stabilize and expand the U.S. economy, his greatest foreign policy contribution could be employing reinvigorated U.S. economic muscle to influence the global economy," the endorsement said. "This is a precarious time for America. We’d expect a President Romney to lead toward the center, to resist the calls for a hard turn to the right that are sure to come from within his party."

"Romney as president should stay true to who he is — a moderate leader who can work with the left and right, with business and with government, and who will set an example, both as an individual and as the leader of the United States of America."

>> Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, eats a cookie with a likeness of himself on his campaign bus en route to Celina, Ohio, for a campaign rally, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012.

Columbus Dispatch, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 136,023

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

After four years of economic stagnation, massive unemployment, record debt and government intrusions, Mitt Romney offers a new direction for the county, the Columbus Dispatch argued in its endorsement.

"As a career businessman and former governor, Romney brings a wealth of executive experience in the private sector and the public sector that dwarfs that of Obama," the endorsement said. "From working both sides of the government/private-sector equation, he understands how that relationship can aid or impede prosperity. His election would be an immediate signal to the private sector that someone who knows what he is doing is managing the nation’s economic policy. The effect on business confidence would be dramatic and immediate, and business confidence is the vital ingredient needed to spur investment and hiring, the two things that the United States so desperately needs."

"In 2008, Americans made a leap of faith when they elevated the inexperienced Obama to the White House. That faith was not rewarded," the article concluded. "This time, voters should place their hopes for change in experience, by electing Romney."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney talks with Air Force pilots in front of a T-38 training jet at Port Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio, Friday, Oct. 12, 2012.

Toledo Blade, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 94,215

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Another term for Obama would be better for Ohio, Michigan and the rest of the country than electing Romney, The Blade said in its endorsement.

"A 1964 Blade editorial described the GOP nominee's father, then-Michigan Gov. George Romney, as “a successful man of affairs who sees nothing soft-headed about wanting to do good for others.” We had hoped to be able to say the same of Mitt Romney. We can't," the article said.

"There have been lapses in President Obama's first-term performance," the editorial said, listing unemployment, the deficit, immigration reform, trade enforcement, national security, entitlement reform, climate change and gun control, among other things. "But Mr. Romney’s prescriptions on such matters, to the extent he has any, are worse."

>> President Obama stops autographs papers after arriving at Toledo Express Airport in Swanton, Ohio, Wednesday Sept. 26, 2012.

Dayton Daily News, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 93,425

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Will not endorse this year

>> President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney participate in the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012.

Akron Beacon-Journal, Ohio
Associated Press

Circulation: 88,040

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

President Obama shouldn't be measured merely against his soaring words of the 2008 campaign, the Beacon-Journal endorsement said. Instead, he should be measured on his real accomplishments and the direction he proposed for the country. Based on those two things, the paper argued, Obama deserves another term.

"What is telling about a presidency is its tilt, its direction, spirit and priorities. Thus, to those who argue the president lacks a plan for a second term: Look at the foundation that has been set. He has used the levers of government to bolster the economy, investing in education, innovation and health care, understanding the essential role of the public sector in competitiveness. Those tasks are not complete. They would continue."

"No question, Romney is a smart, successful financier, a man of faith and accomplishment," the editorial said, switching focus. "What troubles is his public character, the opportunistic shifts and more. It is unacceptable that in seeking the presidency, he refuses to share his income tax returns in a way comparable to what he required of his running mate, Paul Ryan.

"Finally, Romney cannot walk back easily his comments at a Florida fund-raiser about 47 percent of Americans refusing to take responsibility or care for their lives. He either was telling the crowd what he thought it wanted to hear, or he believes what he said. Either way, the words aren't worthy of a president."

>> President Barack Obama is greeted by Akron, Ohio Mayor Don Plusquellic, center, and City of Canton, Stark County Chair Randy Gonzalez, left, upon his arrival at Akron-Canton Regional Airport, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012, in North Canton, Ohio.

