He was basically trying to help me figure out how to get into a regular routine that I can stay consistent with. He said it will definitely help you out on the court. —Jazz rookie Trey Burke, on talking with Miami's Ray Allen

SALT LAKE CITY — A pregame assignment turned into a memorable opportunity for Trey Burke.

Hours before Utah and Miami played Saturday night, Jazz assistant Sidney Lowe suggested that the rookie point guard come out to the court to watch how Heat sharpshooter Ray Allen conducted his warm-up routine.

After finishing that portion of his pregame prep, the 18-year NBA veteran then engaged in a courtside chat with the observing rookie.

“We had a nice little conversation,” Burke said.

The gist?

“He was basically trying to help me figure out how to get into a regular routine that I can stay consistent with,” Burke said. “He said it will definitely help you out on the court.”

Allen told Burke that he didn’t get into a routine early in his career and it resulted in him being “kind of all over the place.” The structure Allen eventually implemented helped him get into a more consistent rhythm while playing.

That’s a point Lowe, a former NBA point guard, has been emphasizing to Burke.

“Me and Coach Lowe have been talking a lot about getting in that routine and establishing that early on,” Burke said. “He said guys usually establish it three or four years in your career. He said the earlier you get it and the earlier you’re consistent at it, the better.”

Burke was appreciative that an established NBA star like Allen would take the time to help him. One thing Burke took away from the conversation was to focus on shots he’ll take during games.

“That made me excited and a lot more confident,” Burke said. “You always like talking to vets like that, a vet that’s been in this league for years, has the experience. I just try to soak it all up and apply it.”

Jazz coach Tyrone Corbin said he hopes Burke learned a lesson on “how to be around forever” like Allen.

“He understands how he has to work to be effective on the floor and young guys need to hear that from their peers,” Corbin said. “We talk as coaches and development coaches tell them all the time. They think they’re just trying to make them work and work and work. This guy’s done it. His body of work is showing why he’s still around and why he’s still effective.”

Corbin was impressed that the Heat’s 38-year-old standout would take time with Utah’s 21-year-old up-and-comer.

“I think it’s a great thing that NBA players do in this league — they share their knowledge, they share their successes with their peers,” Corbin said. “He felt the importance to sit down and talk to a young guy about what it takes to be who he is in this league. … His body of work is showing why he’s still around and why he’s still effective. For one of (Burke’s) peers to give him that time, especially on a night we’re getting ready to compete against him, is great.”

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