CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Now's your chance to see the comet that passed within 100 million miles of Earth last week.

Tonight's twilight will provide the best photo op for the comet called Pan-STARRS. It will be visible in the Northern Hemisphere just above the western horizon — right next to a crescent moon.

California astronomer Tony Phillips said the glare of the setting sun may make it difficult to see the comet with the naked eye. But he encourages casual sky gazers to give it a shot. The moon will provide an easy point of reference.

"All by itself, the slender moon will be super-beautiful. If you can see a comet right beside it … what a bonus!" he wrote in an email from his home and observatory in the Sierra Nevada.

Remember your binoculars, but be certain not to point them at the setting sun, he warned.

Next week, the comet should be easier to spot. It will be higher in the western sky and therefore visible for longer once the sun sets. The surrounding darkness, versus twilight, will make it stand out if the sky is clear.

"Not a great comet, but still a pretty good one," Phillips noted.

Pan-STARRS was visible for weeks from the Southern Hemisphere before popping up on the upper half of the globe in recent days.

Although billions of years old, Pan-STARRS is making its first-ever cruise through the inner solar system. The ice ball passed within 28 million miles of the sun Sunday, its closest approach to our star and within the orbit of Mercury.