blmiers2 via Flickr

Economists say it was underfunded pensions that drove Stockton and other California cities to bankruptcy. Now, some states are experiencing massive pension gaps, with some as wide as $76.3 billion, according to 24/7 Wall Street. The following is a list from 24/7 Wall Street showing 9 states whose pension systems are at least 40 percent underfunded.

9 Alaska
blmiers2 via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 60%
Total liability: $16.6 billion (13th smallest)
Total funded: $10.0 billion (12th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AAA

8 New Hampshire
jimmywayne via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 59%
Total liability: $9.0 billion (6th smallest)
Total funded: $5.3 billion (3rd smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA

7 West Virginia

Percent liability funded: 58%
Total liability: $15.0 billion (12th smallest)
Total funded: $8.7 billion (10th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA

6 Oklahoma

Percent liability funded: 56%
Total liability: $36.4 billion (23rd smallest)
Total funded: $20.4 billion (18th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA+

5 Louisiana
SutSteeger via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 56%
Total liability: $41.4 billion (25th largest)
Total funded: $23.2 billion (23rd smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA

4 Kentucky
OZinOH via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 54%
Total liability: $37.0 billion (24th smallest)
Total funded: $20.0 billion (17th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA-

3 Connecticut
Dougtone via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 53%
Total liability: $44.8 billion (22nd largest)
Total funded: $23.8 billion (24th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA

2 Rhode Island
jimmywayne via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 49%
Total liability: $13.4 billion (10th smallest)
Total funded: $6.6 billion (4th smallest)
S&P credit rating: AA

1 Illinois
jimmywayne via Flickr

Percent liability funded: 45%
Total liability: $138.8 billion (6th largest)
Total funded: $62.5 billion (11th largest)
S&P credit rating: A+