Philadelphia Inquirer, Pennsylvania
Associated Press

Circulation: 325,291

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

Comparing the Republican party to a carnival barker trying to get crowds to forget the tricks they've seen before, the Philadelphia Inquirer endorsed Obama before criticizing Romney.

"Like every election with an incumbent, this one is mostly about that person's performance. But that doesn't mean the challenger gets to escape scrutiny," the editorial said. "And when you take a close look at Romney, you have to question what is real and what isn't."

In terms of Obama's accomplishments, the endorsement said he "deserves more than the grudging credit Republicans are giving him for being the commander in chief who finally got Osama bin Laden. America is safer as a result of that. America will be healthier, with more people insured, as a result of Obamacare. More Americans are employed, although not nearly enough, because of Obama's saving the auto industry and promoting policies that are creating jobs."

"What Obama has already been able to accomplish in the face of unrelenting partisan opposition suggests he could have a remarkably successful presidency if given a second term," the article concluded.

>> President Barack Obama greets people in the audience after speaking at a campaign event at The Franklin Institute, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, in Philadelphia.

Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Pennsylvania
Associated Press

Circulation: 188,545

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

The Pittsburg Post-Gazette argued that ordinarily, with current the economic malaise affecting the U.S., voters might need to scrap the Democratic administration and go Republican instead.

But these are extraordinary times, the article said, in explaining its decision to endorse Obama.

"To be sure, President Barack Obama has made mistakes and has disappointed some of his supporters, but the Great Recession, no more than the Great Depression, wasn't going to go away with a wave of the president's hand or melt before his optimism," the article said. "The fact that progress has lagged behind public patience is not the measure of Mr. Obama's record; the greater reality is that he came into office when the nation was pole-axed and on its knees. Now the great engine of the economy, which Obama policies kept cranking, is sputtering into life."

"This well may be a generation-defining moment. What will America's future be? Will this still be a land of opportunity and freedom for all people or just for the favored few?" the endorsement asked.

"Because we still hope, we endorse for president Barack Obama, whose heart — unlike his challenger — has not wavered nor his principles changed."

>> President Barack Obama speaks at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa., Friday, July 6, 2012. Obama is on a two-day bus trip through Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Pennsylvania
Associated Press

Circulation: 188,405

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

America is at a crossroads, left to choose between a path of limited government and prosperity-producing independence, or Leviathan government and increasing dependence on it, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review argued in its endorsement. Because it chooses the first path, the paper said, its choice for president is Mitt Romney.

"While President Obama argues that it is imprudent to change horses in midstream, that he is deserving of four more years to complete his agenda, the American people know you can’t reach the opposite bank on a drowning horse," the article said.

"Mitt Romney offers a seasoned, strategic and mature public policy mind so sorely needed in the White House and so necessary to enable our great nation and its people to excel," the endorsement concluded. "It’s time to begin restoring America. It’s time to elect Mitt Romney as president of the United States."

>> In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney shares a laugh while meeting with a group of Pittsburgh area residents in Bethel Park, Pa.

Allentown Morning Call, Pennsylvania
Associated Press

Circulation: 100,196

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: To be decided

>> President Barack Obama shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Denver.

The Virginian Pilot, Virginia
Associated Press

Circulation: 142,476

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: None

The Virginian Pilot announced in October 2007 that it would no longer endorse political candidates, according to information from The American Presidency Project.

>> President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney meet family members after the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Richmond Times-Dispatch, Virginia
Associated Press

Circulation: 108,559

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

It is difficult to recall a campaign less truthful than President Obama's in 2012, the Richmond Times-Dispatch argued in its endorsement editorial, before concluding that it's therefore time to elect a president who will not "lie to the America people every time he opens his mouth," and who understands economic growth.

"Romney understands the value of free enterprise, appreciates its utterly unique ability to alleviate poverty, unleash creative endeavor, spread wealth and lift the burden of ceaseless backbreaking labor," the editorial said. "In this year's presidential campaign, he is alone in that respect."

