As I walk every day, I am surrounded by people — bombarded by them. I am in a mass of constant motion and purpose.

We all have the same purpose: to get to class. Occasionally I see some acquaintances of mine and I lift a hand in greeting or call out, "Hello!" But most of the time I walk silently.

As I walk, I try to take in my surroundings. But what bothers me is when I look at people and suddenly our eyes meet, they look down. Why? I am just looking at you. I am not judging you, I am not criticizing you. So why don't you look at me? I want to engage for a moment in meeting another great human being, but you ruin that moment and my gesture of friendship by looking down.

Everyone does it, not just college students — but why are we afraid to look? In a country where individuals boldly stand up and say who they're voting for, why are we afraid of looking at each other? Are we worried people will not accept the real us if our facade is down? Why won't you look at me?

Miquelle Leslie

Provo