"During the debates, the president's personal attacks on his opponent were, most often, met with strong but dignified answers. The president showed himself to be the less presidential of the two contenders. As a result, we know now who is better suited to lead a great but troubled nation.

"Mitt Romney has succeeded as a family man, governor, entrepreneur, Olympic leader. He is a man of character, a problem-solver, a turnaround specialist. He has earned our enthusiastic endorsement. America needs President Romney."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney gestures during a rally in Richmond, Va., Friday, Oct. 12, 2012.

Roanoke Times, Virginia
Associated Press

Circulation: 78,663

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: Will not endorse

>> President Barack Obama, right, and first lady Michelle Obama wave as they walk off stage as Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, and his wife Ann, say goodbye to the crowd before departing after the third presidential debate on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Wisconsin
Associated Press

Circulation: 185,710

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: No longer endorses, as of Oct. 26, 2012

"When I was appointed editorial page editor nearly two years ago, I pledged that our pages would be 'fiercely independent' and that we would 'offer a marketplace of ideas,'" editorial page editor David Haynes wrote on Oct. 26.
"That's why we have decided that the Editorial Board should get out of the political endorsement business. We will analyze key races this fall, but we will not make recommendations."

Bruce Murphy of Urban Milwaukee, Inc., wrote on Oct. 24 that the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "felt the heat of endorsing Republican Gov. Scott Walker in the bitterly contested recall election and decided it wasn't worth it."

>> Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney listens as President Barack Obama speaks during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y.

Wisconsin State Journal, Wisconsin
Associated Press

Circulation: 83,083

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Romney

"Not enough hope and too little change." That was how the Wisconsin State Journal summed up President Obama's first term in its endorsement of Romney made just days before the election. Saying the choice wasn't an easy one, the paper switched its support from its 2008 endorsement of President Obama.

This election is about jobs, a slow economy and Washington's dysfunction, the paper said, and the buck stops with the president.

"It was Obama and his fellow Democrats who went it alone on health care, making subsequent deals even harder to find," the editorial board wrote. "It was Obama who too often let Congress steer the ship in circles. It still is Obama who hasn't laid out a clear vision for the next four years.

"We endorsed Obama for change last time around. Now we're endorsing change again: Mitt Romney."

>> Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney answers a question as President Barack Obama listens during the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Green Bay Press-Gazette, Wisconsin
Associated Press

Circulation: 55,987

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

Four years after President Obama's election, the economy hasn't rebounded, the deficit and debt have grown, poverty has increased and household income has dropped. For these reasons, the nation cannot wait four more years to see if Obama's polices will work, the Green Bay Press-Gazette said in its endorsement.

Despite Romney's flaws and Obama's achievements, the paper said that it "can’t ignore the state of the economy today. It is the overriding factor in people’s lives. How they pay for health care, how they pay for their mortgage, how they pay the bills, how they pay for retirement are all chief concerns that need to be answered. They are concerns that cut across are classes and are paramount in deciding who should be in the White House."

"How long can Obama blame his predecessor for the current financial woes without taking any responsibility for some of the economic duress and gridlock?" the paper asked. "At some point, the problems a president inherits become his problems if he hasn’t been able to solve them.

"At that point, then, we need someone else in the White House who can solve them. We believe that person is Mitt Romney."

>> Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at a welcome home rally Sunday, Aug., 12, 2012 in Waukesha, Wis. At right is Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

National: Wall Street Journal
Associated Press

Circulation: 2,118,315

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: None

The Wall Street Journal generally does not endorse candidates, according to information from The American Presidency Project.

>> From left, President Barack Obama, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, and his wife Ann Romney attend the Archdiocese of New York's 67th Annual Alfred. E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York.

National: The New York Times
Associated Press

Circulation: 1,586,757

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

President Obama showed firm commitment to using government to foster growth, formed sensible budget policies and worked to save the social safety net, The New York Times argued in its presidential endorsement. Romney, on the other hand, the paper said, has gotten this far with a guile "that allows him to say whatever he thinks an audience wants to hear."

"We have criticized individual policy choices that Mr. Obama has made over the last four years, and have been impatient with his unwillingness to throw himself into the political fight," the paper said. "But he has shaken off the hesitancy that cost him the first debate, and he approaches the election clearly ready for the partisan battles that would follow his victory.

"In the poisonous atmosphere of this campaign, it may be easy to overlook Mr. Obama’s many important achievements, including carrying out the economic stimulus, saving the auto industry, improving fuel efficiency standards, and making two very fine Supreme Court appointments."

>> President Barack Obama greets well-wishers as he arrives at JFK International Airport in New York, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012, on his way to Attend the 67th Annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner.

National: The Washington Post
Associated Press

Circulation: 507,615

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

President Obama is better positioned to be the navigator of the Jan. 1 tax hikes and spending cuts, The Washington Post argued, and therefore earned the endorsement of the paper.

"We come to that judgment with eyes open to the disappointments of Mr. Obama’s time in office," the article said.
"He did not end, as he promised he would, “our chronic avoidance of tough decisions” on fiscal matters. But Mr. Obama is committed to the only approach that can succeed: a balance of entitlement reform and revenue increases."

"The president understands the urgency of the problems as well as anyone in the country and is committed to solving them in a balanced way," the article concluded. "In a second term, working with an opposition that we hope would be chastened by the failure of its scorched-earth campaign against him, he is far more likely than his opponent to succeed. That makes Mr. Obama by far the superior choice."

>> President Barack Obama walks with his daughters Sasha, foreground, and Malia as they leave St. John's Episcopal Church and return to the White House in Washington, on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012.

National: USA Today
Associated Press

Circulation: 1,817,446

2008 endorsement: None

2012 endorsement: None

USA Today does not endorse candidates, according to information from The American Presidency Project.

>> Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney listens as President Barack Obama speaks during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y.

National: Los Angeles Times
Associated Press

Circulation: 616,575

2008 endorsement: Obama

2012 endorsement: Obama

The nation has been "well served" by Obama, The Los Angeles Times said in its endorsement, while Romney has "demonstrated clearly" that he is the wrong choice.

"(Obama's) record is by no means perfect. His expansive use of executive power is troubling, as is his continuation of some of the indefensible national security policies of the George W. Bush administration," the paper said. "Obama swept into office as a transformative figure, but the expectations built up by the long campaign thudded back to earth amid an unexpectedly steep recession and hyperbolic opposition from the right. That the GOP has sought to block his agenda wherever possible is undeniable, but truly great leaders find ways to bring opposing factions together when the times demand it; Obama has not yet been able to do so."

"Voters face a momentous choice in November between two candidates offering sharply different prescriptions for what ails the country. Obama's recalls the successful formula of the 1990s, when the government raised taxes and slowed spending to close the deficit. The alternative offered by Romney would neglect the country's infrastructure and human resources for the sake of yet another tax cut and a larger defense budget than even the Pentagon is seeking."

>> In this photo provided by NBC, President Barack Obama appears on "The Tonight Show" with Jay Leno Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, in Los Angeles.

National: New York Post
Associated Press

Circulation: 555,327

2008 endorsement: McCain

2012 endorsement: Romney

Four years ago, America tried the "great Barack Obama experiment," The New York Post said in an Oct. 25 editorial.

"It didn't work out," the paper concluded.

"Americans need jobs — jobs for those trying to raise a family, jobs for those who are leaving school, jobs period!

"Instead, they are about to be saddled with an unworkable health-care boondoggle that will suck hundreds of billions from a private-sector economy that could better use the cash to create — yes — more jobs!

"Can Mitt Romney really turn all this around? Yes, he can."